Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 41469 times)

Nagaraj

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Bhagavan & Animals
« Reply #30 on: October 01, 2012, 08:09:01 AM »
A villager had a dream in which he was told to offer his next calf to Ramanasramam. He brought his cow and the calf to Bhagavan. The jungle around the Ashram was thick at that time and there were cheetahs. The Ashram people were perplexed and refused the offer, but the villager was taking his dream seriously and would not take the calf away. The mother cow had to remain with the calf to feed her. Finally, the cow and the calf were entrusted to a devotee in the town. The calf became the famous cow Lakshmi. She grew up and had three calves within a few years. She would come daily to the Ashram to have her meals, graze on the Ashram land, enter the Hall and sit contentedly near Bhagavan. In the evening, she would go back to the town as other women did.

Once Lakshmi came into the Hall. She was pregnant at that time. It was after lunch time when Bhagavan was reading the newspapers. Lakshmi came near and started licking the papers. Bhagavan looked up and said: "Wait a little, Lakshmi." But Lakshmi went on licking. Bhagavan laid his paper aside, put his hands behind Lakshmi's horns and his head against hers. Like this they stayed for quite a long time. I stood nearby looking at the wonderful scene. After some ten minutes or so, Bhagavan turned to me and said: "Do you know what Lakshmi is doing? She is in Samadhi."

I looked at her and tears were flowing in streams down her broad cheeks. Her breathing had stopped and her eyes were fixed on Bhagavan. After some time Bhagavan changed his position and asked: "Lakshmi, how do you feel now?" Lakshmi moved backward, as if reluctant to turn her tail towards Bhagavan, walked round the Hall and went out.

Shantammal,



I looked around. Squatting on the floor or sitting in the Buddha posture or lying prostrate face down, a number of Indians prayed-some of them reciting their mantras out loud. Several small monkeys came into the hall and approached Bhagavan. They climbed onto his couch and broke the stillness with their gay chatter. He loved animals and any kind was respected and welcomed by him in the ashram. They were treated as equals of humans and always addressed by their names. Sick animals were brought to Bhagavan and kept by him on his couch or on the floor beside him until they were well. Many animals had died in his arms. When I was there he had a much-loved cow who wandered in and out of the hall, and often lay down beside him and licked his hand. He loved to tell stories about the goodness of animals. It was remarkable that none of the animals ever fought or attacked each other.

Mercedes de Acosta,



In the roof of the Old Hall, squirrels would build nests. Once, some new-born squirrels dropped on Bhagavan's sofa. Their eyes remained yet unopened and the size of each baby may not have been more than an inch; they were very red in color with fresh flesh, absolutely tender to touch. The mother squirrel ignored them. Now what to do? How to feed and attend to such tender things?

The baby squirrels were in the palm of Bhagavan. Bhagavan's face glowed with love and affection for them. While there was a question mark in the faces of those who surrounded Bhagavan, He Himself was happy and cheerful. He asked for some cotton to be brought. He made a soft bed for them. He also took a bit of cotton and squeezed it to such a tiny end, the end portion looked like a sharp pin. He dipped it in milk and squeezed milk into the tiny mouths. At regular intervals, Bhagavan repeated this act of compassion. He tended them with great care and love till they grew up and ran around. They did not run away, only ran around their 'Mother'. Kinder far than their own mother!

V. Ganesan



Once an Ashram deer was attacked by some animal and the wounds turned from bad to worse. Sri Bhagavan sat near the deer and held its face in his hands, looking at its tearful eyes. Sri Bhagavan sat like that for a couple of hours. Chinnaswami asked my uncle who was standing close to look after the deer and relieve Sri Bhagavan. Sri Bhagavan heard this but did not make any response. Sri Bhagavan sat there till the deer breathed its last. That was the compassion that Sri Bhagavan had for that deer. Soon after, Sri Bhagavan went to the hall. There is a Samadhi for the deer in the Ashram.

