Author Topic: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.  (Read 11619 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #60 on: July 12, 2016, 11:49:15 AM »
Verse  143.

For those who merely act the part of the realized sage what enjoyment will there be, other than that of
the daily offerings of food they receive?  Can they know the bliss which is not known even to those whose
consciousness is pure, who have cut away desire, renouncing both inwardly and outwardly?

The text says 'nana kiriyai nadippavar' which means literally 'those who act out the conduct of Jnana.'
Here the word 'kiriyai' is used in the general sense of action, conduct.  TCS glosses it as nanacharam
- the practices related to jnana, the final stage on the Siddhanta spiritual path.

As described in a number of previous verses, bliss is a state which precedes the final state of liberation,
and in which there is a still a trace of discriminating consciousness.  In the final state itself there is no
longer any distinction between the bliss and the knower of it.  In that state, the Jnani is both the
Self, and the bliss of the Self;  he knows it by being it, since there is no other to know it objectively,'
hence it is called 'ariya inbam' - the bliss which is not known.  Sri Ramana has spoken of  bliss in the
following terms:

...ananda (bliss), is also called an obstacle, because in that state a feeling of separation from the source
of ananda, enabling the enjoyer to say, 'I am enjoying ananda' is present.  Even this has to be surmounted.
The final stage of samadhana or samadhi has to be reached in which one becomes Ananda or one with Reality,
and the duality of enjoyer and enjoyment ceases in the ocean of Sat Chit Ananda or the Self.
(Day by day with Bhagavan, 25.4.1946 morning.)

At the end of the verse the Tamizh text says 'avaa arutttu turavu aay' - cutting away desire and practicing
renunciation.  TCS glosses, 'turavu' is the ending of outward attachment.  'avaa aruttal' is the ending
of inner attachment. When both these forms of attachment fall away, the states of Chakalam and
Kevalam fall away. When these fall away, true realization appears.  The verse is an indirect reference to
Tirukkural in which Chapter 36, entitled Mey unarthal -Knowledge of the True is located  between
Chapter 35, Turavu - Renunciation and Chapter 37, Ava Aruttal - The Extirpation of Desire.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #61 on: July 13, 2016, 11:42:45 AM »
Verse 144:

Bliss is indeed the dwelling place of true knowledge. You are like the Achunam bird, in that an atom of
suffering in this world appears as great as a mountain, and through this virtuous quality a longing for
supreme bliss has arisen in you.  Listen now, and seeking supreme bliss in the following manner, you
shall obtain it.

The word 'puL' employed in the verse a bird in general.  Here the Asunam bird is meant.  It is described
by the Tamizh Lexicon as follows, 'A creature believed to be susceptible to harmony that when it is
fascinated by notes of music, a sudden loud beat of the drum causes its instantaneous death.'  Similarly
the mature disciple, in whom the desire for liberation has grown exceedingly strong, will suffer greatly
from the least contact with the things in the world, if he allows himself to become identified with them.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #62 on: July 14, 2016, 10:02:54 AM »
Verse  145:

Supreme  Bliss is not separate from you.  It is your true Being.  That which arises with the sense objects
is bliss also, but it is not the pure consciousness in which bliss itself is annihilated.  In that state both
kinds of bliss are annihilated.

Since our true nature is bliss only, a degree of bliss is experienced through contact with the objects of sense,
but this bliss is not to be mistaken for the bliss which is experienced through transcending the senses
entirely, and which precedes its own annihilation in the state of realization.  The meaning is not entirely
clear.  In this translation it has been taken to mean that the Jnani, having freed himself from the bliss
of the world of the senses, then experiences supreme bliss at the point of merging with the Self.  However,
for this merger to take place, even this supreme bliss,  which still contains a trace of duality, must be lost.
It could also mean that the first kind of bliss is lost because it is only temporary, and when it passes away,'
the experiencer is returned once more to  the sufferings of the phenomenal world, whilst the second kind
of bliss, supreme bliss, is lost because the duality of experiencer and the thing experienced cease on merging
permanently with the Self.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #63 on: July 15, 2016, 12:37:30 PM »
Verse  146:


The inferior bliss that arises with the objects of sense, lasts for some time, then disappears is of little
worth;  the superior bliss is that which is all consuming and endures without intermission.  Can it
be gained by the discriminating mind? The bliss which appears and is subsequently lost is synonymous
with the alternating states of pleasure and pain.  Your true state is that of the bliss which neither
appears nor subsides.


