Author Topic: Krishnamurti: Prayer  (Read 644 times)

Sadhak

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Krishnamurti: Prayer
« on: June 13, 2016, 11:21:58 AM »
Part I.

Like all deep human problems, prayer is a complex affair and needs careful and tolerant probing and patience, not to be rushed at demanding definite conclusions and decisions. Without understanding himself, he who prays might through his very prayer be led to self-delusion. If one indulges in petitionary prayer, it brings its own reward, the thing asked for is often granted, and this only strengthens the prayers of supplication. Then there is prayer not for things or for people, but to comprehend, to experience reality, God, which prayer also is often answered. There are other forms of petitionary prayer more subtle, more devious, but nevertheless demanding and supplicating, begging and offering, openly or roundabout. All such prayers have their own reward, they bring their own experiences, but do such methods bring the realization of the ultimate reality? Let us inquire into this kind of prayer.

continued...

Sadhak

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Re: Krishnamurti: Prayer
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2016, 11:41:03 AM »
Part II.

When we pray to comprehend, to experience reality, God, do we not call upon the accumulated tradition of centuries, which does bring its own experience, but is that the real? Does this supplication to another, to something outside, bring about the understanding of truth? Is this not a 'wrong' approach? Through wrong means you do have results, experiences, but are they of the real?
 
We must understand, from the very beginning, this dual process that is operating in us: the one who prays and that to which the prayer is made. To understand this dualism we must comprehend ourselves, our mind-feeling. Without understanding this, without self-knowledge, prayer with its results  may become a hindrance, leading to delusion. Why create illusion from which it is extremely difficult to extricate oneself?  Is it not wiser to understand the thinker and his thoughts-feelings than to cultivate this dualism which leads to conflict, confusion, sorrow?

continued...

Sadhak

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Re: Krishnamurti: Prayer
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2016, 12:05:25 PM »
Part III.

To understand, then, there must be self-awareness, for out of self-awareness there is self-knowledge. There is no self-knowledge without meditation, and meditation is not possible without self-knowledge. Self-knowledge comes through alert watchfulness of all our thoughts-feelings; this awareness is dulled if there is identification. Realizing that we do identify and so prevent understanding, we must perceive the necessity of kindly, tolerant detachment, suspending judgement. We must observe the conflicts of our thoughts-feelings, their contradictions, their appetites, their hidden pursuits.

Meditation is to free thought-feeling so that it can discover, for that which is discovered, being truth, is liberating and creative. When there is the cessation of becoming, of craving in its many forms, there is the falling away of dualism - the 'me' and the 'not me', he who prays and that which is prayed to. And then we shall experience true being. Our happiness lies in its discovery and not in the delusions of craving, however noble.