Author Topic: A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:  (Read 1117 times)

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43550
    • View Profile
A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:
« on: January 29, 2016, 11:17:29 AM »
(The article appeared in April- June 2007 issue of Mountain Path.)


It was in 1947, that my parents shifted from Mangalore to Madras and I began an engineering course at
Annamalai University. During the three years from 1947 to 1950, I had the opportunity of visiting
Sri Ramanasramam at Tiruvannamalai along with my mother K.K. Kalyani Amma,, who was a devotee
of Bhagavan Ramana Maharshi. My mother's elder brother, K.K. Nambiar,and elder sister K.K. Madhavi
Amma were ardent devotees of Ramana Maharshi from the early 1930s, ever since they chanced to live
in Tiruvannamalai for a few years. They influenced other members of our extended family to come and
pay their respects to Bhagavan.  My family seems to have had a connection to Bhagavan because another
uncle, Dr. P.C. Nambiar, was posted to Tiruvannamalai as the Government Doctor for the District at that
time, and as a part of his routine he looked after the medical needs of Sri Ramanasramam.

I distinctly remember my first visit to the Asramam in the company of my mother in 1947. There was
the arch over the front gate, then as now, which announced that we were entering the Asramam precincts.
I still remember vividly, even after a gap of fifty years, the old iluppai tree which greeted the visitor.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   
« Last Edit: January 29, 2016, 12:51:33 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43550
    • View Profile
Re: A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2016, 10:01:48 AM »
Being young I did not sit for very long in the small hall where Bhagavan gave darshan. After about ten
minutes my cousin and I left to climb the nearby Arunachala.  But the short time I did sit on the cool
floor in Bhagavan's presence made an indelible impression.  There was a sense of quiet. Bhagavan mostly
looked at people in a serene manner.  When he looked at me I felt very happy and pleased.There was a
sense of elation.  I did not feel fear, anxiety or any other type of negativity in his presence.  He was
friendly and approachable.

My visits to Sri Ramanasramam were exhilarating though brief. I would sit with folded hands, along with
my mother in the hall, as near to Bhagavan possible. My mother would tell me about how her worries
disappeared while sitting in the hall in Bhagavan's presence, and quite often she would clear her doubts
by seeking clarifications from him, which were always forthcoming.  In spite of the large number of devotees
present, the calm and peace that pervaded the place had a powerful effect on us.  I would also spend
considerable time walking on the Hill and enjoying the tranquility of the surroundings.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43550
    • View Profile
Re: A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2016, 11:35:23 AM »
Bhagavan had a great sense of humor.   There was once incident which illustrated this, when a nephew
of mine saw the monkeys in the courtyard outside the Hall, and being a mischievous boy, began to chase
them.  Bhagavan, who saw this joked, 'They are all monkeys.'  It may not sound so funny now, but when
He spoke with such affection, one could not but laugh with Him at the comical sight of those scampering
imps. 

Altogether, visiting Sri Ramanasramam was a great experience and affected the course of my future life.
When I remember that time, it is with a feeling of overwhelming peace; more so even than when I
visited holy temples such as Guruvayur.  The peace was something you automatically took with you
when the time came for departure.  It lingered on for days and even now, so many years after these events
of my childhood, there is deep down a prevailing sense of peace which has kept me safe and secure when
times were rough and uncertain.

In 1949, we first heard about Bhagavan's illness that eventually proved fatal.  My mother was shocked
at the possibility that Bhagavan would no longer be physically present in this world.  She had a dream
about Him and saw His body, which gave her some solace.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                 

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43550
    • View Profile
Re: A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2016, 09:55:30 AM »
I did not realize it at the time, but the most important experience I had with Bhagavan  occurred in
April 1950.  My uncle K.K. Nambiar was sitting in his garden at night in Gandhinagar, Chennai,
when he saw a comet streaking by, and immediately recognizing the significance of it, told his
family members that a great person must have passed away.  Within half an hour he received a call
from Sri Ramanasramam informing him that Bhagavan had attained Mahanirvana.  It was well known
that Bhagavan had been suffering for sometime, and all my family were alert to the fact that one day
we would face the aching fact that our beloved Bhagavan was no longer within the simple reach.

My uncle immediately passed on the distressing information to my mother, and we soon left for
Tiruvannamalai by car and reached there by seven a.m.  While the normal Hindu custom is to cremate
the bodies of the dead, great sages and gurus are given the highest honor by burying them in a seated
position.  It was my uncle, K.K. Nambiar who selected the exact location of  the burial, and amidst the
chanting of prayers, the bathed and anointed body of Bhagavan Ramana Maharshi, seated in the lotus
position, was lowered into the grave.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43550
    • View Profile
Re: A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 10:29:36 AM »
Along with many of my close family members I was destined to witness this ceremony at close quarters,
and to this day I have a dramatic memory of the events of that extraordinary day.  In the evening I walked
down the sloped of the Hill once again and knew decisively that life would never be the same.   Bhagavan's
presence had permeated our lives and was the rock upon which we had depended, especially my mother
who was now in profound shock.  We feared for her and understood that even though we all felt the loss,
my mother was particularly vulnerable and upset because she had given her heart and soul to Bhagavan.
We returned to Madras the next day with heavy hearts knowing that life had radically changed and we
could never go back to those carefree days.  A door had closed.  Even now  I feel the emptiness of that moment.

I resumed my studies and eventually found a position within the fledgling steel industry. I believed in the
philosophy of Swami Vivekananda; that it is not so important to pander to ritualistic practices but better
to concentrate one's effort in doing the right thing. 'Your God is in your work and it is more important to do
one's duties correctly than to visit temples'  This quote from Swami Vivekananda struck a note with me and
it has been the guiding principle in my life ever since.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
   

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43550
    • View Profile
Re: A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2016, 10:30:14 AM »
Because of this attitude I worked tirelessly in the steel industry and slept soundly because this feeling
of great satisfaction infused my work.  Because I felt satisfied that I had 'enough' for my needs, there
was never the desire to have more than what life gave me.

Satisfaction meant the successful completion of projects on time and to the desired quality.  The first major
scheme I was involved with was the Bhilai Steel Plant in Madhya Pradesh. The due date for the completion
of the project on the 2nd February 1959, and the President of India, Rajendra Prasad, was to inaugurate
the plant. We worked day and night during the last couple of months.  There was a sense of satisfaction
for India, and it certainly was not the money, which was a pittance.  Both Mahatma Gandhi and Pandit
Nehru inspired the whole country with a pioneering spirit and a sense of sacrifice which are hard to understand today in this commercial world we inhabit.  Nehru was a dynamic man, an idealist who inspired
both us who worked for the Government and the people, with an honesty and sincerity.  It was a unique
inspiration felt by that particular generation of pioneers to bring the country forward.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         
     

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43550
    • View Profile
Re: A Sense of Peace -- K.C. Mohan:
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2016, 10:32:37 AM »
The philosophy of Sri Ramana Maharshi and my parent's teachings influenced my code of values.
As Chairman and Managing Director of MECON (Metallurgical and Engineering Consultants of India Ltd.,)
from 1972 to 1980, I was involved in some of the largest steel projects in the country. By reading and
understanding Bhagavan's teachings I realized there is more to life than accumulation of power and wealth.
Truth and service to the people are the most important factors one must take into consideration in life.

Now I am leading a retired life in Chennai, but part of my time is spent for social and charitable causes
as The Banyan in Chennai, a home for mentally disturbed women, the Cheshire Homes and Eye Care
institutions in Kerala.  Let us keep the adage in mind: "if God has been kind to us, we should be kind
to others.'

concluded.

Arunachala Siva.