Author Topic: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.  (Read 9915 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #45 on: January 17, 2016, 09:34:07 AM »
Verse 124:

Imagine the devotees of the god of Fire, grinding up ginger to ease the god's indigestion, covering him
with straw (to keep him warm), and agonizing (over their previous neglect) a if buried under a mountain
of sorrow.  To whom might we compare such people?  To those who would try to wash water, bury their
own shadow, or measure it (using their own foot)? 

In the medical systems such as Ayurveda, the element fire, personified in the god Agni, is seen as the force
at work in the process of digestion, causing the food to be broken and digested.  Ginger has been recognized
as a cure for indigestion in many cultures since ancient times.

These actions and their fanciful motives -- trying to keep him warm with straw -- are given to emphasize the
ironic nature of ritual acts, in which the Supreme Reality is imagined to be suffering from some kind of need
or lack, to which the person performing the ritual or puja arrogates himself the role of providing the remedy.
Since, as far as we know, the motives ascribed to these actions here are not the actual motives of the persons
who perform those rituals and pujas, the first sentence has been prefaced by the words, 'Imagine that....'


contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #46 on: January 18, 2016, 12:32:49 PM »
Verse 125:

Those stupid teachers (of ritual worship) do not realize that when we have to cross a river in spate
or make a long journey on foot, there is no suffering for the water, nor for the road, but only for
those who swim that water and walk that road.  They might as well tell you to stop up the mouth of
a river in spate, raise a ladder to reach the heavens or grab the feet of the wind.

The teachers who purport to offer salvation by means of ritual worship are called Murkar, a Tamizh
word meaning the foolish, the ignorant.  Just as a river in spate cannot be stopped up with earth,
Sivam, the infinite all embracing reality, cannot be contained in any form, such as an idol or statue;
to try to reach it through form based meditation and so on is pointless because it exists already within
and without as the very ground of our being, just as it is futile to try to use a ladder to reach the ether,
which already contains all things within itself.  Since it transcends all forms, there is no use trying to
grasp it by performing rituals of various kinds, just as it would be no use ascribing form to the wind
and then trying to grasp a part of that form.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   
     
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #47 on: January 19, 2016, 10:53:57 AM »
Verse 126:

Will even those who travel the heavens as will require a support?  Are the heavens like the deep ocean
to them, that they need to navigate it like a helmsman on a ship?  What work do time and space perform?
Similarly, can there be deeds performed by a perfected Siva Yogi?


One has mastered the eight siddhis can travel to wherever he wishes in space through the power of his mind.
He would have no need of any support to aid him.  Similarly the Siva Yogi who has attained oneness with
the Self has no need for aids such as rituals and puja to attain that which is already his.

Expanding the previous analogy, unlike the captain of a ship upon the ocean, the siddha yogi would have
no need to plot a course through the heavens and use a set of instruments to get his destination.  Similarly
the Siva Yogi has no need to form some concept of Sivam and then set about trying to attain That which
he already is.  In any case, he no longer requires, nor possesses, the instruments furnished by the tattvas
in the relative world, the senses, and the organs of thought, and action, which are the attributes of the ego
consciousness.

Just as time and space provide the unmoving ground for all the phenomena that unfold in the manifest world,
the Jnani, as the Self, provides the unmoving ground for the whole of the apparent creation, including time
and space.  TCS glosses:  The faculties operate in the mere presence of that Siva Yogi, who is united with
the fullness of reality. He himself does not engage with any of the faculties to perform any kind of work.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #48 on: January 20, 2016, 09:55:45 AM »
Verse 127:

In fire itself there is nothing of the firewood, and in ghee there is no longer any milk. Similarly, Jnana
abolishes delusion as surely as the sun dispels darkness.  Therefore it is given the name 'Destroyer of
Actions'.  This being so, can there be any performing of degrading actions by Jnanis?

In this verse Jnana is called 'Destroyer of kriya'.  The word kiriyai, Sanskrit kriya, has the meaning of
act, action, in a general sense, in addition to the specific sense of religious practices and rituals, which
are the subject of this chapter.  The word is intended to be understood in both senses here. Just as
firewood is annihilated in the process of burning and milk is annihilated in the making of ghee, all actions
are annihilated in the arising of Jnana.  The sense of doership is an illusion of the ego-consciousness upon
the attainment of Jnana, is no longer affected by this delusion, and remains as one with the unmoving
screen of he Self upon which the world appearance unfolds.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #49 on: January 21, 2016, 10:14:29 AM »
Verse 128:

Even if Jnana is attained through actions, it will not endure, just as all things that are born from a womb
are destined to destruction.  Your thoughts of grasping the Cause of all things (through your actions) is
like trying to roll up ten million suns in a blanket of darkness.

