Author Topic: Vegetarian Food and Spiritual Life - 3  (Read 935 times)

Subramanian.R

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Vegetarian Food and Spiritual Life - 3
« on: April 11, 2009, 01:32:37 PM »
For practical purposes, the important question is whether there is
any regime which is suitable for aspirants in general in the conditions of the world today, and if so, what?  Because rules governing action
are not static and for all time, changing conditions of life require new
adaptation, as may be seen, for instance, in the gradual adoption
of vegetarianism in Hinduism. To some extent different religions carry their separate obligations, but there are various indications that for aspirants in general, and certainly for those who are not following the strict orthodoxy of any religion, vegetarianism is indicated.  One quite often meets aspirants who find spontaneously that their path brings them to a point  where they feel an inner aversion to meat or physical inabiltiy to take it.

It so happens that I have just today, while writing this, received a letter mentioning such a case.  "He himself had stopped eating animal food because his body suddenly refused to accept it and he at first   
could not understand and rebelled somewhat until it gradually dawned on him that this might be a sign of spiritual development.

It is also noticeable that most Hindu ashrams, while indifferent to orthodoxy in general to an extent that would have been unthinkable in an earlier age, are very particular about vegetarianism.

Outstanding examples of this are Sri Ramanasramam and Anandashram, the ashram of the late Swami Ramadas. Special food is provided for Western visitors but even this is vegetarian.

[ I have observed that Sri Ramanasramam, has not now been adopting two separate rows for Brahmins and Non brahmins.  If any Vedic pandit wants to eat separately, he can do so in the adjacent room.  Special non-spicy Vegetarian 'rasam' or 'sambhar' is provided for Westerners, if they so wish.]

(Source:  Be Still, it is the wind that sings.  Arthur Osborne.)

Arunachala Siva.