From: Dr. K. Subrahmanian,






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Nagaraj

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riding a horse
« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2012, 04:24:46 PM »
The single most powerful memory of those days in my personal experience of Bhagavan occurred one day when I accompanied my mother to the ashram. I was about 5 years old at the time. Bhagavan was sitting on a small pial (raised platform) in the thatched room adjoining the Old Hall. The place is where Bhagavan's samadhi is now. The platform faced east whereas in the Old Hall Bhagavan faced south. My mother prostrated before Bhagavn in the traditional way and I who was standing next to her, suddenly climbed on her back, and sat there as if riding a horse or an elephant. My mother became very angry and tried to push me down. But Bhagavan, seeing my innocent mischief, smiled and enjoyed the fun. He bade my mother not to scold or push but stay in that prostrated posture for a few seconds more. When I recollect this incident I become enthralled at the memory of his beautiful, smiling countenance. He loved children and their playful mischief.

~ D. Rajaram, The Mountain Path,  June, 2003



When Bhagavan was living on the hill, a big monkey came one day when he was having his food, and sat near him. Bhagavan was about to put a morsel of food into his mouth, but when he saw the monkey he gave it the morsel. The monkey took it, put it on the plate and gave Bhagavan a square slap on the cheek. “What do you mean, you fellow? Why are you angry? I gave you the first morsel!” exclaimed Bhagavan. Then he understood his mistake. It was a king monkey and he had to be treated in the right royal manner. Bhagavan called for a separate leaf plate and a full meal was served to the king, who ate it all with dignity and proudly went away.

Ramana Smrti Souvenir



One day the cow Lakshmi came to the Hall. She went straight to Bhagavan, put her head on Bhagavan’s shoulder and wept. Bhagavan sat very quietly and gently stroked her head. “Why are you so sad?” he would whisper in her ears. “Who has hurt you? Cheer up, my dear, stop crying. I am here to befriend you.” Lakshmi stopped crying, gave Bhagavan a few licks and went away, comforted.

Ramana Smrti Souvenir






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Nagaraj

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Adanjada paadinaa
« Reply #32 on: October 02, 2012, 09:28:05 PM »
One day a lady who was well versed in classical music and who was also proficient in playing the Veena , came up with a question to Bhagavan.

“Bhagavan is it possible to attain liberation through music alone or would other spiritual practices be required,?" the lady asked.

Bhagavan remained silent as if to reveal the stillness of the Atman where no music can penetrate.

The lady, unable to understand Bhagavan's silence further queried, “Did not Saint Thyagaraja and other saints attain moksha by singing the praises of God?"

A smile broke forth from Bhagavan. He said,

"Avaallaam, Adayarthukaaga Paadalai, Adanjada paadinaa"

“Thyagaraja and the others did not attain Moksha through their songs but from the ecstasy that sprang forth from within as a result of their realisation of the ultimate. Their songs were just an expression of their blissful state. This was the reason why their music stood the test of time. This is what is called as 'Nadopanishad!"

The astonished lady prostrated to Bhagavan and said, “Bhagavan all these days I have been living with my own misinterpretation of facts and mistaken beliefs. You have illumined me. My doubts have dispelled and my mind is clear and free!"




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Nagaraj

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it is for us to bear and forebear
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2012, 09:00:56 PM »
In 1924 there was a robbery at the Ashram. One summer night Sri Ramana and four of his companions were sleeping in one of the thatched huts near the windows, when they heard thieves trying to climb in through the window. Kunju Swami was furious and wanted to confront the thieves, but Ramana dissuaded him saying,“Let these robbers play their role; we shall stick to ours. Let them do what they like; it is for us to bear and forebear. Let us not interfere with them.” He suggested to the thieves that he and his companions would leave the hut so that they could take whatever they  wanted. But when they came out, the robbers beat them with sticks. They also beat Ramana on his thigh, who said, “If you are not satisfied yet, you may strike the other leg also.” And to Ramakrishna, who wanted to protect him, he said humorously, that he had only received his appropriate puja (puja in Tamil means worship but also beating).

The Ashram inmates waited in the northern hut while the thieves rummaged through everything. The things they found, however, were worth no more than a few rupees. Being extremely disappointed and not willing to believe that this was everything, one of them returned brandishing a stick and threatened, “Where is your money, where do you keep that?” Maharshi answered that there was no money as they were poor sadhus living upon alms.

At two in the morning the thieves finally left and Kunju Swami, who had managed to escape to get help from town, returned accompanied by several policemen. But Ramana was sitting in the northern hall conversing calmly with his disciples about spiritual matters as if nothing had happened.




