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Messages - matthias

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16
General topics / varanasi
« on: October 08, 2010, 01:53:27 AM »
dear forum,

my travel to northern india comes closer and closer, I will arrive in delhi 13th of october.
I want to go to kathmandu also, and I want to stop in varanasi for a week or so, I thought about asking members of this forum if they know some teachers in varanasi that I could try to see?

the city seems to be very loaded with energy, as far as I can see...I wasnt there jet, but it really fascinates me..

so maybe if you have some ideas, about ashrams that I could visit or temples or a special ghat...whatever let me know...

much love
matthias

17
Forum advice, news & etiquette / Re: SELF INTRODUCTION
« on: October 05, 2010, 01:13:05 PM »
have a warm welcome :)

18
General topics / metta-sutta
« on: September 24, 2010, 01:37:45 PM »
the buddhas instructions of creating a noble and good heart:

This is what should be done
By one who is skilled in goodness,
And who knows the path of peace:
... Wishing: In gladness and in safety,
May all beings be at ease.
   


Whatever living beings there may be;
Whether they are weak or strong, omitting none,
The great or the mighty,
medium, short or small,
   


The seen and the unseen,
Those living near and far away,
Those born and to-be-born —
May all beings be at ease!
   


Let none deceive another,
Or despise any being in any state.
Let none through anger or ill-will
Wish harm upon another.
   



Even as a mother protects with her life
Her child, her only child,
So with a boundless heart
Should one cherish all living beings;
   



Radiating kindness over the entire world
Spreading upwards to the skies,
And downwards to the depths;
Outwards and unbounded,
Freed from hatred and ill-will.
   


Whether standing or walking, seated or lying down
Free from drowsiness,
One should sustain this recollection.
This is said to be the sublime abiding....[40]


19
General topics / Re: No Self
« on: September 21, 2010, 01:06:51 PM »
sure, whatever works works:)

the buddha didnt gave much ideas about nirvana, or what is real or unreal, whenever it came to this topics he remaind in silence :)

If you study and practice buddhism alittle bit (shamata vipassana or something like this) you should read this book, it is for free, just print it and read it, it will save you many years of wrong practice and hardship, its from an american buddhist monk who took a closer look to the sutras, and changed shamata vipassana to be more in tune with the buddhas teaching...very nice book

http://www.dhammasukha.org/Study/Books/Pdf/The%20Anapanasati%20Sutta%202.pdf

much love
matthias


20
General topics / Re: No Self
« on: September 20, 2010, 12:14:44 PM »
dear kde

let me try to explain the buddhist terminology.

in therevada (in the suttas or sutras) life has three characteristics: anicca, dukkha, anatta

anicca=impermanence: there is nothing that stays the same in samsara, everything is contantly chaning, nothing permanent here you see, one time in meditation you expereince bliss, after meditation its gone, one time your girlfriend makes you upset, one time happy, no phenomena is permanent.

dukkha=suffering: problem is we thing there is something permanent :) so we cling to this things and think they give us happiness, in fact they wont, so we suffer

and anatta (pali for skt.: anatman)=no self: you see everything always is in movement, flower grows and dies, thought comes and goes, our body transforms; now you look different then 20 years ago or not? So why think there is a personality somewhere? anatman means there is no persona anywhere, everything is without core or fixed point of reference that you could call a "permanent" self...why? because if you look there is no permanent self anywhere..everything changes

thats one way to explain, you also could say: look at this flower, it is a flower but its made of "non" flower parts: earth, sunshine, water, its constructed of things that are noflower...this is the thought of interdependence, other way to explain noself is to show that there is no part of a single phenomena that is not a composition of other things :)

here si alot of information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatman


thats traditional thought, nagarjuna the great buddhist scholar explains this a little different and then you have mahayana buddhism..

and the tantric or vajrayana buddhism doesnt speak so much about htis things, they speak about mahasukkha (great bliss) or clear light.

if you examine closely there is a fundamental differnce between buddhist teaching and vedanta, but also alot of familarites, I think studding both is very good for spiritual development but if you want to practice, just one path :)

much love
matthias

21
Humour / PETRUS!!
« on: September 18, 2010, 06:43:45 PM »
chögyam trungpa rinpoche was a very excentric and crazy buddhist teacher who started to teach tantric buddhism in the west, he loved humour and alcohol.