The state referred to in the first part of the verse is that of those who try to experience bliss with
the discriminating mind, it being understood that no such attempt on the part of the Jnani would,
or could, be made.   

The state of being merged in the Self is one of pure bliss, yet it is not perceived as such, since there
is no discriminating intelligence to perceive it.  Being of the very nature of the Self, it neither appears
nor disappears.  This is rather like the state of deep sleep, which we recognize to have been blissful
only on waking up from it. If we imagine therefore a state which is like deep sleep, but filled with
undifferentiated awareness, then we have some idea of the state being alluded to here.

(to be continued when the next issue of Mountain Path is received.)

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #64 on: October 04, 2016, 11:55:10 AM »
The scriptures declare that the all embracing supreme reality is everywhere.  When you say that it is to
be found, not in one holy place, but in this or that other place, are you saying that it does not exist
where you are?  Witless fool, know that supreme bliss will only arise when you reach the firmament
of true knowledge, upon the destruction of your defective, discriminating awareness.  (147).

As long as there is identification with the body, the objects of senses will not subside.  If they do subside
(through control of the mind and senses), unconsciousness will result  (Therefore you should cultivate
the awareness that the world does not exist apart from the Self.)  Is the space of the heavens disturbed
when a bird flies through it?  When one realizes the true nature of the worldly bond, (it will lose its hold
on you), just as the heat of fire is annulled by the power of the Mantra. (148)

Certain Mantras are supposed to possess the power of annulling the heat of fire.  See also Verse 30,
where the same simile is employed in the opposite sense, the power of Mantras being compared to the
veiling power of anava malam. Just as the Mantra supposedly protects us from the heat of fire,
the firm realization that the world does not exist apart from the Self will enable us to remain unaffected
by it.  If we know ourselves as the underlying 'screen'  of the Self, we will not be affected by anything
that appears to occur on it, just as the sky is not affected by the bird that flies across it.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva..           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #65 on: October 04, 2016, 12:20:54 PM »
What does it matter if the body remains or if it goes?  Endless are the workings of those divine beings,'
who dwell with form, without form and both with and without form.  Is it necessary to break up a clay
pot to prove that it is made of earth?  Your course is to abide in that state of pure Maya, fully aware
of your nature as the Self.    (149)


The Self, Sivam, is traditionally conceived in three aspects, that of formlessness, the undifierentiated
supreme reality, that of form, the manifestation of that reality in the form of a living Guru, and that
which is both with and without form, which is the reality manifesting in the form of Siva Lingam.

The general idea seems to be that it is futile for disciples to try to second guess the working out of
their spiritual destiny, regarding the body to be an obstacle to enlighten and so on. 

It is not necessary to crumble a clay pot into dust to prove that it is made of clay.  We are not so confused
by its pot like form that we cease to realize that its basic essence is just common earth.  In the same way,
in order to realize that the body is but an empty form whose only true essence is the Self, we do not need
to attempt to destroy and disaggregate that body.  Indeed, any attempt to do so would be futile.

The words pure Maya in the final sentence are a translation of the Tamizh Maya Vayinathavam,
Sanskrit Maya baindava.  Baindava is derived from the word Bindu, which is synonymous with Sakti
tattva .  It is Sakti which, as Maya, veils consciousness and creates the world experience.  What seems
to be meant here is a state in which, though still embodied, and therefore subject to some extent to
Suddha (Pure) Maya, the aspirant has perceived the world experience to be other than his true self and
is therefore no longer subject to ego illusion, the effect of Anava Malam, the world illusion of Asuddha
(impure) Maya and the consequent cycle of deeds which lead to continued rebirth, Kanma Malam.
Such being the case, it is of no interest to him whatsoever whether or for how long his bodily existence
is prolonged.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                                 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #66 on: October 04, 2016, 12:46:38 PM »
The aim of Vedanta is to be free from the delusion of Maya, (in which the world appears to be real),
like the snake seen in rope, and the thief seen in the wooden post, whilst the aim of Siddhanta is to dwell
effortlessly in the state of transcendent bliss, just as those bound by the ego (dwell in the state of bondage).
To those who are free of the individual consciousness these two are one and the same.  (150)