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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #34 on: October 10, 2012, 11:09:01 AM »
Dear Nagaraj,

What is important here is that when the policemen brought the thieves, Sri Bhagavan said: No one came to steal anything. No one
beat us. No such thing had happened.

karuNaiyAl ennai ANda nee enakku........

Arunachala Siva. 

Nagaraj

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A wounded Dove
« Reply #35 on: October 15, 2012, 01:27:28 PM »
Once somebody brought Bhagavan a wounded dove. Bhagavan held it in his hands for some time and then asked the devotees gathered in the hall, "Who will take good care of this bird until it is quite well?" No offer came. Some time back the Maharani of Baroda had presented a white peacock to the Asramam. and everybody was eager to take charge of it. Bhagavan looked around and started talking to the Dove, "What a pity you are not a peacock. You are a useless little thing, not a costly bird presented by a Maharani. Who wants you? Who will care for you?" The dove was kept in the Asramam in a clumsy cage, became well and flew away. But the lesson of universal compassion remained.

(Chalam)

« Last Edit: October 15, 2012, 01:30:25 PM by Nagaraj »



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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #36 on: October 15, 2012, 02:14:04 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

In another case, on the Hill, when a bird was attacked by a stone from the catapult by a cowherd, the bird was not seriously
injured, but with a shock it fell on Sri Bhagavan's feet. Sri Bhagavan took that bird, asked whether someone has got some
grapes. At that time, someone came with a bunch of grapes, and Sri Bhagavan  crushed one or two grapes and let the juice
fall into the eyes of the bird. The bird opened its eyes, adjusted itself and then flew away!

Incidentally, see this poem of Basvanna:

Like a cow fallen into a guagmire
  I make mouths at this corner and that,

no one to look  for me
or find me

till my Lord sees this beast
and lifts him out by the horns.

O Lord of the meeting rivers!*

O Lord of the meeting rivers!

(* Siva in the temple of Kudlagi, where there is confluence of Tunghabadra and Kaveri.
Hence Siva is called there,  Kudala Sangama Deva, the Lord of meeting rivers!)

Arunachala Siva. 

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #37 on: October 16, 2012, 11:59:45 AM »
While doing work, Bhagavan had a way of teaching the highest wisdom through homely, casual remarks. One night when a vegetable grown in England was being cut, a worker remarked, "how nice it would be if this vegetable could be grown in our Asramam garden!" At once Bhagavan retorted saying, "Where do you think it was grown? That was also our garden. Otherwise how could we get it? Indeed all gardens in the word are our Asramam gardens!" Another time when 'sAmbAr' was being boiled, Bhagavan observed, "It must be boiled fully and all the effervescence must completely subside. Only then will it be good and acquire the right taste."


Notes:

effervescence: the process of bubbling as gas escapes, infers to our ego, mind, etc...




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Nagaraj

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sugar candy to sugar gaNapatI
« Reply #38 on: October 17, 2012, 12:24:10 PM »
In another ofg my darshans of Bhagavan a rich zamindAr came in a car and sat before Ramana in the midst of many devotees, without prostrating to Bhagavan as others usually did. Then he spoke thus to Ramana, "All these people bring fruits or other things to Bhagavan and prostrate before Him. But I don't bring anything, nor do I prostrate. I simply come and sit." At once Bhagavan said, "yes, they bring plantains etc., just like bringing sugar candy to sugar gaNapatI.

(The allusion is to a custom prevailing in India where a bit of jaggery is pinched off from an idol of gaNapatI and offered to gaNapatI. The moral is that we offer to God which rightfully belongs to God)




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Nagaraj

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Oh, It was all staged!
« Reply #39 on: October 18, 2012, 02:03:28 PM »
One day, the attendant Venkataratnam was accompanying Bhagavan up the hill. There is a steep stretch with steps at one particular place on the path from the Asramam to Skandasramam. While climbing down Bhagavan would often manoeuvre this inclined portion by bracing himself on a big rock, planing his stick firmly against the ledge and descending slowly. One day some devotees evidently asked a young booy to wait at this place and approach Bhagavan as he passed, and take hold of his feet. The youngster said to him, "Bhagavan, if you do not gant me mukti, I will not let go of your feet." Apparently the devotees were hiding themselves behind the nearby bushes. Bracing himself with his stick, Bhagavan said, "Adei, it is you who are in a position to give mukti because if you don't let go of my feet, I am going to fall and attain complete release in this very moment." At these words the boy became frightened and took to his heels. Astonished by this strange happening Venkataratnam asked who the boy could have been and what his unusual episode could mean. Bhagavan's ready reply was, "Oh, It was all staged."