Here it is stated that, even if a degree of Jnana is obtained through ritual actions, it will not be permanent
and will disappear again in time.  Thus it is suggested that, though the paths of Chariyai, Kiriyai, and
Yogam are necessary for the disciple to attain sufficient maturity to be able to find a teacher who can
bestow Jnana, they cannot by themselves bestow that Jnana.  The Jnana that arises through actions
must necessarily pass away, just as all creatures born from the womb are destined to die.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #50 on: January 22, 2016, 10:16:36 AM »
Verse 129:


If, desiring the state beyond even bliss, you say you will engage in actions to attain it, will the true Jnanis
not ridicule you?  Will anyone choose walking as a means of getting to sleep?  Your holy scriptures,
pujas, and samadhis are an aberration to true Jnanis;  they are no more than a collection of conditioned
mental states, Maya's cohorts.

The expression 'state beyond bliss' is a translation of the word, Chukathitham, which is the Tamizh form
of Sanskrit sukhatita (sukha - bliss +  atita = beyond).  The bliss experienced on the loss of ego consciousness
is transcended in the final state of liberation, which is therefore the state beyond bliss.

The words 'a collection of conditioned mental states'  translated the expression chaar potha kottiram.
Kottiram, Sanskrit gotra has as its root meaning 'a protection or shelter for cows, a cowshed, cowpen
(go = cow + tra).  This meaning is expanded to mean family, race, lineage, and, among other things,
genus, class, species.  The verb chaar means to lean upon, rest in or on, be attached to, be connected to,
and potham, Sanskrit bodha, means knowledge, understanding, intelligence;  therefore chaar botham
is knowledge that is attached to, dependent on, something else, in this case, the mental faculties and the
organs of sense and action.  There is only one consciousness, which when pure, merges with the Self,
but when contaminated by Maya, flaunts itself as a separate ego consciousness.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #51 on: January 23, 2016, 10:18:37 AM »
Verse 130:

If it be said that bliss is in the ending of all actions, then we shall hardly need to assert that suffering
is in the arising of actions. Whatever actions we do perform, we should perform, we should perform
them according to the example of those whose only concern is to feed and clothe the body, taking no
pleasure in them, like a barren woman  (with no prospect of bearing children).

The great ones, the realized sages, see the world as false and therefore seek nothing from it
other than the bare essentials required for their physical survival in the world, namely food, clothing
and shelter. They have no attachments in the present, and therefore create no karma to bind them
in the future. In this sense they are like barren woman who, deprived of the ability to have children
(the main reason for her existence), has no offspring to care for in the present, nor any expectation
of having any care for in the future.

***
(will be continued when the next issue of Mountain Path is received.)   

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #52 on: March 30, 2016, 04:15:37 PM »
Verse 131:

To proclaim amidst tears and sobs the holy scriptures, which are the means expressly designed to make
us still; to perform religious rituals; to sit in meditation with the body stretched and contorted postures
designed by the mind--all these things are a comedy show designed for entertaining of Jnanis.

Verse 132:

Who has attained liberation by studying and learning the holy texts, which themselves are insufficient
to contain all the religious systems with their commentaries and interpretations?  To do so is like going
to the lengths of covering the sky with a canopy and the earth with leather when setting out on a journey,
instead of simply wearing sandals and taking an umbrella.  (132)

The words 'holy texts,  which themselves are insufficient to contain all the religious systems, with their
commentaries and interpretations ' translate the Tamizh, chamaya vatham mananam pothata chattiram.
The word Chamayam means religion, and chattriam, Sanskrit Sastra, means, in this text, sacred book or
composition of divine authority.  Each religion, be it Buddhist, Jaina, Saivite or whatever, has its own
set of sacred books, which contain Vatham, Sanskrit Vada - thesis, propositions, arguments, doctrine.
These in turn become the subject of commentaries and discussions as to their true meaning by learned
scholars and holy men, often over many centuries.  These exegeses are known as Yutti, Sanskrit Yukti -
reasoning, argument, proof, inference, induction.  Here the word Manam - mind is used to signify the
latter, a case of metonymy. (Akupeyar in Tamizh), figurative use of a word, with the source of the reasoning
(the mind) being used for the reasoning itself.

The task of someone who tries to fathom all the arguments of all the different religions in the hope that such
a process will finally lead him to liberation is as hopeless as that of someone who, instead of carrying an
umbrella on his journey, tries to mask the entire sky with a canopy, and instead of wearing sandals,
tries to cover his entire path with leather.  The wise disciple adheres strictly to his Guru's teaching, using it
in the same way the traveler employs sandals to protect himself from thorns and stones, and an umbrella
to shield himself from the heat of the sun.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                       
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #53 on: March 31, 2016, 12:11:36 PM »
Verse 133:

The supreme reality is not known (objectively), since, when you become pure consciousness, and then
become the One that makes this consciousness known, both of these come to an end.  Wicked wretches!
How then can you hope to experience that reality through the false understanding in which you grasp it
for a while with ego consciousness, then let it go again?

