Author Topic: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi  (Read 18444 times)

Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2016, 07:21:54 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Ratnammal

After the teenage Ramana came from Madurai to Tiruvannamalai, Bhagavan was in a state of unbroken natural Samadhi. While he was absorbed thus in Pathala linga, a dark, dank, underground niche deep inside the Tiruvannamalai temple, his body was feasted on by insects and vermin while he himself remained without food or care. Gracefully, the Divine Mother sent Ratnammal, a young dancer who was looked down upon by society. One day, Ratnammal saw some urchins throwing stones into the cave. She went inside and saw a dim figure sitting with a faint halo surrounding it. Feeling concerned as to how this ascetic could sustain himself, she brought food and fresh clothes, and left them at the entrance of the cave. Bhagavan, though, was lost in Samadhi, and her offerings remained untouched.

Later, Seshadri Swami discovered Bhagavan, and his body was taken out. Seshadri Swami instructed the temple priest to give milk to Bhagavan. This priest brought milk, not from the Arunachaleshwara shrine, but from Mother Apitakuchalambal's shrine in the Tiruvannamalai temple. This milk poured on Mother's idol, with turmeric, soap nut powder, and ghee was the first Prasad Mother gave him. Bhagavan was not even outwardly conscious; he was in deep Samadhi, so the priest opened his mouth and poured ―Mother's milk, the first food that sustains. When Bhagavan resumed bodily consciousness, he stayed under an illupai tree in the premises, rarely coming into outward consciousness.

Once, when Ratnammal was about to get ready for a dance performance, she noticed Bhagavan seated there. Turning to her mother she said, ―I will not eat until we have served this ascetic some food. They tried to arouse Bhagavan, but in vain. So they opened his mouth and put food in. Sometimes he would swallow it. At other times, the food would remain unswallowed, and they would clean it up the next day. Bhagavan later on said, ―This is the Universal Mother represented by Ratnammal. Bhagavan once told Nagamma, ―Ratnammal was pure.

To my knowledge, Bhagavan has never used such a description for anyone but Ratnammal. He explained that this was not a moral or physical purity he referred to, but to the fact that even in those days, she had the capacity to recognize the divine before her. The Universal Mother was sustaining him. When Bhagavan was to be moved from the temple to Gurumurtam, he pleaded with Ratnammal, ―You need not come there, it is too far. She agreed and obeyed.

Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2016, 12:46:24 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Desurammal - I

When Bhagavan was at Virupaksha cave, a lady named Akhilandammal came from a village called Desur. Bhagavan and the others began to call her Desurammal, as Akhilandammal was too long a name.

Desurammal had seen Bhagavan in 1896, when Bhagavan was in a state of samadhi, and the priest had poured milk into his mouth. Desurammal had witnessed it, but since Bhagavan did not open his eyes and bless her, she went away to the village.

After seven years, she came back to Tiruvannamalai. She was a very devout person who served food to the sadhus; she had fed Seshadri Swami and another Swami, Vittoba Polur. It was 1903 when she returned. She was plucking flowers at the foot of Arunachala. A crowd of people were going toward the banyan tree cave, which is below Virupaksha cave. She asked, ―Where are you all going? Someone replied, ―Oh, there is an ascetic boy who does not talk, doesn't even move, but such peace, such grace.

Desurammal went toward the cave, and saw Bhagavan seated there. This is what she had to say about Bhagavan: ―Even though he was unwashed and covered with dust, his body had a golden glow! On seeing this ascetic with his body frame so lean that it exposed his bones, my Heart melted, and tears welled up within me. The young Lord then opened his eyes and graciously directed them toward me.

Instantaneously, I surrendered myself totally, and took a vow to serve food to the jnani all my life. Bhagavan moved to Virupaksha cave, and she served food to him there. Bhagavan rarely would eat alone. She brought food for the others as well, including Palani Swami and Perumal Swami. Earlier they would beg for food. After this Mother, Desurammal came; there was no dearth of food at lunch for Bhagavan. She was so captivated by Bhagavan's presence that she came with food every day without fail.