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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2012, 03:18:51 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Nice story. Once Sri Bhagavan went for nature's call at night. Some attendant followed Him. Suddenly they head the sound of wooden
slippers. But no one was to be seen. Sri Bhagavan asked: Did you also hear the sound? The attendant became fearful. 
Sri Bhagavan said: Nothing to worry. Some siddha purusha is walking unseen!

Arunachala Siva.   

Nagaraj

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #41 on: October 18, 2012, 04:01:28 PM »
Quote
Once Sri Bhagavan was seen sitting on  stone platform  at night. One sick dog, full of wounds on the body, came to Him and licked
Him all over the body. Sri Bhagavan said: Porum da, Porum..... Next morning, the dog was found dead!

Subramanian Sir,

This incident was narrated by Sri Nochur very passionately in one of his talks, very touching, indeed. It is these small things that really makes Bhagavan so wonderful and so near to heart.

an incident about Bhagavan's closeness to animals. A diseased dog was trying to enter the gates of Ramanashram daily for 3 days. Other dogs and some Ashram people kept driving it away. One night Bhagavan slowly walked out of the hall without disturbing anyone. The person attending him thought he was going to the bathroom and followed him at a distance. After a couple of minutes, when Bhagavan did not return, he went looking for him and heard Bhagavan’s voice saying “Thrupthiyachaa?” “Podhumaa ?” (Is it enough ?, Are you satisfied?). He found Bhagavan squatting next to the diseased dog. The dog was licking Bhagavan all over his body including his face while Bhagavan was talking to the dog with these words. After a few minutes, Bhagavan got up and slept on the cot without bothering to clean himself. Next day morning, the Ashramites found the dog lying dead near the entrance. The dog was holding on to its life to have Bhagavan's Darshan.




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Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #42 on: October 18, 2012, 05:39:21 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Manikkavachagar says:


மெய்யே உன் பொன் அடிகள் கண்டு இன்று வீடு உற்றேன்
உய்ய என் உள்ளத்துள் ஓங்காரமாய் நின்ற
மெய்யா விமலா விடைப்பாகா வேதங்கள்
ஐயா எனவோங்கி ஆழ்ந்து அகன்ற நுண்ணியனே 35

The dog seems to say: O Siva-Ramana!  Today, I could see your golden feet, and attained liberation!

Arunachala Siva. 

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #43 on: October 18, 2012, 06:39:48 PM »
Once somebody brought Bhagavan a wounded dove.  Bhagavan held it in his hands for some time and then asked the devotees gathered in the hall. "Who will take good care of this bird until it is quite well,  No offer came.  Some time back the Maharani of Baroda had presented a white peacock to the Asramam and everybody was eager to take charge of it.  Bhagavan looked around and started talking to the dove, "What a pity you are not a peacock.  You are a mere dove, a useless little thing; not a costly brid presented by a Maharani.  Who wants you?  Who will care for you?"   The dove was kept in the Asramam  in a clumsy cage, became well and flew away.  But the lesson of universal compassion remained.

(from the Boundless Ocean of Grace).
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #44 on: October 18, 2012, 06:57:50 PM »
An Old Telugu man with a long beard, an iron pot and chopper for cutting wood made his abode in the Draupadi temple.  He would beg some food in the town, boil something or other in his  iron pot on a small fire of wood cut with his chopper and eat it during the day.  For hours together he could be seen standing and looking at Bhagavan.  He would spend the night in the temple, which was dilapidated and abandoned and surrounded by jungle.   Once the writer of this piece found him standing all alone in front of the temple and gazing at  Arunachala."I sleep here", he said when the writer asked him what he was doing in the forsaken temple. "What, sleeping here all alone ,   Are you not afraid,"  Exclaimed Chalam.   The old man seemed indignant.  Afraid of what, Bhagavan throws  his light upon me.   All through the night I am surrounded by a blue raidance.  As long as his light is with me, how can I be afraid,"   The incident made Chalam deepply humble.  Bhagavan's love and light was given in full measure to a poor old beggar, while those  who pride themselves on being his chosen disciples are left  high and dry because they have thelsemves to attend to.

Boundless Ocean of Grace
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya