Author Topic: Enlightenment - Revellng in the Eternal Experience: July - Sept. 2016 of M.P.  (Read 45 times)

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 41842
    • View Profile
The above article is by Swami Tanmayananda Saraswati.

*

The Magnificence of Pratyabhijnaa, the Experiential Awakening.

Preamble:

In the last issue, we saw how Bhagavan Ramana in His dialogues with seekers in Talks
with Sri Ramana Maharshi shed light on the real nature of the so called Enlightenment
and the principal means to unravel its mystery.  We discovered the paradoxical truth that though He was recognized as a great Sage of modern times who perpetually
dwelt in the Sahaja Samadhi, He was consistently engaged in demystifying the nature of spiritual Awakening, called Pratyabhijnaa.

Rendered as 'Recognition of the Self', this accurate translation does simplify the meaning of the term in the linguistic sense.  Lest we construe this recognition as merely an intellectual appreciation of the higher Truth as revealed in the Upanishads,
we would do well to recall an anecdote in Lord Buddha's life.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     


   

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 41842
    • View Profile
When Buddha attained Enlightenment under the Bodhi tree in Bodhgaya and then proceeded to Saranath for delivering his first sermon that commenced his life long spiritual ministry, people were awe struck by his unearthly effulgence.  Wondering whether he was a divinity descended on earth, they queried him as to who he was, for
he seemed far too godly to be one among them.

The Buddha answered with a prescience and simplicity that he was neither a Deva,
nor a visitation or apparition from any other celestial domain and was much a normal human being as they were but the perceived difference lay in his awakened to the Reality of his true nature.  Thus he came to be called the Buddha, meaning 'the Awakened One'. Such was the spell he cast that multitudes of seekers and animals too stood transfixed in his powerful presence of Self absorption.  Even the elements of nature like plants and trees reportedly became still in his vicinity.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 41842
    • View Profile
Defining the One True Experience:

Such a phenomenon was observed in Bhagavan Ramana's Sannidhi (presence) too.
As Paul Brunton wrote with compelling beauty, words lost their narrow grip and relevance, and the mind lost its habitual infatuation with the thinking process in His Presence. All the profound questions Brunton carefully had gathered lost their urgency. This illustrates the power of Pratyabhijnaa and the spontaneous consequences of it as an Experiential Awakening. (see Ulladu Narpadu, Anubandham, Verse 29).

In the graphic, yet matter of fact description of His Death Experience, Bhagavan Ramana reveals the riveting attention brought upon the Self shining as the spiritual Heart, in the wake of His intense inquiry that lasted perhaps less than half an hour.
In the aftermath of this transformative Awakening, His life long dwelling on the witnessing Presence without a pause during all the external changes of His physical existence, bore testimony to the magnificence of Pratyabhijnaa, extolled as such in the sacred lore.         

Later Bhagavan defined such an abiding Self Awareness as the only True Experience,
(anubhava), being eternal, changeless and self luminous.  He averred that it is a misnomer to call all 'perceptions and feelings' in the empirical plane (that fall within the purview of sensory and mental domains, indriya-maanasa-pratyaksha) as 'experiences'.  (Talks No. 92 and 469).  For, they are entirely dependent on the Self which illuminates them by virtue of being pure consciousness.  Self Experience (Saakshi Pratyaksha) is truly the 'mother of all relative/empirical experiences', which are mere cognitions (Prateeti) and do not qualify as 'experience' per se.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 41842
    • View Profile
A Quick Recap of Part One:

We saw in the last issue that Bhagavan constantly reiterated two principal insights:
Firstly, understand the nature of Realization to be the Essence of one's own Reality and secondly, devote yourself to the unremitting practice of Self Abidance as the very means to recognize that Reality as the Self.  These two strains of Bhagavan's teachings were then elucidated as the 'know why' and 'know how' stages in the practice of Self inquiry. The first strain of Bhagavan's teaching pertains to clarity in the understanding of Vichara Marga in its subtler aspects and therefore this would correspond to Paroksha Jnanam (as it is derived from a thorough analysis of the 'know why' stage.)

After successfully assimilating this, a Mumukshu is expected not to rest on mere comprehension of the path (and indulging in preaching to others) but is advised by Bhagavan to plunge sincerely into the second stage of actual practice of Atma Nishtaa (Self abidance), which is called Jagrat-Sushupti during the period of Abhyasa (which corresponds to the 'know how stage). (Talks 227). Bhagavan states that this alone can eventually bestow Aparoksha Jnanam (direct knowledge) that releases the seeker from the travails of Samsara. (Ulladu Narpadu, Verse 22 and Verse 27.).

Traditionally indirect mediated knowledge (Paroksha Jnanam) of the Self is derived from a study of Prasthana Trayam (the triple Vedantic scriptural canons viz., Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita and Brahma Sutras) and allied Prakarana Granthas written by later day Acharyas like Adi Sankara. This does not mean that everyone must necessarily plod through all these and master them before commencing the practice of Self abidance.  If you understand Bhagavan's teachings clearly (in line with scriptural reasoning) with full faith in His words, even one book will be enough viz.,Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi for actual practice!  This is akin to the traditional saying that the Mandukya Upanishad (the shortest Upanishad containing only 12 mantras) alone is enough to achieve liberation. (Muktikopanishad, 'Mandukyam eva alam mumukshunaam vimuktaye'.)

Among the principal works of Bhagavan, Upadesa Saram, Ulladu Narpadu, Guru Vachaka Kovai were hailed as the Ramana Prasthaana Tryam by His direct disciples like Muruganar and Sadhu Om. Each of these texts and other works like Naan Yaar?
and Self Inquiry are complete in themselves and bestow invaluable insights on every other work of Bhagavan, just as the phenomenon of holography is described by the remarkable observation that 'Each is in All and All is in Each.'

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.