Author Topic: Buddhist Teachings and Practices  (Read 3928 times)

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #15 on: August 06, 2018, 10:42:24 AM »
Impulse is the compulsion to take action on the basis of your feelings of desire and aversion, thus accumulating karma; impulse is therefore the architect of saṃsāra and nirvāṇa.

Completely enslaved by impulse, you have been wandering from one life to the next since beginningless time. Yet if you realize that the nature of impulse is void, and that your endless impulses are in truth the myriad facets of wisdom, you will no longer be subject to their dominion.

~ Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche - The heart treasure of the enlightened ones - Shambhala Publications

However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2019, 03:38:36 PM »
The Buddha's original teaching is essentially a matter of four points -- the Four Noble Truths:

1. Anguish is everywhere.

2. We desire permanent existence of ourselves and for our loved ones, and we desire to prove ourselves independent of others and superior to them. These desires conflict with the way things are: nothing abides, and everything and everyone depends upon everything and everyone else. This conflict causes our anguish, and we project this anguish on those we meet.

3. Release from anguish comes with the personal acknowledgment and resolve: we are here together very briefly, so let us accept reality fully and take care of one another while we can.

4. This acknowledgement and resolve are realized by following the Eightfold Path: Right Views, Right Thinking, Right Speech, Right Conduct, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Recollection, and Right Meditation. Here "Right" means "correct" or "accurate" -- in keeping with the reality of impermanence and interdependence.

~ Robert Aitken Roshi, "The Dragon Who Never Sleeps: Verses for Zen Buddhist Practice"
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2019, 08:34:59 PM »
~ Thich Nhat Hanh ~
I think when people listen to the teachings of the four noble truths, they hear the words ill - being and suffering, and they think that Buddhism is only about suffering. But they don't know that the third noble truth is about happiness, the opposite of suffering. There is suffering, but there is also the cessation of suffering, which means happiness and there is a path leading to happiness. Maybe it would be good to put the second two noble truths first. The first truth would be happiness and the second truth would be the path leading to happiness. Then the third truth would be suffering and the fourth would be the causes of suffering.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Beloved Abstract

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 282
    • View Profile
    • David Ford Art
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2019, 08:38:38 AM »
Thich Nhat Hanh ~
I think ..... ahhhhh .... theres the problem .... lol
simply stop telling the story of the self and see who you are without it

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2019, 03:45:27 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2019, 03:46:53 PM »


However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #21 on: August 11, 2019, 09:19:37 AM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #22 on: August 28, 2019, 02:48:50 PM »
We have a habit of running after things, and this habit has been transmitted to us by our parents and ancestors. We don?t feel fulfilled in the here and now, and so we run after all kinds of things we think will make us happier. We sacrifice our life chasing after objects of craving or striving for success in our work or studies. We chase after our life?s dream and yet lose ourselves along the way. We may even lose our freedom and happiness in our efforts to be mindful, to be healthy, to relieve suffering in the world, or to get enlightened. We disregard the wonders of the present moment, thinking that heaven and the ultimate are for later, not for now.

To practice meditation means to have the time to look deeply and see these things. If you feel restless in the here and now, or you feel ill at ease, you need to ask yourself: ?What am I longing for?? ?What am I searching for?? ?What am I waiting for??

- Thich Nhat Hanh, in ?The Art of Living?.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #23 on: September 06, 2019, 09:35:59 AM »
Bringing the mind to stillness is easy. You need only to pay attention to one thing. As long as your mind is listening to the rain it is not thinking about anything else. You don?t need to try to still your mind. You need only to relax and continue listening to the rain. The longer you are able to do so, the more still your mind becomes.

Sitting in stillness like this allows us to see things as they truly are. When the body is relaxed and the mind comes to rest, we can see clearly. We become as still and clear as the water in a mountain lake whose tranquil surface reflects the blue sky above, the clouds, and the surrounding rocky peaks just as they are.

- Thich Nhat Hanh, in ?The Art of Living?.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Jewell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6522
  • Love,always love and only love
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2019, 06:28:25 AM »
Mahamudra, the royal way, is free
from every word and sacred symbol.
For you alone, beloved Naropa,
this wonderful song springs forth from Tilopa
as spontaneous friendship that never ends.

The completely open nature
of all dimensions and events
is a rainbow always occurring
yet never grasped.
The way of Mahamudra
creates no closure.
No strenuous mental effort
can encounter this wide open way.
The effortless freedom of awareness
moves naturally along it. 

Tilopa 

Jewell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6522
  • Love,always love and only love
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2019, 04:49:37 AM »
All worldly pursuits have but one unavoidable and inevitable end,
which is sorrow; acquisitions end in dispersion;
buildings in destruction; meetings in separation; births in death.
Knowing this, one should, from the very first,
renounce acquisitions and storing-up, and building,
 and meeting; and,
faithful to the commands of an eminent Guru,
set about realizing the Truth.
That alone is the best of religious observances.

Milarepa 

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2395
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2019, 08:44:35 AM »
"The Buddha said that if we?re not attentive, if we don?t bring all our hearts and minds, our whole being, into studying the Sutras and listening to the Dharma, we may understand them in the wrong way.

Liberation is only possible when we are capable of correcting our impressions.

Teachings, ideas, are like a match. The match brings about the flame, which is insight. A teaching, a notion, is not the insight.

But if we practice, we can produce the living insight, the living wisdom.

Many of us, including quite a few Buddhist scholars, are caught by words and concepts. We stick to the words, the doctrine, the teaching, and we are not free; we become dogmatic. But once we have the insight, it burns away our ideas and notions, just as the flame burns the match that brought it into being.

We should never consider any teaching or ideology to be the absolute truth; it is only a means to gaining insight. We should not kill or be killed because of an idea.

If we become dogmatic, we can become a dictator, wanting everyone to accept what we say, believing that we have the truth and that whoever doesn?t agree with us is our enemy. This creates more war, conflict, and discrimination. Most wars have been born from fanaticism, being caught in religion or ideologies.

This teaching of the Buddha, non-attachment to views, is a deep practice of peace. We are ready to release our view in order to gain the insight.

That is also the spirit of science. If a scientist is attached to a finding and thinks it to be the absolute truth, he has no hope of finding something deeper, something higher.

We have to burn up all notions, in order for the insight to be there.

A true practitioner is never dogmatic, never clings to ideas and notions, but makes use of them to produce insight, Right View."

Thich Nhat Hanh, page 66, Thundering Silence: Sutra on Knowing the Better Way to Catch a Snake, 2009 Parallax Press.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Jewell

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6522
  • Love,always love and only love
    • View Profile
Re: Buddhist Teachings and Practices
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2019, 09:10:40 PM »

Abundance grows from the seed of Gratitude.

Buddhist quote