this is the first thing he told his student after waking up from a coma caused from drinking to much.....(its my recollection so not his words)

thats what he said from his hospital bed:

picture jerusalem, christ is nailed to the cross on top of calvary-hill, there are many soldiers surrounding the cross to keep away the devotees of christ who are weeping and screaming in agony because their master is diing because of human ignorance...

petrus who denied to be a devotee of jesus for three times was in the back hiding from the scene...

suddenly Jesus screams in some sort of trance:

PEEEETTRRRRUUUSSSS!

petrus was terribly shocked and of course remembered his denial, he tried to break through the soldiers to confess his denial to christ, but hte soldiers knocked him back...

and Jesus screamed again for him:

PEEEEEETRUUUSS!

petrus now almost blind of pain, tries it again...but the solders stop him nearly before he could come to him


Jesus screams one last time

PEEETTRRRUUUSSS!

and petrus manages to break free and falls on his knees under the cross, tears in his eyes..
with a shacky voice he asks his master:

"yes my lord?"

and jesus says: "I can see your house from here."


I love this joke :)



22
General topics / 9/11
« on: September 11, 2010, 07:39:27 PM »
Rest In Peace

by Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat
inspired by the poems of Thich Nhat Hanh

        I am a World Trade Center tower, standing tall in the clear blue sky, feeling a violent blow in my side, and
        I am a towering inferno of pain and suffering imploding upon myself and collapsing to the ground.
        May I rest in peace.

        I am a terrified passenger on a hijacked airplane not knowing where we are going or that I am riding on fuel tanks that will be instruments of death, and
        I am a worker arriving at my office not knowing that in just a moment my future will be obliterated.
        May I rest in peace.

        I am a pigeon in the plaza between the two towers eating crumbs from someone's breakfast when fire rains down on me from the skies, and
        I am a bed of flowers admired daily by thousands of tourists now buried under five stories of rubble.
        May I rest in peace.

        I am a firefighter sent into dark corridors of smoke and debris on a mission of mercy only to have it collapse around me, and
        I am a rescue worker risking my life to save lives who is very aware that I may not make it out alive.
        May I rest in peace.

        I am a survivor who has fled down the stairs and out of the building to safety who knows that nothing will ever be the same in my soul again, and
        I am a doctor in a hospital treating patients burned from head to toe who knows that these horrible images will remain in my mind forever.
        May I know peace.

        I am a tourist in Times Square looking up at the giant TV screens thinking I'm seeing a disaster movie as I watch the Twin Towers crash to the ground, and
        I am a New York woman sending e-mails to friends and family letting them know that I am safe.
        May I know peace.

        I am a piece of paper that was on someone's desk this morning and now I'm debris scattered by the wind across lower Manhattan, and
        I am a stone in the graveyard at Trinity Church covered with soot from the buildings that once stood proudly above me, death meeting death.
        May I rest in peace.

        I am a dog sniffing in the rubble for signs of life, doing my best to be of service, and
        I am a blood donor waiting in line to make a simple but very needed contribution for the victims.
        May I know peace.

        I am a resident in an apartment in downtown New York who has been forced to evacuate my home, and
        I am a resident in an apartment uptown who has walked 100 blocks home in a stream of other refugees.
        May I know peace.

        I am a family member who has just learned that someone I love has died, and
        I am a pastor who must comfort someone who has suffered a heart-breaking loss.
        May I know peace.

        I am a loyal American who feels violated and vows to stand behind any military action it takes to wipe terrorists off the face of the earth, and
        I am a loyal American who feels violated and worries that people who look and sound like me are all going to be blamed for this tragedy.
        May I know peace.

        I am a frightened city dweller who wonders whether I'll ever feel safe in a skyscraper again, and
        I am a pilot who wonders whether there will ever be a way to make the skies truly safe.
        May I know peace.

        I am the owner of a small store with five employees that has been put out of business by this tragedy, and
        I am an executive in a multinational corporation who is concerned about the cost of doing business in a terrorized world.
        May I know peace.

        I am a visitor to New York City who purchases postcards of the World Trade Center Twin Towers that are no more, and
        I am a television reporter trying to put into words the terrible things I have seen.
        May I know peace.

