Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 41496 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #60 on: October 27, 2012, 12:30:25 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Sab Jan was also liked by Mother Azhagamma very much. In those days, where caste and religion played a major role in
orthodox families,  Mother Azhagamma used to feed him in the Tiruchuzhi house, with her own hands.

Arunacahala Siva.   

Nagaraj

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Did you have a nice swim?
« Reply #61 on: October 28, 2012, 04:49:48 PM »
"Once when I was a young boy, a friend and I were in the Arunachala Temple.
As it was very hot we went to the tank in the temple and began splashing and
playing in the water. I inadvertently went into the water over my head and began
sinking. I came to the surface a few times but was unable to stay afloat. My friend
got scared seeing me in distress and ran off. Just before I went under for the last
time I remember distinctly seeing Bhagavan's face, and then everything went
blank - I became unconscious.

When I later regained consciousness I found that I was lying on a step just near
the tank. I asked someone nearby how I got out of the water. I was told that an
old man had come and pulled me out, laid me down on the step and then went
away. Somehow I survived the ordeal. After nearly drowning, I went to the
ashram and sat in the hall without telling anyone what had just happened.
Bhagavan turned in my direction and said with a gentle smile on his lips,
"Did you have a nice swim?" I put my head down, as I felt extremely guilty and
thought that everyone was watching me. Who else was it than Bhagavan
who saved me?"

(story told by K. V. Mama)




“You cannot travel the path until
you have become the path itself”
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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #62 on: October 28, 2012, 04:53:39 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

That boy's name is Ramanan. He has been saved from sure death on two occasions. Once in the Ayyankulam tank and on another
occasion when he was stung by snake and he became black and blue in his body and Sri Ramana told him: Nothing has happened.
You wake up. He woke up!  Jnanis also can display Siddhis but they do not do it so often.

Arunachala Siva. 

Nagaraj

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Little Sister
« Reply #63 on: October 29, 2012, 08:31:23 AM »
Little Sister

Venkataraman's only sister AlamElu was a little girl. Being the only female child, she was pampered by the family. It is said that she used to cry to see her grandfather living in Pasalai, a village a few kilometers from Tiruchizhi. Once she was taken there she at once would want to go back to her mother. Sometimes Venkataraman would accompany her. While returning seeing his sister's tender feet getting blisters walking on the rough path, Venkataraman would cut off the wild vines growing on the way side and tie round her little feet which will serve as slippers. Such was his concern for his sister.

(ABOG I,29)




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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #64 on: October 29, 2012, 01:17:36 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Yes. When young Venkataraman's concern was limited only to her sister, Alamelu Athai, for devotees, His compassion on
Self Realization, spread to the whole universe. And Grace flowed in huge quantity for all the ardent devotees.

Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #65 on: October 29, 2012, 05:58:33 PM »
Just being made to play nAraDa i guess  :D

INITIATION

A devotee asked, “Can anyone get any benefit by repeating sacred syllables (mantras) picked up casually?” Sri Bhagavan replied, “No. He must be competent and initiated in such mantras.” To illustrate this he told the following story.

A KING VISITED his minister in his residence. There he was told that the minister was engaged in repetition of sacred syllables (japa). The king waited for him and, on meeting him, asked what the japa was. The minister said that it was the holiest of all, Gayatri. The king desired to be initiated by the minister but the minister confessed his inability to initiate him. Therefore the king learned it from someone else, and meeting the minister later he repeated the Gayatri and wanted to know if it was right. The minister said that the mantra was correct, but it was not proper for him to say it. When pressed for an explanation the minister called to a page close by and ordered him to take hold of the king. The order was not obeyed. The order was often repeated, and still not obeyed. The king flew into a rage and ordered the same man to hold the minister, and it was immediately done. The minister laughed and said that the incident was the explanation required by the king. “How?” asked the king. The minister replied, “The order was the same and the executor also, but the authority was different. When I ordered, the effect was nil whereas, when you ordered, there was immediate effect. Similarly with mantras.”