Just as a coil of rope or a wooden post can be perceived momentarily as a snake or a thief, due to light
conditions or the mental and physical state if the observer, the world, which is just a momentary appearance
in the substratum of the Self, is taken to be real by those under the sway of Maya.

In the supreme state there is no longer a personal self which struggles to make sense of a world which it
sees as alien to itself.  Therefore, the life of a Jnani is literally Muyarchi Ketta - effort less, which we might
also translate as free of the sense of doership. 

The idea in comparing the state of transcendent bliss to the state of bondage appears to be that, just as
those who are subject to the full force of the ego, Anava Malam, never for a moment question it, believing
it to be their natural state, so do those who have transcended the ego equally without questioning it. 
Hence their state is called Muyarchi Ketta Anandaditam - the effortless state of transcendental bliss.

Those who are free of the individual consciousness is a translation of the Tamizh Taan Nandinaarku.
This is glossed by Tiruporur Chidambara Swamigal (TCS) "as those who are free from of the defective
knowledge, which arises objectively as 'oneself."             

The teaching of Vedanta, whose key texts are the Upanishads, emphasizes the eradication of illusion,
the negative aspect of realization, whilst Siddhanta, whose key texts are Agamas, emphasizes the
positive aspect of realization, that of uniting with Sivam, the true substratum of the illusory world appearance.
For those who have attained the final state of realization, when the individual consciousness merges inseparably with the Self and that individual consciousness is annihilated, there is no difference between the two.

Tiru Janana Sambandhar, he of the land of Sirkazhi, he rules us through his grace, he whose divine sport
is Jnana, spoke saying 'Not speaking of One or Two, just be.  Thrice do I swear that this the truth!
(151).

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #67 on: October 05, 2016, 11:17:27 AM »
Chapter 6:

An explanation of non attachment.

The word 'vritti', Sanskrit 'virakti', which is translated as non attachment in the title of this verse means
freedom from attachment.  TCS explains that it refers to inner renunciation, not outer renunciation,
which is the subject of the next chapter, entitled 'turavu', which is the native Tamizh word for renunciation.
The two words are not essentially different in meaning, although the latter, being derived from the verb
'tura' - to leave, relinquish, reject, discard has a more active sense, and is therefore probably more suited
to express outward renunciation.

The sage who drank the ambrosial milk of non dual bliss, from the breast of Parvati (in a cup of gold),
said, 'In a state of true knowledge there is neither suffering nor happiness, and in the state in which the
true knowledge is lost, suffering and happiness manifest, causing delusion.  You are the knowledge
which embraces both of these.    (152).

That the milk from Parvati's breast was served to the young Jnana Sambandhar in a golden cup is attested
by the saint himself in Teveram 3.24.2:  'My father grew angry saying that the food (milk) served to me
in a flower like gold cup was bad.

You are the knowledge which embraces both of these -  The Tamizh text says 'ali arivu nee', which means         
literally You are the androgynous knowledge. The word 'ali' can be used in the sense of neither male nor
female, neuter, or possessing both male and female characteristics, hermaphordite, androgyne.  The Tamizh
lexicon says, 'Hermaphrordite, being which is neither man nor woman wholly.'  TCS glosses as follows:
'He the author, calls jiva (pasu) knowledge 'androgynous knowledge, and the knowledge of the bond
(pasam) - female knowledge, it exists as god knowledge when it unites with god knowledge, and as bond
knowledge when it unites with bond knowledge, in the same way that the hermaphrodite embraces both
the male and female forms.'

Thus the jiva, the individual soul, possesses no inherent consciousness, and therefore no reality, in its own
right.  It comes into existence simply through its identification with the world, and since it has no existence
in itself, it ceases to exist once that identification has ended, in not other than Sivam itself.

