Author Topic: Buddhist Teachings and Practices  (Read 5083 times)

Jewell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6548
  • Love,always love and only love
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #30 on: November 08, 2019, 03:20:56 AM »

All compounded things are impermanent,
strive on heedfully!

Gautama Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #31 on: November 10, 2019, 06:15:01 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #32 on: November 10, 2019, 11:17:54 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2019, 10:03:23 PM »
One day the Buddha held up a flower in front of an audience of 1,250 monks and nuns. He did not say anything for quite a long time. The audience was perfectly silent. Everyone seemed to be thinking hard, trying to see the meaning behind the Buddha?s gesture.

Then, suddenly, the Buddha smiled. He smiled because someone in the audience smiled at him and at the flower. The name of that monk was Mahakashyapa. He was the only person who smiled, and the Buddha smiled back and said, ?I have a treasure of insight, and I have transmitted it to Mahakashyapa.?

That story has been discussed by many generations of Zen students, and people continue to look for its meaning. To me the meaning is quite simple. When someone holds up a flower and shows it to you, he wants you to see it. If you keep thinking, you miss the flower. The person who was not thinking, who was just himself, was able to encounter the flower in depth, and he smiled.

That is the problem of life. If we are not fully ourselves, truly in the present moment, we miss everything. When a child presents himself to you with his smile, if you are not really there?thinking about the future or the past, or preoccupied with other problems?then the child is not really there for you. The technique of being alive is to go back to yourself in order for the child to appear like a marvelous reality. Then you can see him smile and you can embrace him in your arms."

- Thich Nhat Hanh, Peace Is Every Step
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #34 on: November 20, 2019, 03:12:39 PM »
The Fourteen Precepts of Engaged Buddhism

1. Do not be idolatrous about or bound to any doctrine, theory, or ideology, even Buddhist ones. Buddhist systems of thought are guiding means; they are not absolute truth.

2. Do not think the knowledge you presently possess is changeless, absolute truth. Avoid being narrow minded and bound to present views.

Learn and practice non attachment from views in order to be open to receive others' viewpoints. Truth is found in life and not merely in conceptual knowledge.

Be ready to learn throughout your entire life and to observe reality in yourself and in the world at all times.

3. Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education.

However, through compassionate dialogue, help others renounce fanaticism and narrow-mindedness.

4. Do not avoid suffering or close your eyes before suffering. Do not lose awareness of the existence of suffering in the life of the world.

Find ways to be with those who are suffering, including personal contact, visits, images and sounds. By such means, awaken yourself and others to the reality of suffering in the world.

5. Do not accumulate wealth while millions are hungry. Do not take as the aim of your life fame, profit, wealth, or sensual pleasure.

Live simply and share time, energy, and material resources with those who are in need.

6. Do not maintain anger or hatred. Learn to penetrate and transform them when they are still seeds in your consciousness.

As soon as they arise, turn your attention to your breath in order to see and understand the nature of your hatred.

7. Do not lose yourself in dispersion and in your surroundings. Practice mindful breathing to come back to what is happening in the present moment.

Be in touch with what is wondrous, refreshing, and healing both inside and around you. Plant seeds of joy, peace, and understanding in yourself in order to facilitate the work of transformation in the depths of your consciousness.

8. Do not utter words that can create discord and cause the community to break. Make every effort to reconcile and resolve all conflicts, however small.

9. Do not say untruthful things for the sake of personal interest or to impress people. Do not utter words that cause division and hatred.

Do not spread news that you do not know to be certain. Do not criticize or condemn things of which you are not sure. Always speak truthfully and constructively.

Have the courage to speak out about situations of injustice, even when doing so may threaten your own safety.

10. Do not use the Buddhist community for personal gain or profit, or transform your community into a political party.

A religious community, however, should take a clear stand against oppression and injustice and should strive to change the situation without engaging in partisan conflicts.

11. Do not live with a vocation that is harmful to humans and nature. Do not invest in companies that deprive others of their chance to live. Select a vocation that helps realise your ideal of compassion.

12. Do not kill. Do not let others kill. Find whatever means possible to protect life and prevent war.

13. Possess nothing that should belong to others. Respect the property of others, but prevent others from profiting from human suffering or the suffering of other species on Earth.

14. Do not mistreat your body. Learn to handle it with respect. Do not look on your body as only an instrument.

Preserve vital energies (sexual, breath, spirit) for the realisation of the Way. (For brothers and sisters who are not monks and nuns) Sexual expression should not take place without love and commitment.

In sexual relations, be aware of future suffering that may be caused. To preserve the happiness of others, respect the rights and commitments of others.