Later the other two ladies, Echammal and Mudaliar Paati, started feeding Bhagavan as well. Feeling redundant, Desurammal went back to her village and started a Ramana centre in 1914. It was called Ramanananda Madalayam. Her devotion was so deep that she was always there, observing Bhagavan's teachings, and giving experiential expositions about them. Whenever any of the devotees of Bhagavan at Virupaksha cave fell sick, she would take them to Desur, and give them medical aid as well as all other care. When they were fully cured, she would escort them back to the Virupaksha cave.

Sadhak

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2016, 08:34:33 PM »
The extent of Akhilandammal's devotion can be felt if one visits her home in Desur.  Arunachala is visible from there. The kitchen where she cooked meals for Bhagawan and other devotees is almost primitive.  It takes over an hour by car to reach Desur from the Ashram even today. So it must have easily taken a couple of hours by bullock cart in those days.  She must have started her cooking by dawn and set out for the Ashram by 8 in the morning. Considering the return journey in the afternoon and preparation for meals the next day, it would not be possible to carry on for years like this without total devotion and the corresponding grace from Bhagawan.

Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #18 on: August 25, 2016, 06:30:48 AM »
Desurammal - II

Kunju Swami told me that whenever Desurammal came to Arunachala, in addition to whoever had been feeding Bhagavan, she would also feed them. Bhagavan was very pleased with her. Her two observations about Bhagavan were that firstly, Bhagavan was the only known saint she had fed who shared his food equally with others. The second thing that she noticed was that when there was enough food, it was shared equally not only with the men, but also with the dogs, monkeys, and birds. She narrated a humorous incident about the monkey, Nondi. It was always given the seat next to Bhagavan. While she was serving the Master one day, Nondi snarled at her, and Bhagavan said, ―"Hey! She is one of us. She belongs to our clan, keep quiet!" The monkey then accepted her as one amongst them.

Kunju Swami impressed on me that for whoever was feeding him, Bhagavan did not merely express gratitude. Bhagavan shared with them the purest teaching, the teaching he knew?the one that would release them completely from bondage. One full-moon day, when Desurammal came to Skandashram, there was a sadhu who told Desurammal, ―Today is a very sacred day, a full-moon day. Bhagavan will be getting shaved. When a jnani, a realized person, shaves his head on a full-moon day, he gets enormous power. Hence, today, you should ask for initiation from Bhagavan.

Bhagavan rarely gave initiation, but induced by this sage, she prostrated before him. He asked her, ―"What do you want, Desurammal?" ―"Bhagavan today is a sacred day, and you are the greatest sage." Then she repeated whatever the sadhu had said. ―"You have to initiate me with some mantra."

"Oh! You want a mantra," he replied. Then Bhagavan became serious, sat down, and said in Tamil, ―"Unnai vidadha iru" which means, ―remain without leaving the Self. Desurammal said that he did not just say that and leave. He looked at her and transfixed her with a silent grace. Riveting his look on her for nearly an hour, he also shared with her the inner knowledge of how to remain without giving up the experience of the Self.

When Bhagavan came down the hill to Ramanashram, she would bring food every day. One day Bhagavan told her, ―"Desurammal, there is enough food here." Beseechingly she said, ―"Bhagavan, I want to feed you."

He replied, ―"Bring some of these ingredients and leave them in the kitchen. They will cook, and we will all share it." Desurammal immediately obeyed, and whenever she came, she would bring some rice or dhal and leave it in the kitchen. During the last days of Bhagavan, when Bhagavan was to drop the body, Desurammal was already more than ninety years old, and very weak in health. She wanted to have Darshan; this Mother wanted to have a last look, so she went to him. Nobody recognized Desurammal because the whole management had changed. Bhagavan was in the small building, what we now call Nirvana Room. She was prevented from entering the Nirvana Room. Fortunately, Kunju Swami recognized her and told Bhagavan, who exclaimed, ―"Desurammal! Bring her here, bring her inside." When she went in, she wept seeing Bhagavan?s physical condition and Bhagavan said, ―"Why do you feel sorry for this mortal body? I am always your shelter."

These words of wisdom were not only for Desurammal. For whoever turns to Bhagavan as the image of father and mother, the assurance is that he is the mirror, the mirror that reflects, affirms, and utters the irrefutable silent word of eternity, one?s Self.

binoyc

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2016, 08:25:39 AM »
What an incredibly pious life these devotees must have have lived during their previous births.They were able to see the glorious form of the Lord, able to hear his melodious voice, able to inhale the divine air that he exhaled, able to walk on the sacred dust that he walked on. Can we fathom what these devotees must have experienced with Lord of the universe sitting in front of them. Many have described in much detail the experiences but words can only go so far.

Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2016, 10:00:43 PM »
Well said binoyc! But it is also His Grace that draws us towards Him, and He is ever present as the Self.

Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2016, 10:03:50 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Echammal - I

There was a lady whose children and husband lived far away from Tiruvannamalai. One night she had a dream in which a young ascetic, a young boy with a loincloth and clean-shaven head, said something which she could not understand. After the dream, within a few days, she lost her husband, her son, and one of her two daughters. A few days later, the same boy appeared again in her dream and recited a Sanskrit mantra, which she could not follow. When she went for interpretations to those who supposedly knew, all they would say is, ―God is blessing you.

When all was lost, she wanted to go back to the village of her childhood with her only daughter. When she was leaving, the third dream came. In the third dream, this same boy said, ―Please return to the hill and disappear. You have lived your lives. Your three lives are over.

For Echammal, even before she came to him, Bhagavan had already cleared her apparent three births through the dreams. After she went to her village, her second daughter also died at the age of ten or eleven. She could no longer bear the burden of her sorrow. Some of her relatives advised her to go on a pilgrimage, a Yatri. Searching for solace, she left for north India on a pilgrimage. There she met sadhus, served them, and shared food with them. One of the sadhus initiated her into ashtanga yoga. He shared with her a mantra and told her to concentrate on the tip of her nose. However, none of this worked. She still felt burdened with sorrow.

When she returned to the native village, a relative said, ―At Arunachala, there is a young ascetic. He may not speak, but by serving him and being in his proximity, you will attain the grace. The very next day, she went to Tiruvannamalai. It was 1906, and Bhagavan was in Virupaksha cave. She went to have his Darshan, and Bhagavan looked at her for one hour. She stood with tears rolling down from her eyes in front of Bhagavan, who had tears streaming down his own face as well. Not a single word transpired between them, but after this one hour, she felt some immense power, some mysterious force, that seemed to keep her immobilized. Miraculously, there was not a drop of sorrow left in her. She felt the grace, and took a vow that she would feed this ascetic all her life.
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Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2016, 10:43:56 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Echammal - II

Every day, without fail, she served Bhagavan, but she still had a little worldly attachment. She wanted to bring up a girl, so with Bhagavan's permission, she adopted a girl named Chellammal. Echammal would often send Chellammal to deliver food to Bhagavan. One day, when taking food to Bhagavan, Chellammal found a piece of printed paper with something written in Sanskrit. She took it to Bhagavan. When it was time to eat, she refused her meal saying, ―No, no! Today is Ekadashi. I will not eat. Today is a vrata. It is a vow for Hindus, and my mother said none of us should eat. Bhagavan, without reacting, casually asked her, ―What do you have in your hand? She gave him the paper, which had a sloka in Sanskrit, from Srimad Bhagavatam. Translated, it meant: ―When one has learned to love the company of sages?satsang?why follow all these rules of discipline? When a cool southern breeze is blowing, what need is there for a fan? When you are in satsang, no ritualistic injunctions need to be followed. Thus explaining, he coaxed Chellammal to eat.

As time went by, Chellammal got married and had a son she named Ramana. When the child was born, Echammal sought the Master's blessings and laid him on Bhagavan's lap. Unfortunately, sometime later, Chellammal passed away. Echammal, though deeply affected, had steadied herself by the association of this sage. One day Bhagavan told her, ―Just meditate. She was following the meditation of ashtanga yoga and told Bhagavan, ―When I meditate, I see lights. Bhagavan, in response, shared with her these instructions: ―The objective lights that you see are not your real goal. You should aim at realizing your Self and nothing short of it.

From that day onward, Echammal started taking to Self-Enquiry and meditating under Bhagavan's guidance. Nevertheless, her vasanas were difficult to renounce. One day, she took a vow to pluck one hundred thousand leaves from a vilva tree and offer them to Bhagavan's picture. She was able to pluck only fifty thousand leaves, so she complained to Bhagavan, ―I wanted to complete this ritual, but I could only manage to find fifty thousand leaves. ―Did you try all the trees? asked Bhagavan. ―Yes Bhagavan. I tried all the trees but I could pluck only fifty thousand. Bhagavan's face changed, ―Then why don't you pluck flesh from your body and offer that instead? Echammal thought Bhagavan was joking. She said, ―How can I pinch my own body? It will hurt. Bhagavan then turned to her; ―You are plucking leaves from the tree. Will it not hurt the tree? ―How could I know that? she replied.

Bhagavan retorted, ―When you knew pinching your own body is painful, why did you not recognize that the tree will be equally pained if you rob it of its leaves? Do I have to tell you that? This transformed her completely.

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Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #23 on: August 27, 2016, 02:05:31 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Echammal - III

Another time when Echammal brought food for Bhagavan, the Ashram management informed her that they did not require her services any more. Feeling deeply disappointed, she said, ―Bhagavan, I have grown grey. I have given everything of mine to serve you. Is this the reward I get? Like Arunachala, have you, too, turned to stone? What can I do but go back? Saying this, she went back to her home in Tiruvannamalai town. Back at the Ashram, they rang the bell signaling lunch time. Bhagavan was on the sofa as usual. Relaxed, all waited for five minutes, ten minutes, fifteen minutes, but he did not get up to go and eat. Bhagavan was smiling, and one of the intelligent attendants understood. He enquired at the office, and they rushed to Echammal, begging her to forgive them. When she refused to come with them, they pleaded that without her, Bhagavan would not eat. Hearing this convinced her to run back to Bhagavan immediately.
Another day, Echammal was unable to go herself, and sent food for Bhagavan through someone else. It was kept in the kitchen, and they forgot to serve it to Bhagavan. In the dining hall, it was the custom to serve everyone first and Bhagavan last. Then Bhagavan would nod his head, and the others would begin eating. As usual, everyone was served, including Bhagavan. Bhagavan was seated quietly. He did not give the customary nod, so again this intelligent attendant enquired, ―Have you served Echammal?s food? They said, ―No, we forgot! Once Echammal's food was served, he began his meal.

Toward the end of her life, Echammal was unconscious for two days. The first day, when she was struggling to breathe, Bhagavan sat for five hours like a rock on the sofa, deep in samadhi. Many remarked that they had very rarely seen Bhagavan sit like that. Later on, they came to know that that was the time when Echammal was struggling. According to the doctors, she went into coma after that. No doubt she was already absorbed, and Bhagavan had received her into that state.

The next day when she was to relinquish the body, the ladies wanted to test Echammal. In a loud voice, one of them said, ―It appears that food has not reached Bhagavan. Suddenly Echammal opened her eyes wide. She could not speak, but with the expression of her eyes asked, ―What happened? They replied, ―No, no! We were joking. The food has already gone to Bhagavan. Hearing this, with a peaceful smile, she closed her eyes and the body was dropped. When Bhagavan was informed, he made this beautiful comment, ―Echammal has shuffled her old load, but my load is still remaining.
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Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #24 on: August 28, 2016, 05:51:37 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Mudaliar Paati - I

There was another beautiful lady named Mudaliar Paati (Paati means grandmother). She lived in a village with her son and daughter-in-law. She had been serving a sadhu, and he was about to die. She asked him what they should do now, and he said, ―Go to Arunachala, there is a saint there. Serve him. Your function, your life's purpose, will be granted.