It should be pointed out here that the 'bond knowledge' spoken of above should not be taken to mean an
entity existing in its own right, but only an appearance within the Self, Sivam, projected by the jiva out of
its false understanding.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #68 on: October 05, 2016, 11:29:59 AM »
All six religions agree that the final goal is the pure state which results from renunciation and the cutting away
of desire.  Know that this is the state of liberation, free of thirty six 'tattvas', in which there is no more birth.
It is the final state in which all effort comes to an end upon the annihilation of karma.  (153).

The six religious systems which are considered to be Vedic, each being based on a deity of the Hindu
pantheon are: Saivam (Siva), Vaishnavam (Vishnu), Saktam (Sakti), Sauram (Sun), Ganapatyam
(Ganesa) and Kaumaram (Murugan).

TCS says that the author is again (see verse 143) quoting the names of two chapters from the Tiruk Kural
of Tiruvalluvar, chapter 35, 'turvau' - renunciation, and chapter 37, 'avaa aruttal' - The Extirpation of Desire.
He further states that, given the above, Chapter 36, 'mey unartal' - Knowledge of the True is also included
by implication.  The word 'kuudal' --agreement can also mean Madurai, the home of legendary Tamizh
Sanghams.  His commentary therefore indicates that the author is inviting us to imagine that these three
chapters are being read out in Madurai from the Sanga Palakai, which according to the Tamizh Lexicon is
a 'Miraculous Seat capable of accommodating only deserving scholars, believed to have been granted by
Siva at Madurai to the Sangam poets.'

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #69 on: October 05, 2016, 11:45:14 AM »
This book is for those who are free from desire, and could not even bear to be accused of it, just as a
warrior who is willing to die for a cause cannot bear to be accused of cowardice.  It is for those who are like
camel, which will eat anything with relish as if it were well cooked food.  To those who are full of desires,
and are accustomed to good food which bloats the body, it will seem flawed and unacceptable.  (154).

If the worldly bond falls away, the Jiva will automatically come to rest in the Lord, just someone swinging
on a swing will come to rest on the ground if the rope breaks.  Verse (349 of the Tiru Kural) speaks of the ending of births upon the cutting off of the attachments created by desire.  It is just your own understanding?
It is not also the understanding of all other religions everywhere?   (155).

In this comparison the individual self, Jiva, Pasu, is compared to someone swinging on a swing; the ropes
supporting it are the worldly bonds, Pasam, consisting of the mind and senses, and the solid earth
is Pati, Sivam, the Self.  As long as these ropes are in place, the Jiva will swing endlessly forwards and
backwards, oscillating between desire and fear, attraction and revulsion.  However, if the ropes
are cut away, it will come to rest on the solid ground of the Self.

The words 'pattru atra kanne pirappu arukkam - births will end upon the ending of attachments -are
a direct quotation from Verse 349 of Tiruk Kural:  'When attachments are ended, rebirth will be cut off.
Otherwise the impermanent state of birth and death, will manifest over and over again.'

(will be continued from the next issue of Mountain Path).

Arunachala Siva.
                           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #70 on: February 05, 2017, 01:12:42 PM »
Verse 156:

The world appears to you as real, but annihilates you when it subsides.  Even
when you are told that it is inert, a mere consequence of actions, it still whirls you
about in delusion, like someone who has taken poison.  However, the real impediment
to true knowledge is your own defective understanding, the failure to know your true
Self.

When the individual self regards the world it perceives as real, and predicates its entire being upon that reality, as, for example, when it believes that its consciousness resides in the physical brain, it is entirely at the mercy of that fickle pseudo reality, which can do away with it at any moment through its myriad forms of transformation, decay and death. Until it is established in the Self, the jiva will view the absence of the world illusion as a terrifying void.       