When the disciple comes to realize  that his nature is pure consciousness, the realization arises within
him that he is also the source of that consciousness, that the two are not different.  At this point the
house cards which is the triad of knower, known, and knowledge collapses, discriminating knowledge
ends and he remains as the non dual Self.  How then can the concept of the Self or Sivam remain?
Therefore, if even those who have realized the Self are themselves quite incapable of experiencing that
state as something separate from themselves, how ludicrous is it that those who have not known
the Self should claim it to be able to do so?

In the latter part of the verse, what is being referred to are the phenomena experienced sometimes
as a result of prolonged spiritual practices, and sometimes spontaneously, in the form of vision of gods
and saints, heightened visual, mental and emotional experiences and so on.  Such experiences are
never permanent, in spite of attempts to prolong them and regain them after they are lost. On these
grounds alone they are therefore known not to be the experience of reality which is being sought.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #54 on: April 01, 2016, 10:07:09 AM »
Verse 134:

Since the destruction of your ego consciousness is His wish, you should consider its loss to be your
own goal also.  Know that Ajnana, ignorance, consists in not knowing how to achieve this loss.
False one, hear then the means of destruction of your ego consciousness.!

The 'He' in the first line is of course Sivam, the Self, the Supreme Reality. Although one cannot talk of
the Self as possessing desire in a literal sense, it is a way of expressing the innate sense that it is in the
nature of the Self to manifest itself in the individual consciousness, overcoming whatever barriers it finds
in its way, transcending it and annihilating it.  It is this innate sense that inspires  the spiritual quest
in the first place.  The problem for the individual is that, having sensed that the loss of ego consciousness
is the desired end, he is at a loss as to how to achieve this goal, since the only tool at his disposal is the very
ego consciousness he is trying to destroy.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #55 on: April 02, 2016, 12:28:04 PM »
Verse 135:

When a stick of firewood is burnt up completely there is no more smoke or flame, and when a disease
is cured, the medicine that was taken to cure it disappears with it.  Similarly your ever ramifying
actions are at the level of the mind (and will end when the mind ends).  Why then do you attempt to unite
(with the Self by means of those actions)?  Simply remain as a pure subject, without a second, just as a
smaller shadow is subsumed in a greater one.

In the first comparison the log of wood is compared to the actions of the individual, and the smoke of fire
to the mental faculties and ego consciousness of the individual. When actions cease, there will be no mental
activity and ego, just when the log is consumed there will be no more smoke and fire.  In the second
comparison, the disease is compared to the ego, and the actions of the individual to the medicine.  When
the ego subsides into the Self there will be no further actions, just as when a disease is cured, there will
be no further need for the medicine that cured it.  In Siddhanta actions with their fruits are the
consequence of succumbing to the illusion of the ego, and they are also ultimately a means for the removal
of that illusion.

Translated literally, the last sentence means, 'Remain (nil) with that which is opposite (ethir) having gone
(poy), as shadow is hidden.'  In other words, remain without the duality of the knower and thing known,
which is the habitual mode of the mind.  Since the mind arises out of the Self, and is fundamentally no
different from it, all it needs to do to realize its unity with the Self is to cease its discriminating activity,
at which point it will be no different from the Self, so long as it does not resume its discriminating activity,
just as a smaller shadow is subsumed in a larger one until such time as it moves beyond the boundary
of the greater shadow.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #56 on: April 03, 2016, 10:39:29 AM »
Verse  136:


You are the consciousness that perceives, and I, the Real, am the consciousness through which you
perceive.  Once you begin to investigate these, they will begin to loosen their hold.  When they finally
fall away, you should feel a degree of shame and not attempt to look back at me, thinking 'I'.  Rather
should you remain still, like a pot sunk in the ocean.

In the state of ignorance the ego, though possessing no reality of its own, attempts to usurp all the
powers of the Self, ascribing them to itself, saying, I did this, I did that, and so on.  When the individual
Jiva begins finally to gain  some insight into its own nature, it is revealed as an impostor and disappears.
It is often therefore described figuratively as 'feeling shame' and 'hanging its head'  when its duplicitous
game is revealed. See Verse 30 of Sri Ramana Maharshi's Ulladu Narpadu, for example:

As the mind, seeking inwardly through inquiry 'Who am I?', reaches the Heart, and as one knows as
'I' bows its head in shame, the One appears spontaneously as 'I - I'.