(SPIRITUAL STORIES AS TOLD BY RAMANA MAHARSHI)

« Last Edit: October 29, 2012, 06:05:20 PM by Nagaraj »



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Ravi.N

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #66 on: October 29, 2012, 06:45:58 PM »
Nondi,The Lame Monkey and Sri Bhagavan:

There seems to be a natural affinity between monkeys and humans. Recall how the monkeys assisted Sri Rama in the Ramayana.Bhagavan was able to converse with monkeys and after a close observation of their ways discovered that they had a social and political structure or hierarchy. On several occasions the monkeys would go to the Maharshi with their disputes for arbitration. He would patiently listen to them and effect reconciliation among the contending parties.

A monkey-chief once bit an infant monkey which fainted. Taking it to be dead the monkey group left it there and went away. A little later the infant regained consciousness and made its way to Bhagavan's ashram. As it was limping, the ashramites referred to it as Nondi (the Lame one). Nondi was nursed back to normalcy. On one occasion the group of monkeys to which Nondi belonged passed by the ashram and took him back into their group.
This was unusual because monkeys generally avoid anyone of their clan who had contact with human beings. Nondi was a frequent visitor to the ashram and he would take quite a few liberties with Bhagavan. Nondi was quick to take offence; he was meticulously clean in his ways. Once, when Nondi spilled some rice on the ground the Maharshi
scolded him. Immediately Nondi slapped him near the eye. As a punishment, the Maharshi became very cold towards Nondi for some days. But Nondi pleaded with
him and found his way back to the Maharshi's lap.

On an earlier occasion also Nondi had misbehaved.The Maharshi was once blowing hot milk to be given to Nondi but the latter thought that the Maharshi was going
to sip the milk and slapped him. Soon after realising his mistake Nondi repented and got back into Bhagavan's good books. On that occasion Bhagavan was not hurt badly and that helped Nondi's quick rehabilitation.Making fun of Nondi, Bhagavan once said to him "You should not forget us when you become the Chief." By a
strange coincidence Nondi did become the Chief of their group bypassing three senior members. Nondi was keen on being anointed in Bhagavan's presence and went to
the ashram with his retinue but not finding him there spoilt all the trees of the ashram.

On his return, the Maharshi noticed the havoc and wondered why Nondi and his gang did what they had done. The next day Nondi visited the ashram but instead
of climbing on to the lap of Bhagavan, as he usually did,climbed up a tree and shook a branch — a privilege enjoyed only by a Chief of a group. On seeing that, the Maharshi
guessed that Nondi had become a Chief. After that Nondi came down and sat on the Maharshi's lap. Thereafter Nondi's predecessor in office came up and paid homage to Nondi.
This confirmed Bhagavan's guess. At mealtime Nondi sat beside Bhagavan but refused to touch the food and walked away. Surprised at this, the Maharshi followed him. Nondi went and sat among his subjects, with his queens sitting closeby. (Among monkeys the queens of the previous king continued to retain their status even under the new regime).
It became clear that Nondi would not partake of any meal without his subjects also being served. So, the ashramites, arranged a `royal banquet' for Nondi.A little later due to the machinations of his minister,Nondi lost his position and began living apart from his group with his progeny.

"Two months after the Maharshi left Skandasramam and settled down at Ramanasramam, Nondi came searching for him and continued to visit him every fortnight.
Once, an old monkey-chief became sick. He left his group and stood outside the Virupaksha cave. On coming to know this the Maharshi went out to look him up. He
also noticed that two previous Chiefs who were expelled by that monkey were on two nearby branches grieving for their erstwhile Chief. The Maharshi took the sick one inside the ashram and nursed him but to no avail. While the old monkey was about to die the other two let out a cry of agony. The Maharshi arranged for the burial of the
dead monkey with all honours due to a sannyasin.

Excerpted from 'Ramana Leela'

Balaji

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Floor Decoration
« Reply #67 on: October 30, 2012, 03:49:24 PM »
Floor Decoration with Lime Powder

On a festival day in 1944, some ladies were decorating the floor of the Asramam with rice paste prepared by soaking rice in water and grinding it subsequently. While returning from the cowhed, Bhagavan remarked to the people following him,” Look at those people, See what they are doing.  They concentrate their mind on that sort of work.  What to do?  Let them carry on.   Be careful not to step on the drawings.  Why should we step on them when they are doing it with such great devotion,”  So saying, he walked carefully without disturbing the designs and sat in the hall.