Be fully aware of the responsibility of bringing new lives into the world. Meditate on the world into which you are bringing new beings."


~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Interbeing: Fourteen Guidelines for Engaged Buddhism (Interbeing)


However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #35 on: November 26, 2019, 01:21:06 PM »
?We have to learn the art of stopping - stopping our thinking, our habit energies, our forgetfulness, the strong emotions that rule us. When an emotion rushes through us like a storm, we have no peace. We turn on the TV and then we turn it off. We pick up a book and then we put it down. How can we stop this state of agitation? How How can we stop our fear, despair, anger, and craving? We can stop by practicing mindful breathing, mindful walking, mindful smiling, and deep looking in order to understand. When we are mindful, touching deeply the present moment, the fruits are always understanding, acceptance, love, and the desire to relieve suffering and bring joy.?

~ Thich Nhat Hanh, The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #36 on: December 01, 2019, 06:39:30 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #37 on: December 01, 2019, 06:43:18 PM »
?Just by breathing deeply on your anger, you will calm it. You are being mindful of your anger, not suppressing it?touching it with the energy of mindfulness. You are not denying it at all. When I speak about this to psychotherapists, I have some difficulty. When I say that anger makes us suffer, they take it to mean that anger is something negative to be removed. But I always say that anger is an organic thing, like love. Anger can become love. Our compost can become a rose. If we know how to take care of our compost?Anger is the same. It can be negative when we do not know how to handle it, but if we know how to handle our anger, it can be very positive. We do not need to throw anything away,?

Thich Nhat Hanh
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #38 on: December 02, 2019, 09:44:04 PM »
Enlightenment is not a matter of time. By practicing awareness, by breathing or by walking, we learn to breathe like a Buddha, to walk like a Buddha. If you practice correctly, you will learn to be a Buddha, and it will be very simple and natural.

At first you will be just a part-time Buddha, but gradually you will become a full-time Buddha. Sometimes you will again become a part-time Buddha again; but with constant practice, you will return to being a full-time Buddha.

You can become a Buddha anywhere and at any time. It is funny!

Thich Nhat Hanh.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #39 on: December 02, 2019, 09:47:43 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #40 on: December 03, 2019, 09:23:49 AM »
Nourishment and Healing
Aware of the suffering caused by unmindful consumption, I am committed to cultivating good health, both physical and mental, for myself, my family, and my society by practicing mindful eating, drinking, and consuming. I will practice looking deeply into how I consume the Four Kinds of Nutriments, namely edible foods, sense impressions, volition, and consciousness. I am determined not to gamble, or to use alcohol, drugs, or any other products which contain toxins, such as certain websites, electronic games, TV programs, films, magazines, books, and conversations. I will practice coming back to the present moment to be in touch with the refreshing, healing and nourishing elements in me and around me, not letting regrets and sorrow drag me back into the past nor letting anxieties, fear, or craving pull me out of the present moment. I am determined not to try to cover up loneliness, anxiety, or other suffering by losing myself in consumption. I will contemplate interbeing and consume in a way that preserves peace, joy, and well-being in my body and consciousness, and in the collective body and consciousness of my family, my society and the Earth.
(5/5 Mindfulness Training - Plum Village)
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #41 on: December 03, 2019, 06:46:08 PM »
"To live alone does not mean to reject the world and society. The Buddha said the living alone means living in the present moment deeply observing what is happening. If we do that, we will not be dragged into the past or swept away into thoughts about the future."
~ Thich Nhat Hanh, Our Appointment with Life
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #42 on: December 04, 2019, 12:04:45 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #43 on: December 04, 2019, 07:41:57 PM »
Letting go comes from having a ?nonjudgmental? outlook towards life and people. It allows us to forgive others and ourselves equally for mistakes and incompatibility. In more secular and practical terms, we must be willing to let go of fear, pain, anger, and people. It is the ability to let go that drives a constant process of change?it is what makes us flexible and adaptable. This is hardly easy, takes a conscious effort, and is something I know I struggle with everyday.

Slowing Down

Drink your tea slowly and reverently, as if it is the axis on which the world earth revolves?slowly, evenly, without rushing toward the future. Live the actual moment.

?Thich Nhat Hanh
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2483
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #44 on: December 05, 2019, 10:46:55 AM »
?To dwell in the here and now does not mean you
never think about the past or responsibly plan
for the future. The idea is simply not to allow
yourself to get lost in regrets about the past
or worries about the future. If you are firmly
grounded in the present moment, the past can be
an object of inquiry, the object of your
mindfulness and concentration. You can attain
many insights by looking into the past. But you
are still grounded in the present moment.?

~ Thich Nhat Hanh, The Art of Power
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha