Author Topic: Kaivalya -  (Read 756 times)

Subramanian.R

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Kaivalya -
« on: March 05, 2016, 12:40:22 PM »
Kaivalya:

(This article is from Mountain Path,  Aradhana 2005 issue.)

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Kaivalya:

Sanskrit - aloofness; aloneness; isolation.
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In the context of Bhagavan's teachings this means 'solitude' or the state of Self Realization where
nothing exists apart from the Self. According to the scriptures, it means complete detachment from
the material world.

The Yoga Darshana defines it thus:  'When the purity of contemplation equals the purity of the indivdual,
there is isolation'  The Sankhya Darshana sees it as an aloofness from primal Nature (Prakruti) and
all its transformations. There is no pain or pleasure in this state.  The immediate cause for this absolute
detachment is discriminating knowledge (Viveka).

When the Jeeva (the individual soul), merges in its source, Atman (Absolute Unconditioned Awareness,
the Self) in the Heart, and loses itself to become one with It, then That Alone Exists.  This state of
subtle experience is Kaivalya.  (See Preface to Ramana Jnana Bodham, by Muruganar, Volume 2).

In the classical example of a pot existing in Space, the pot-space is defined by the pot shell.  When the
pot is moved, the pot space appears to move. But is this the case?  Space is all pervasive and thus
exists everywhere, in and through the pot shell also.  The pot is a limited form. Therefore it can be
moved away from here to there.  But space is everywhere.  So how can space move and to where?

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Kaivalya -
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2016, 11:06:15 AM »
The physical space is perceived by the mind through the eyes exists in mental space.  'And where does
the concept of space exist?  In our absolute unlimited awareness, our Self or Atman.'  (Atma Vidya Verse 5).
says Bhagavan.  '

The entire cosmos, including space, is pervaded by this Chitakasa, our omnipresent Being and omniscient
Knowing.  Chitakasa is therefore, is called, subtler than the subtlest.' and greater than the greatest'
since nothing exists apart from from it.  (GVK V. 498).     

Furthermore, Bhagavan describes this as 'the infinite expanse of Grace.'  (Eleven Verses, Verse  6).

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Kaivalya -
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2016, 10:02:35 AM »
Bhagavan tries to describe, for our sake, what really cannot be described"  'The Sage established in the Heart
does not know anything as the substratum for the entire universe except the Self.  Like the screen which
supports the manifestation of the images in a film show, the Self allows the appearance of manifestation and
the existence of the entire universe comprising sentient beings and insentient matter in It. (Guru Vachaka
Kovai, Verse  450.)

Therefore, He can declare, 'I am all that exists'.  He can also say that 'I am' is all alone (the state of kaivalya),
since nothing exists apart from from Him.

Bhagavan expresses these ideas in this verse:  'Immaculate Arunachala!  The entire cosmos comprising
the five elements and the manifestations of sentient beings and insentient matter is not apart from You,
the Chitakasa, (absolute unlimited awareness).  Then how can 'I' exist as an individual self apart from you?
When You shine as Chitakasa in the Heart, swallowing up every thing, how can this 'I' emerge as an individual
self?  Make me merge into my source and thus reveal Your real nature (to me).  (Eleven Stanzas, Verse 7).
When the rising wave identifies with its form it forgets the identity with the ocean.  This is regained only
when it dissolves back into the source, the ocean.

Confirmation of this comes from Sri Muruganar speaking of his own experience: 'Omnipresent Being
and omniscient Knowing, all pervasive state of Siva, (where nothing exists apart), is alone Kaivalya.
Praised be Bhagavan who bestowed this state on this undeserving person.  (Ramana Jnana Bodham,
Volume 2, Verse 1026).

concluded.


Arunachala Siva.