Author Topic: Siddha Siddhi - John Grimes:  (Read 646 times)

Subramanian.R

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Siddha Siddhi - John Grimes:
« on: March 02, 2017, 10:59:30 AM »
The word 'siddha' means complete, perfect, accomplished from the root 'sidh' 'to attain'. There are two uses for this word.  One use refers to an accomplished one, a seer, a sage, a perfect being, a Jnani, a Mukta. The other use refers to a person who possesses one or more miraculous powers (siddhi).  Bhagavan Ramana used the word in both of these ways. Further, in this regard He said:

'There are two kinds of siddhis and one kind may well be a stumbling block to Self Realization. It is said that by Mantras, by some drug possessing occult virtues, by severe austerities, or by samadhi of a certain kind, powers can be acquired. But these powers are not a means to Self Knowledge..... the other kind are manifestations of power and knowledge which are quite natural to a person when the Self is realized.
They come of their own accord, they are God given.'  (Sad Darsana Bhashya, Kapali
Sastri).

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.,             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Siddha Siddhi - John Grimes:
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2017, 10:43:39 AM »
Sri Ramana sometimes would say that whether a Siddha possesses Siddhis or not is due
to his destiny.  However, whether they come or not, the Jnani, the Siddha, is not disturbed by them.  Bhagavan said that the Siddha who is firmly settled in the Self,
in Sahaja Samadhi, knows that such a one is the Self and that is the unshakable Siddhi. It has often been noted that Sri Ramana, like Sri Ramakrishna and others before him, had no use for miraculous powers.  A true seeker should pursue the Self and not supernatural powers. 

'Telepathy or radio enables one to see and hear from afar.  They are all the same, hearing and seeing.  Whether one hears from the near or far does not make any difference in hearing. The fundamental factor is the hearer, the subject.  Without the hearer or the seer, there can be no hearing or seeing.  The latter are the functions of the mind.  The occult powers (Siddhis) are therefore only in the mind.  They are not natural to the Self.  That which is not natural, but acquired, cannot be permanent, and is not worth striving for. (Talks. Talks 20).

'Occult powers will not bring happiness to anyone, but will make him all the more miserable!"

Moreover what are these powers for?  The would-be occultist (Siddha) desires to display the Siddhis so that others may appreciate him.  He seeks appreciation, and if it is not forthcoming he will not be happy.  There must be others to appreciate him. He may even find another possessor of higher powers.  That will cause jealousy and breed unhappiness.  The higher occultist (Siddha) may meet a still higher Siddha and so on until there will come one who will blow up everything in a trice.  Such is the highest adept (Siddha) and He is God or the Self. 

Which is the real power?  It is to increase prosperity or bring about peace?  That which
results in peace is the highest perfection (Siddhi). (Talks.)

This is obviously true from one perspective.  However, there is another perspective to consider.  Bhagavan sated in the Sri Ramana Gita, compiled by Ganapati Muni, 'The glory of the Siddhas is beyond imagination.  They are equal to Siva. Indeed they are the very forms of Siva.  They have the power to grant every prayer.'   (Sri Ramana Gita, Chapter XVIII, verse 26.)

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Siddha Siddhi - John Grimes:
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2017, 11:00:35 AM »
When Sri Ramana was asked in a court suit with the Government above the ownership of the Hill (Arunachala), Bhagavan replied, 'Siva always remains in three forms: (1) as Parabrahman Rupa; (2) as Linga Rupa; (3) as Siddha Rupa.' (Talks 492).

In the Sri Arunachala Mahatmya, Siva says, 'Though in fact fiery, my lack-luster appearance as a Hill on this spot is an act of grace for the maintenance of the world. I also abide here as the Siddha.' (Collected Works of Ramana Maharshi). 

Bhagavan made this clear by stating when a devotee raised a doubt about the difference between a Siddha and a Jnani. He replied:

'The Gita questions were asked in a certain spirit.  The answers were according to it. People look to the body only and they want Siddhis also.  With Self Realization no powers can extend even into it, how can they extend beyond?  People anxious for Siddhis are not content with their idea of Jnana and so want Siddhis associated with it. They are likely to neglect the supreme happiness of Jnana and aspire for Siddhis. For this they are going through the by lanes instead of the royal path and so will likely lose their way.  In order to guide them aright and keep them on the royal road alone the Siddhis are said to accompany Jnana.  In fact Jnana comprises all, and a Jnani will not waste even a thought on them.  Let the people get Jnana and then seek Siddhis if they so desire.

I have said: sarira samsrayah siddhayah (the siddhis relate to the body), because their outlook is concerning the body.  A Jnani and Siddha are not different.  In varan
datum (to bestow boons) the boons include Atmalabha (the gain of the Self) also.  The siddhis are not merely of an inferior order but of the highest order.' 

(Talks No. 57).         

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Siddha Siddhi - John Grimes:
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2017, 01:59:10 PM »
In the Halasya Mahima Siva says, 'Though there are eight great Siddhis, a bhakta never wasters a thought on them.'  Siva then says that he never grants boons.  If only the Self is Real, who is there to display what to whom?  In order to display Siddhis there must be others to recognize them.  Therefore, Siddhis are not worthy of even a thought; only Jnana, the Self is to be sought and gained.

The term Siddha also refers to a Mukta, a Sage, defined by Sri Ramana as one naturally, eternally abiding in Sahaja Samadhi. 

He said, 'The body is impermanent (not real). Whether it is at rest or moves about and whether by reason of Prarabdha it clings to him or falls off from him, the Self realized Siddha is not aware of it, even as a drunken man blinded by intoxication is unaware whether his cloth is on his body or not. (Day by Day with Bhagavan, 21.01.1946).

There are Siddhas and Siddhas.  Bhagavan many times spoke of the Siddhas who dwell, He said, in caves of Arunachala. Some must have been individuals who possessed Siddhis and employed them and others may or may not have possessed Siddhis.  He said, 'To this day Siddhas (with supernatural powers) dwell in the caves,
whether with physical bodies or not, and some are said to have seen them as lights
moving about the Hill at night. (At the Feet of Bhagavan, T.K. Sundaresa Iyer.)

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                   

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Re: Siddha Siddhi - John Grimes:
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2017, 11:29:01 AM »
There are a number of incidents where Bhagavan Ramana spoke of Siddhas coming to have His darshan in the form of animals.  He said about a golden hued mongoose, "It must be a Siddha Purusha who has come in this form."  (Friends of Animals - 2013).

He was asked: 'Is it true that Siddha Purushas come in various forms?', Bhagavan replied, 'Yes, it is true.' Another devotee asked, 'Arunagiri Yogi came in the form of a
mangoose.  Is it true?' Bhagavan replied, 'Yes, it is also true.'  (Letters from Sri Ramanasramam, 1.1.1946, Ch. 18, Leopards and Snakes.)

Can a siddha, a jnani, a perfect one perform siddhis? It is obvious that miraculous events do happen around a Jnani and on occasions happened around Sri Ramana.  The Maharshi said that a Jnani has no mind.  He does not make choices, does not act.
For such a one, who is to do what to whom?  Naught really exists but the Self.

Years ago, I met a Swami Sundaram who lived right across the tank from the Kapaleeswara Temple, Mylapore, he was known all over South India as Guruji and had a small ashram on the outskirts of Chennai.  He sweetly said,

'Siddhis are like the money you earn at your chosen profession.  You work, you earn,
you put the money in the wallet that is kept in your pocket.  When you need the money, you take it out and use it.   Then you put your wallet back in your pocket. There are people who earn miraculous powers through austerity (tapas); others by practicing samyama (the practice of dharana / concentration, dhyana / meditation,
and samadhi / absorption in one object); others by consuming certain drugs or herbs;
still others by mantra repetition; others by pranayama or breath control; and some come to possess them spontaneously. 

'A guru is like a postbox.  People come and and deposit letters in the postbox.  The
swamiji then acts like a postman and delivers the letters to their proper destination.
It is the divine that is truly the ultimate dispenser of all miracles, never the messenger.'

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                     

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Re: Siddha Siddhi - John Grimes:
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2017, 11:39:14 AM »
All of a Jnani's actions are performed through the power of the Self.  Ordinary people
observe that a Jnani appears to be acting.  They cannot imagine how any action, including miraculous actions, can be done without choice, decisions, without a mind.

There were actually quite a few accounts of miraculous happenings during Bhagavan's life time. A significant number of devotees related incidents that happened around Him of miraculous nature.  He would reply, if at all, by remarking that all such events were not performed by Him, that they were involuntary and spontaneous.  He never took credit for any of them and revealed no interest in siddhis.  He would often remark that they are of no value.  Once, He said, being told about one such incident, 'I suppose that is what Siddhas do. (Osborne, Arthur, Ramana Maharshi and the Path of Self Knowledge, 2006.  See also Godman, David, The Power of the Presence, Volume 1.
In the chapter on Ranga Rao, Bhagavan said, 'Jnanis are of two types - siddhas and suddhas. Siddhas know that they have extraordinary powers. Suddhas also have such powers but they do not even know that they possess them.')

concluded.

Arunachala Siva,