Verse  157: 

It is your state of limited, conditional awareness, your nature is veiled by the obscuration of the ego.  However, like a bright, clear crystal, which holds the reflection of the objects but is not affected by them, your essential nature is not affected.  We have now explained to you your nature as the jiva, the form of that the jiva takes,
and your nature as the Self. Reflect carefully upon these matters.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #71 on: February 05, 2017, 02:03:59 PM »
Tirupporur Chidambara Swamigal (TCS) explains the three terms mentioned at the end of the verse ((Verse 157) along the following lines: Supavam, Sanskrit Swabhava - own condition or state of being, refers to the nature of the individual soul or jiva, as being inherently subject to the principle of egoism, Aanava Malam, just as the inherent natujre of the crystal is to take on the colors of the things placed next to it.  Uruvam, Sanskrit Rupa - form, outward appearance, refers to the form or appearance of the jiva, as being
affected by the mind, senses, etc., whilst under the influence of Aanava Malam, just as the crystal is colored in various ways when under the influence of the objects placed next to it. Swarupam, Sanskrit Svarupa - nature, self nature refers to the Self or Sivam, the reality that underlies the individual self, but which cannot be known until veiling of Aanava Malam, is removed, just as the crystal, although intrinsically bright and clear, will not be known as such as long as it is colored by the objects standing next to it.

When the veiling is removed, the jiva is no more, and its substratum, the Self, remains, shining alone in its immaculate, non dual self nature, just as when the objects are removed, the crystal remains, shining clear and bright, unaffected by anything.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             
           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #72 on: February 05, 2017, 02:14:22 PM »
Verse  158:

It (your Self) is free of the states of awareness and forgetting, abiding as all embracing
pure consciousness. Like the ether, it contains all things (yet is not touched by them).
Granting its grace to the jiva, it is like sugar, feeding it with the sweetness of its own
bliss.  To such a one do these three, (i.e. nature as the jiva, form as the jiva, and the form as the Self , mentioned in the previous verse) belong.

The Self is compared to sugar, because the nature of sugar is itself sweetness. Just
as all things made out of sugar taste sweet, all experiences are founded upon the bliss of the Self, whose nature is bliss.  Thus the Self imparts its bliss to itself, in the form of the jiva.

You make all kinds of sweets with various ingredients and in various shapes and they 
all taste sweet because there is sugar in all of them and sweetness is the nature of the sugar. In the same way all experiences and the absence of them contain the illumination which is the nature of the Self.  Without the Self they cannot be experienced, just as without sugar not one of the articles you make can taste sweet.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #73 on: February 06, 2017, 11:28:54 AM »
Verse  159:


Having perceived and grasped (the world through the mind and senses), remaining
entirely submerged in them, and having come to realize the nature of this defective,'
discriminating awareness, to then remain in unattached purity as pure consciousness,
untouched by the five divine operations, the first of which is creation, just as Sivam
remains unattached by these, is true renunciation.

The five divine operations creation, maintenance, destruction, or involution, veiling and the granting of grace, corresponding to the operations of the individual consciousness.  Creation is the arising of the world in conjunction with the mind and senses, and so on. See the notes to Verse 33.

In the same way that Sivam provides the ground for all manifestation, but is totally
unaffected by, and un-involved in it, the task of Jiva is to realize that the appearance of the world that comes and goes in its consciousness ism totally other than itself, and to remain untouched by it.  In doing so, it will transcend that Jiva nature and realize its
true nature as Sivam.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #74 on: February 06, 2017, 04:04:40 PM »
Verse  160:

Who (among Jnanis) will be cognizant of the world in which Jivas live like a swarm
of fireflies in the darkness? Know that to them the dawn of true knowledge is like(the rising of) the sun. (The great ones) have taught the five pure avasthas so that your defilement may be destroyed, just as the sun annihilates your shadow as it reaches the zenith of the heavens.         

The darkness is the darkness of ignorance, Anava Malam, the principle of egoity, and them fireflies are the activities of the Jiva in the world of Maya.  Both this darkness and the feeble, flickering illumination of the Jiva consciousness will be invisible to the consciousness of the Jnani, which bathes in the full light of the sun of it with the feeble
illumination of the intellect, simply does not exist for the Jnani.  It exists only from the
point of view of those who labor under the delusion that they are subject to it.             

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.