        I am a boy in New Jersey waiting for a father who will never come home, and
        I am a boy in a faraway country rejoicing in the streets of my village because someone has hurt the hated Americans.
        May I know peace.

        I am a general talking into the microphones about how we must stop the terrorist cowards who have perpetrated this heinous crime, and
        I am an intelligence officer trying to discern how such a thing could have happened on American soil, and
        I am a city official trying to find ways to alleviate the suffering of my people.
        May I know peace.

        I am a terrorist whose hatred for America knows no limit and I am willing to die to prove it, and
        I am a terrorist sympathizer standing with all the enemies of American capitalism and imperialism, and
        I am a master strategist for a terrorist group who planned this abomination.
        My heart is not yet capable of openness, tolerance, and loving.
        May I know peace.

        I am a citizen of the world glued to my television set, fighting back my rage and despair at these horrible events, and
        I am a person of faith struggling to forgive the unforgivable, praying for the consolation of those who have lost loved ones, calling upon the merciful beneficence of God/Yahweh/Allah/Spirit/Higher Power.
        May I know peace.

        I am a child of God who believes that we are all children of God and we are all part of each other.
        May we all know peace.

23
General topics / Re: Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta
« on: September 11, 2010, 06:25:58 PM »
this american monk explains the sutra in the best way I think. very clear and easy to understand, and his teachings seem to correspond with the words and meditaiton instrucitons of the buddha...

I incorperated it into my own meditaiton and it really makes a great differnce what this man has to say..

so maybe someone enjoys this too:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1525978068254054348#docid=-628726703199491936

24
General topics / Re: Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta
« on: September 09, 2010, 09:59:55 PM »
dear silentgreen

for me this sutta contains the "contemplative" aspect of buddhas teachings, its much longer then this short excerpt, but anyway when i read it for the first time, it just contained so much wisdom and touched me very deeply (existentially), and the wisdom is down to earth...

just a very clear explanation of mindfullness as you said.

I wanted to share this because it was a very important text for myself, so I thought maybe it could be benefitial for others too.


25
General topics / Mahāsatipatthāna Sutta
« on: September 08, 2010, 06:25:27 PM »
this is the first section of this very beautifull teaching of the buddha, please read it carefully....



Thus have I heard:

At one time the Enlightened One was staying among the Kurus at Kammāsadhamma, a market town of the Kuru people. There the Enlightened One addressed the monks thus: "Monks,"1 and they replied, "Venerable Sir!" Then the Enlightened One spoke as follows:

This is the one and only way, monks, for the purification of beings, for the overcoming of sorrow and lamentation, for the extinguishing of suffering and grief, for walking on the path of truth, for the realisation of nibbāna: that is to say, the fourfold establishing of awareness.2

Which four? Here, monks, a monk dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, 3 observing body in body, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing sensations in sensations, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing mind in mind, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter]; he dwells ardent with awareness and constant thorough understanding of impermanence, observing mental contents in mental contents, having removed craving and aversion towards the world [of mind and matter].4

And how, monks, does a monk dwell observing body in body?

Here a monk, having gone into the forest, or to the foot of a tree, or to an empty room, sits down cross-legged, keeps his body upright and fixes his awareness in the area around the mouth. With this awareness, he breathes in, with this awareness, he breathes out. Breathing in a deep breath, he understands properly:5 "I am breathing in a deep breath." Breathing out a deep breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a deep breath." Breathing in a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing in a shallow breath." Breathing out a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a shallow breath." In this way he trains himself: "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe in." "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe in," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself.

Just as a skilful turner or a turner’s apprentice, while making a long turn understands properly: "I am making a long turn," and while making a short turn, understands properly: "I am making a short turn," just so, the monk, breathing in a deep breath, understands properly: "I am breathing in a deep breath." Breathing in a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing in a shallow breath." Breathing out a deep breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a deep breath." Breathing out a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a shallow breath." In this way he trains himself: "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe in." "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe in," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself.