Immediately after that, Bhagavan noticed an old lady of the Asramam carefully drawing designs wiyth dry lime powder on the floor below the steps  opposite the hall.  Bhagavan called her by the familiar name, Granny, and when she came with great expectations, he said, “Look here, Granny, You are taking so much trouble for decorating the floor with that powder, but is it rice flour?”  When she replied that it was only powdered lime, Bhagavan said, “What a pity!  It will not be useful even for the ants.  The ladies there are also doing the same thing.   It is  a mere waste of time .  Their work is of no use whatsoever.  The paste they are using is made of rice dough which sticks to the ground and so the ants cannot eat it.  Decorating the floor really means feeding the ants.   If that dharma is given up and powdered lime is used not only the ants cannot eat it but if, by mistake, they come anywhere near, they die because of the strong pungent smell.  Why all that ? Please add at least ( some rice flour to it .”

An Andhra gentleman enquired, “Is it for feeding the ants that in the dhanurmasa, i.e. month of December-January , that floors are decorated with rice powder?.
“Yes of course!” said Bhagavan . “ Out of their feelings of happiness and joy at the receipt of the fresh crop of rice, they decorate the floor with rice powder thus feeding the ants.  Practices laid down by elders are always based on kindness to living creatures.  But who cares for those traditions now?   They do most things just for the sake of beauty only.”

From the Boundless Ocean of Grace Vol.V
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #68 on: October 30, 2012, 05:27:54 PM »
Once there was a lot of bed-bugs in Sri Bhagavan's sofa. In spite of clearning the cloths and pillows, somehow bugs found its place
there, perhaps inside the crevices of the sofa of Sri Bhagvan. Sri Bhagavan did not bother about them, though bugs were sucking
the blood of Sri Bhagavan. Once when Sri Bhagavan went for a stroll on the Hill, the attendant removed the cloths and pillows
and injected the DDT into the crevices. All bugs came out dead. He swept them off and then replaced the cloths with new ones and
placed the pillows. When Sri Bhagavan came back from stroll, He found the smell of DDT and understood the trick.

He said: Why have you killed them all? Let them have some food in my blood! He mildly rebuked the attendant.

Arunachala Siva,.   

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #69 on: October 31, 2012, 05:31:00 PM »
When I came to Bhagavan he was seated like a rock outside the ave,
without altering his look, which was filled with grace, compassion and
steady wisdom. I also stood by his side. After giving me a look,
he opened the gate of my heart and I was also established in his state.
In those days Bhagavan used to open our heart with a simple gracious
look and transform us. There was no need for any questions since he
made us, by his look, like himself.
 

Picture taken at her Ashram in dEsur:



This link may be of interest to devotees: http://gkamesh.wordpress.com/tag/desur/

(dEsurammA, akhilAndammA)




“You cannot travel the path until
you have become the path itself”
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Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #70 on: November 01, 2012, 08:32:02 AM »
BHAKTI’S TASTE

When I was writing to you yesterday about eating popcorn with boiled rice, I was reminded of another incident. Echamma’s cooking was never very good; it would not contain vegetables and spices in proper proportions. To Bhagavan her devotion was more tasty than her preparations and so he never complained, but some who could not relish the food casually hinted at this now and then while Bhagavan was cutting vegetables in the kitchen in the early morning hours. After hearing their complaints repeatedly Bhagavan said, “I don’t know. If you do not like the food you need not eat it. I find it quite good and I shall continue to do so.”

Sometime back, she was sending food for about a week or ten days through someone else because perhaps she was out of town or not quite well. The cooks one day forgot to serve the food sent by her and completed serving all other items of food cooked in the Ashram. Bhagavan who would usually beckon to others to start eating and would himself commence doing so, sat silently that day with his left hand under the chin, and his right hand on the leaf. The people there sitting in front began to look at one another and those in the kitchen, or wondering and enquiring in whispers about the possible reason. Suddenly they remembered that the food sent by Echamma had not been served and, when they served it saying, “Oh, we have forgotten,” he gave the formal signal to the others to eat and he too commenced eating the food. It is usual for him to eat with greater relish the raw groundnuts offered to him by a devotee than the highly seasoned sweets and puddings offered by rich people, just as Lord Krishna ate with relish the beaten rice handed over to him by Kuchela.

