Author Topic: Self Enquiry and Activity  (Read 782 times)

silentgreen

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Self Enquiry and Activity
« on: October 21, 2009, 02:34:50 PM »
Self Enquiry and Activity

An answer from Bhagavan:

#. When there is activity in regard to works, we are neither the agents of those works nor their enjoyers. The activity is of the three instruments, mind, speech and body. Thinking thus, could we remain unattached?

After the mind has been made to stay in the Self which is its deity, and has been rendered indifferent to emperical matters because it does not stray away from the Self, how can the mind think as mentioned above? Do not such thoughts constitute bondage?

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In the above sentence we see a great resemblance between devotional surrender and self enquiry.
Bhagavan refers to Self as the deity. For a devotee, the attitude towards the deity is surrender and finally merging. So here Self is the deity to which the mind needs to surrender. For a devotee, devotion implies constant "rememberance" of the deity in the heart, for vichara it is abidance in the heart.
]


When such thoughts arise due to residual impressions, one should restrain the mind from flowing that way, endeavour to retain it in the Self-state, and make it turn indifferent to emperical matters.

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Here is the self-effort. The effort is more of a preventive nature than like running towards a goal. When thoughts arise, prevent the mind from going that way exclusively and retain it in the Self-state. So the alertness is not to pursue a thread of thought exclusively foregoing the Self-state.
Can work be done then?
Bhagavan says later that works can be done inspite of this practice. So thoughts may arise but one should not pursue it exclusively foregoing the Self. So if Self is compared to the sky and thoughts to the cloud, one should not enter the cloud, be completely enveloped by it and think the cloud is me. One should bring oneself to the native sky state and then watch the cloud.
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One should not give room in the mind for such thoughts as: "Is this good? Or, is that good? Can this be done? Or can that be done?" One should be vigilant even before such thoughts arise and make the mind stay in its native state. If any little room is given, such a disturbed mind will do harm to us while posing as our friends; like the foe appearing to be a friend, it will topple us down.

Is it not because one forgets one's Self that such thoughts arise and cause more and more evil?

[
Bhagavan again emphasizes that one should not forget the Self. Then troubles can start. Self is the deity of the mind. When a devotee forgets his/her deity, the devotee gets lost. So if Self is forgotten, the mind can create its own little world due to latent impressions and mask the Self like a cloud.
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While it is true that to think through discrimination, "I do not do anything; all actions are performed by the instruments" is a means to prevent the mind from flowing along residual thought. Does it not also follow that only if the mind flows along thought vasanas that it must be restrained through discrimination as stated before?

Can the mind that remains in the Self-state think as "I" and as "I behave emperically thus and thus?"

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Bhagavan differentiates staying in Self-state from thinking discriminatory thoughts for mind control. If one is trying to bring inner rest through discriminatory thought, one has already strayed away from Self state. If one remains in the Self state such thoughts need not be thought for bringing inner rest.
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In all manner of ways possible one should endeavour gradually not to forget one's true Self. If that is accomplished, all will be accomplished. The mind should not be directed to any other matter. Even though one may perform, like a mad person, the actions that are the result of the past deeds, one should retain the mind in the Self-state without letting the thought "I do" arise.

Have not countless devotees performed their numerous emperical functions with an attitude of dedication to God?

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The emphasis and other important points. The emphasis is not to forget one's true Self. Then work also is done retaining the mind in the Self-state. Another important point here is that if one works retaining the mind in the Self-state, the "I do" feeling automatically fades because the Self does not assert "I" like an ego. There actions are felt in passive voice "work is being done" instead of active voice "I am doing the work".

The answer starts with devotional connotation (Self as the deity of mind) and ends as well (devotees surrendering their work to God).
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Homage to the Universal Being...Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ... Om Shanti ...