Thus6 he dwells observing body in body internally, or he dwells observing body in body externally, or he dwells observing body in body both internally and externally.7 Thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising in the body, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of passing away in the body, thus he dwells observing the phenomenon of arising and passing away in the body. Now his awareness is established: "This is body!"8 Thus he develops his awareness to such an extent that there is mere understanding along with mere awareness.9 In this way he dwells detached, without clinging towards anything in the world [of mind and matter]. This is how, monks, a monk dwells observing body in body.

etc.

26
General topics / great joy
« on: September 05, 2010, 08:57:29 PM »


All formations are impermanent.
They are subject to birth and death.
But remove the notions of birth and death,
and this silence is called great joy.


---classical buddhist gatha

thats indeed the whole teachigns of the buddha, and all other buddhas

27
dear viswanathan

Iam not directly affected, Iam 24 years old, and I dont know of any cases in my family, but I assume my grnadgrand-parents were nazis.

that doesnt matter you see, I have a strong connection to this topic, and I cried alot when I first heard about it, my girlfriend said that it may be possible, that I died in a KZ in my previous incanraiton, because I really creid like crazy when I first realized the intensety of what was going on there...

of yourse it is also shivas dance, or the natural display of mind, but what I know and saw in teachers is that the more they understand their true nature the more they can relate and feel with everything that is happening...their heart is open and deep like an ocean, and I dont think any teacher would react on the holocaust with something like: its illusion, realize your true nature...at least not as the first sentence, the stories of bhagawan that I read show me that he would cry together with them...

such souls would feel this pain with all parts of their body, mind and soul, thats my humble opinion

28
I read alot about nazi-germany and what happened here in austria, I know the lines in chadwicks book, and he also says he heard that bhagawan said that, but he is not sure...anyway, this line is very important, because i dont think he said something like that, if he did then I would give him some pictures and books about the matter to educate him....

because i also know from chadwicks book how he related to his disciples in the most loving way, laughing with them, and criing with them...

the thing is that what happened in nazi-germany is such an unbeliveable cruelty...it should make our heart stop...

I will tell a story:

think of 3 guys in SS uniform wandering over the muddy fields of ausschwitz (arround 1,1 million human beeings died here), they see a little jewish boy, one of the 3 SS guys graps the littel boy on one of his feet and casts him in the air, another of the 3 will shoot the boy dead.

that was daily activity down there..when someone reads the traditional accounts of hell realms, and reads about ausschwitz he has found hell on earth...70 years ago my friends....not 700 years 70 years....not long ago

please read some books, watch some movies, think about what happened there, pray that this will never happen again...and stop talking so much crap in this forum...it breaks my heart, every 3 month someone starts with Hitler in this forum and the whole discussion about this matter jsut shows that a theoretical understanding of non duality is far away of realisation....

and that intellect and heart are two totally different things

29
ok it is easy, but then why is the city of samsara full of people?

30
the thing for my little self is that if I practice anapanassati as the buddha called it (I think the meditation on the breath is one of the oldest), my mind becomes natural, not still...natural, here and now

this is a good basis for atma vichara....in the 4 pillars the buddha discibes this meditation and how ht emind should be used...and you see this is very similar like atma vichara...but a greater emphasis on watching the content of mind

the buddha teached this meditation to gain perfect enlightment...so it is in itself a method that leads to liberation...

it works with the 5th skanda...conciousness...the energy that clings to feelings, thoughts, sensations, situations and forms a story out of it...it starts to work there and goes all the way down to the first skandha, where duality is born...so it works from the bounery to the center

for me atma vichara as it is described is working directly with the first skandha "form", because this quesiton is fundamental and is in a way the content of the first skandha, because here the "person" freezes the boundless space he is, and has a blackout, he/she simply forgets that he:

1. is boundless space

2. created duality himself...

so if one starts to ask "who am I" it directly moves the awereness to this boundery, to htis moment of ignorance (this blackout) as it is called in buddhism...

but this move is very subtle, and powerfull...so a meditaiton to still and prepair the mind is, I think a good thing to do...

but this is my humble opinion, and I wanted to share it because the first lines of hte text are very challenging :)

I quote it:

To remain without the notion of "I" to form is ultimate Liberation!
The method is easy, every time such a notion forms, withdraw it into Consciousness.
into the heart.


to say it is very easy is missleading, and to say it is hard also...or not?

much love
matthias

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