(Letters)




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Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #71 on: November 01, 2012, 10:17:31 AM »
Bhagavan and one Mudaliar Swami were taking stroll behind the Skandasramam site. There was a huge rock about 15 feet high with a cleft. A shepherdess was standing nearby there crying. Bhagavan asked the reason for her sorrow. She said, "A sheep of mine has slipped the reason for her sorrow. She said. Bhagavan descended into the cleft, took the sheep on his shoulders, climbed up to the surface and delivered the sheep to her. This was a remarkable feat for any human being. Ramana in his kindness did that for the shepherdess.

(ARBOG I, 216)




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Nagaraj

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ஆட்டம் கலைய வெண்டும்
« Reply #72 on: November 01, 2012, 03:31:23 PM »
ஆட்டம் கலைய வெண்டும் ஆடிமுடிந்த பிர -

The play should end and when it is over (you can come here)

I recollect Brahmana Swami gave me  once or twice some books to read - which book it was I do not remember. I do not recollect whether Palaniswami alone lived with Brahmana Swami, visitors like overseer Sheshair used to go to Brahmana Swami often or daily and give him eatables like fruits, I do not remember their questioning Brahmana Swami. I stayed there 3 months being more attracted by the personality of Brahmana Swami rather than by the place. He was so unworldy - full of deep meditation. I thought he was the only person in whom I felt I had a sort of confidence. Since then I went to no other for guidance. He has always been my guiding light. I visited Maharshi some years later in 1908, 1913 (i.e., soon after my marriage in 1912), 1917) (after I returned from Japan), 1923, 1927 etc.

In 1927 I asked Maharshi how long I was to be tossed about in worldly affairs. He said "The play should end (ஆட்டம் கலைய வெண்டும்) and when it is over (ஆடிமுடிந்த பிரகு) you can come here.

The play is not yet over - evidently.

As I happened to visit Madras on account of social or domestic necessities I have called here to see Maharshi.

I tried and began my dhyana in 1900 but got no aid then. Only  after my marriage in  1912 I gained a bit of proficiency in dhyana. I now spend about an hour in dhyana. Swarupa Dhyana of this same Sat Guru in my mind and I see lights while I concentrate and I reported this to Maharshi. He said "The vastu is inside and it is seen there." I have received no other instruction so far as I can remember.

(MV Sundaresa Iyer, ARBOG, I, 167)

« Last Edit: November 01, 2012, 03:34:42 PM by Nagaraj »



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Nagaraj

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It will be all right in the end
« Reply #73 on: November 02, 2012, 10:55:14 AM »
It will be all right in the end

Decades ago, as a student, I used to gaze with admiration at the photo of a youth in a loin cloth before whom my father used to prostrate. The last words of my father before losing consciousness were about Bhagavan and about how eagerly he had been looking forward to spending some years in Sri Ramanasramam. These words were ringing in my ears when I visited Sri Ramanasramam in 1930. I was specially blessed on this occasion as I saw him all alone in the dining hall in the early hours of the morning. I caught hold of his holy feet
as Markandeya caught the lingam and told him about the last words of my father. With tender love beaming out of his eyes, he said that my father had taken leave of him before passing away! When I beseeched him to bless me, he said, “It will be all right in the end”. Those words of benediction have rung in my ears and brought me hope in moments which I cherish in my heart as the most worthwhile event in my life.

(A.K. Ramachandran)




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Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #74 on: November 03, 2012, 06:12:22 PM »
One day about noon, an old tribal woman accosted Bhagavan on one of his rambles on the rough jungle path down the Hill and remarked, "A curse on you! What can't you stay quiet in one place."

Ramana said, "Yes, this is very good advice." and slapped his own cheeks, as if in punishment for not having known what the woman was teaching then.

When first the old woman began abusing him, he could not understand how he deserved it and was sumbfounded as to what offence he could have caused the woman.

About this incident also, Bhagavan said, "It is clear she could not have been an ordinary low caste woman such as are commonly spoken to Swami like that?" Here again many devotees think it was Bhagavan's father, Arunacala, or some Siddha that came in the guise of that Harijan woman and advised him.





“You cannot travel the path until
you have become the path itself”
[