Mudaliar Paati was very old when she came to Bhagavan. She saw Bhagavan at the Virupaksha cave in 1910. The very first glimpse of Bhagavan revealed to her an exhilarating spiritual experience. On the spot, she took a vow, ―I will offer food to Bhagavan until my last day.
Whenever she was able to, she would get money or provisions from the village. She gradually sold all her property to enable herself to serve Bhagavan. When she had nothing left, she bought sesame seeds from the market, crushed them into oil, and sold it in the market. With whatever little profit she made, she bought provisions to make food for Bhagavan and fed him.

This is why Bhagavan once said, ―I'm afraid of two people?Ramanatha Brahmachari and Mudaliar Paati. What is that fear? It is not really fear; Bhagavan was a slave to selfless service, total surrender, and unlimited devotion. According to Bhagavan, these two people came under that category.

There are so many instances in Mudaliar Paati's life that display her deep devotion. Even after coming to Ramanashram, she insisted on feeding Bhagavan with her own hand. She had become half blind due to old age. One day, when serving Bhagavan's food she stepped on the leaf on which his food was served. An attendant standing next to him scolded her, ―Hey! You do not have eyesight, why do you come? When you cannot see Bhagavan, why do you come and disturb everyone? Mudaliar Paati replied, ―How does it matter if I can't see him? Bhagavan sees me; his grace is on me, that is enough.

Another time, when she heard that Bhagavan's health was deteriorating after the first operation, she wanted to see him. She had gone blind, but still insisted on being with Bhagavan. She was brought to the hall, and strained her eyes to see. Bhagavan consoled her, ―Paati, I'm all right, my body is all right. She was not fully satisfied. She stepped outside and stood at the gate. When Bhagavan came out, she said, ―Hey, stop! Then with her hands, from head to foot, she touched him. Then he asked, ―Are you satisfied now?

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Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2016, 04:38:17 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Mudaliar Paati - II

This remarkable lady stayed in Ramananagar in her last days, when she was to pass away. It was 1949. Kunju Swami, Viswanatha Swami, and Suri Nagamma were sent by Bhagavan to check on Paati's health. They put up a hut in front of Ramananagar, a little bit away from Ramanashram. Bhagavan enquired about her daily until her death.

Even in that condition she continued cooking. The blind lady had lost her daughter-in-law, lost everyone, but until her last day she cooked for Bhagavan. The day she was to die, she cooked and then made sure that the meal was taken to Bhagavan. She insisted on being informed when Bhagavan had finished eating this food. When that was reported to her, she blissfully closed her eyes and dropped the body. Bhagavan shared with instructions to the others that she should be buried like a realized sadhu, as he had given in the case of Seshadri swami and his own mother. Earlier, the day when Echammal passed away, he made this remark, ―Still, Mudaliar Paatti is alive. When Mudaliar Paatti passed away, Bhagavan declared, ―A big responsibility has been taken off my shoulders.

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Sadhak

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2016, 08:22:04 AM »
The burial stone of Mudaliar Patti (opposite the Dhakshinamurthy temple) used to be a popular landmark for devotees until about 10 years back.  But it was removed by the government authorities in the name of development. It is one of the great tragedies.  Apparently nobody knew what was happening until it was too late. May the Lord have mercy on those souls.

Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #27 on: August 30, 2016, 05:17:28 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni - I

It is late nineteenth century, ancient Benares, India. A fourteen-year-old boy sits amidst a group of scholars: mathematicians, poets, a music maestro, and an astrologer, among others. The mathematicians give him a six-digit number multiplied by another six-digit number. One poet recites the last two lines of a Sanskrit verse and challenges the boy to compose the first two lines in the same meter and completes it. The other poet, meanwhile, gives him a subject to immediately compose a four-line Sanskrit verse. The astrologer places before him a complex pattern of planetary positions and asks him what the consequence will be. The musician hums a few notes of a particularly obscure raga and asks the boy to identify it. Another man rattles off a random date, like February 18, 1756, and asks what day that was. As if all this weren't enough, another man stands behind the boy and throws tiny pebbles on his back while the others throw their challenges. The boy is expected to simultaneously keep count of how many pebbles were thrown. The boy answers all of them, instantaneously, correctly . . . brilliantly, to the tumultuous applause of an admiring audience. The boy is none other than Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni, soon to become one of the foremost devotees of Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi. This boy-wonder, Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni, soon gained acclaim all over India. (―Muni means one who is steeped in psychic powers.) Before he was born, his parents, a pious couple, had no children. His father went to Benares and prayed at the Ganesa temple there. He had a vision that the idol of Lord Ganesa came to life and merged with him. At the very same time back in his village, his wife who was in the local Devi temple saw the idol turning to light and the light appeared to enter her. Soon afterward, a son was born to the couple, and they named him Ganapati, in gratitude to Lord Ganesa.

However, to their utter disappointment, the boy could not talk at all. Until the age of five, he remained mute and expressionless. Moreover, he was plagued with every possible disease, including epilepsy. In desperation, in order to cure him, they resorted to the age old practice of branding him with a red-hot, iron rod. This treatment however, had far-reaching effects. The shock unleashed the boy?s latent talents, and he became exceptionally brilliant.

His retention power, his concentration, his capacity to repeat, and to remember knowledge increased manifold. By the age of nine, he had Mastered Sanskrit literature, and by the age of eleven, he had memorized all the four Vedas and Upanishads. When he was fourteen years old, Ganapati had composed a drama in Sanskrit, which even today is acclaimed as one of the best Sanskrit dramas ever. The ancient scriptures mention that the rishis of yore did penance, and God appeared before them and granted them boons. Strongly influenced by these texts, Kavyakantha sought to achieve the same. He got married when he was eighteen years old, but his fervor to have God's Darshan became more intense. He embarked on a long pilgrimage, visiting temples as well as all the sacred rivers like the Ganges, the Yamuna, and the Godavari, doing penance or tapas wherever he went. His penance was rigorous: he remained silent and motionless for long periods and went without food.

Though he meticulously obeyed all the rules of traditional penance, God was not apparent before him. According to Hindu tradition, if one does not find God through one method of penance, there are alternate methods. With every method failing, Kavyakantha finally took the last resort: doing penance in the five holy places of Shiva. These five holy places dedicated to Shiva represent the five elements: Earth, Water, Fire, Air, and Ether. One must visit each place in a particular order and arrive finally in the place dedicated to Fire, i.e. Arunachala. A devotee's tapas or penance is said to be rewarded here, and he is finally united with God (or Shiva). Kavyakantha followed the necessary rituals and reached Arunachala in 1904.

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Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #28 on: August 31, 2016, 05:24:09 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni - II

During the course of his penance in Arunachaleshwara temple, he went up the hill and saw Bhagavan sitting with eyes closed, absorbed in Samadhi. Consequently, Kavyakantha did not receive the glance of grace and went away, disappointed. While still pursuing his practice, he took up a job in the city. In 1907, he became dejected and felt that his life was futile. He decided to give his search for God one last try. ―I am going to Arunachala again, which, the scriptures declare is the final destination for one's search for God. If I do not have God's Darshan this time, I am going to proclaim that the Vedas, Upanishads, and all the Hindu scriptures are just exaggerations of poetic minds. With this resolve and remedies exhausted, he returned to Arunachala.

Around Arunachala, there is a Shiva shrine located on each of the eight directions. Determined to perform his penance to the best of his capacity, he went south west to the Nirudhilingam shrine. It was surrounded by forests at that time. He took shelter in the hollow of a large, dead tree and resumed his severe penance of being silent and going without food. After the fifth or sixth day, the Divine Mother spoke to him: ―Until you have a guru, you cannot achieve your goals. Your guru is up there on the hill. Surrender at his holy feet, and you will get his grace. Go now!

Kavyakantha leapt out of the hollow. It was one o'clock in the afternoon, and the sun was beating down hard. The Karthikai festival was on, and thousands of people thronged around the hill. Undeterred, he ran up the hill to Virupaksha cave and most extraordinarily, there was no one else there. Bhagavan, seated alone outside the cave, directed his glance of grace at Kavyakantha. Like many devotees before him, he was transfixed, eyes locked on one another, and he could not take his eyes off Bhagavan. Kavyakantha, an erudite scholar, had never prostrated himself before any human being. But in that moment, he found himself flat on the ground in front of this young ascetic.
He held Bhagavan's feet tightly and cried, ―I have read all that has to be read. I have fully understood Vedanta, I have performed japa to my Heart's content, yet I have not, up to this time, understood what tapas really is! Therefore, I have sought refuge at your feet. Pray, enlighten me as to the nature of tapas. The word ―tapas in Sanskrit literally means ―striving for the realization of Truth through penance and austerity. However, Bhagavan imparted its deeper meaning to Kavyakantha.

Helping him rise to his feet, Bhagavan looked into his eyes and after some time slowly replied, ―If one watches from where the notion 'I' arises, the mind is absorbed into that. That is tapas. And since Kavyakantha had himself revealed that he practiced mantra japa, repeating mantras thousands of times every day, the Master added, ―When repeating a mantra, if one watches the source from which the sound is produced, the mind is absorbed in that. That is tapas.
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Krishnan

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Re: The Human Gospel of Ramana Maharshi
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2016, 10:03:12 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
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Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni - III

These revelations thrilled Kavyakantha. He finally understood how to be in touch with the Truth through a practical method. Wave after wave of ecstasy flooded through him for hours in the presence of the ascetic. At last, when he opened his eyes he asked the attendant, Palani Swami, for the ascetic's name. Though he was then called Brahmana Swami, he learned that his real name was Venkataraman. Kavyakantha took ―Ramana from his name and since he had seen God reflected in this ascetic, he named him ―Bhagavan. Bhagavan in Sanskrit means God. As he had also given a revelation about tapas, which no scripture had ever explained before, according to Kavyakantha, Bhagavan was also a Vedic rishi. (Rishi means ―sage and is derived from ―drashtra, which means ―seer: one who has seen with the ―inner eye and not just with the mortal eyes.) But to Kavyakantha, Bhagavan was not only a rishi, but a Maharshi, or a great rishi. Therefore, the name, Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi came to be.

This name, ―Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi, the chanting of which has lured countless people to the silent still Truth, was given by this gifted Kavyakantha Ganapati Muni. At that time he had over two hundred disciples of his own, including noble scholars like Devarata and Kapali Shastri. He wrote a letter to them saying, ―I have found my guru. Henceforth it is not I, but Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi who is our guru.

The next day he went to Bhagavan and said, ―Bhagavan, please accept me. Bhagavan graciously conceded to his request and said, ―Stay in the cave, which is adjacent to Virupaksha cave. Called Mango Tree cave, its proximity to Virupaksha cave allowed the guru and disciples to visit each other every day. Bhagavan continued to share his grace and help Kavyakantha mature spiritually.

Bhagavan held Kavyakantha in high esteem and addressed him with much respect. One day Kavyakantha held Bhagavan's feet and begged, ―Please do not address me respectfully, Bhagavan! I am your disciple and your child. Do not address me in such reverential terms! Yet Bhagavan continued to do so. He then learned from his other disciples and Kavyakantha's admirers that they referred to him as Nayana. ―Nayana means father in Sanskrit. Therefore Bhagavan told Kavyakantha, ―Hereafter, I will call you Nayana. Nayana accepted this because Nayana in Sanskrit also means disciple or child.

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