When the disciple begins to sense the illusory nature of the ego and the world view it generates, and these
begin to fade in the light of the Self, the remnant of the ego-self feels a natural temptation to move its attention
to the Self instead, attempting as it were, to bring it into focus, as though it were a mental creation like itself,
and to grasp it as formerly it had grasped the false.  In this verse, the ego is being advised to know its place,
show some humility and allow itself to be subsumed in the Self, 'amizhttu karakam pol' - like a pot sunk
in the ocean.  A pot on the bottom of the ocean no longer has any function;  it can no longer be used to hold,
dispose, or divide up water or any other liquid.  Similarly the mind, when subsumed in the Self, can no longer
function other than as the Self.  The Jnani is like the pot in the ocean.  His body and mind, if they can still be
called that, function  as the Self only, and have no reality or function apart from the Self.

Contd.,

(The remaining verses will be covered from the Mountain Path issues that come in future.)

Arunachala Siva.                       
« Last Edit: April 03, 2016, 10:48:37 AM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #57 on: July 10, 2016, 01:09:27 PM »
(From Mountain Path. July-Sept. 2016.):

Verse  137:

(To think that the performance of rituals) will pass for the bliss of Sivam is very strange, like a new
bride mistaking the wedding rites for sexual intercourse!  Just as, unmoving, the oil in a lamp spreads
(through the wick and is consumed) by the flame, the true state is to give yourself up to be consumed
(by the Self). 

Just as a naive girl might be imagined to mistake the marriage rites for the act of physical union,
the immature disciple mistakes the outward forms of religion, which lead up to union with Sivam,
for the union itself.

Chapter 5:

Transcending the path of Chariyai.

According to its title, in this short chapter the author explains how a preoccupation with Chariyai,
the lower of the four paths, that of service to the deity, is antagonistic to the goal of realization of
Sivam, the Self.  However, in fact most the verses are of a general nature, whilst three pillory the
bogus jnani, who feigns enlightenment in his conduct and appearance. (Verses 141-143).

Verse  138:

When will there be happiness for those who do not subside inwardly, but instead, thinking these activities
to be the means of liberation, torment their bodies with pilgrimages, bathing in holy tanks and observing
fasts on days which they deem auspicious?  Their present lot is suffering only.  When will their
objective consciousness be lost and bliss arise in them?               

Verse 139:

You lost souls, it seems you never asked if, the personal consciousness having died, you should not go
about in the world as if your body were a walking corpse!  Where have you heard that the body can be got
rid of through the efforts of the body itself?

Verse 140:

If you ask us what place we have come from just now, and if we have forgotten what place it is, when
you ask us the way to that place, all roads will seem the same, as if the seven worlds have merged
into one.


contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   


Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #58 on: July 10, 2016, 04:01:26 PM »
If someone, who does not remember the place from which he has come, gives directions to that place
to someone who asks for them, the information given will be entirely useless. Since the person giving
the directions does not know them himself, the person following those directions will have no hope of
finding the correct path.  In a similar way, enlightenment cannot be gained  by someone who receives
instruction from a guru who has not experienced that state himself.

The meaning is not entirely clear but as the next three verses, (141-143) lampoon the false teacher,
this is probably the correct interpretation. Though the exact meaning is not clear, it seems to be that all
roads taken by one following the wrong directions will be the same, in that they are not the right road
and will not lead to the correct destination.  In the same way, all courses of action taken by one acting
on the instructions of a false guru will be the same, in that all will be fruitless, and will not lead to union
with Sivam.

Verse 141:

Displays of ochre robes, long strings of rudraksha beads, white ash, and white teeth (from abstaining
from chewing betel) constitute the counterfeiting of Jnana.  To those who know the nature of the all-
pervading Sivam, the One who is free of all desire (pathi), the jiva the one of limited, worldly knowledge
(pasu), and the worldly bond (pasam), which is unreal, will there be such things as word or form?             

The Saiva sannyasi traditionally wears robes dyed with Kaavi - red ochre, and long strings of rudraksha
beads, here referred to simply as taazh vadam - necklace which hangs low.  The exposed parts of the
body are usually liberally smeared with Tiru Neeru - holy ash, which is made from cow dung rendered
to a powder in a kiln.  The ascetic is forbidden to chew betel, therefore his teeth are white, unlike those
of a house holder, which are strained reddish color from its juices. 

The wearing of the insignia of a Jnani by one who is not qualified by his spiritual attainment to do so
is called Jnana KaLavu, literally the stealing of Jnana.  These insignia belong to Jnana, true knowledge,
only;  the wearing of them by anyone else, therefore, constitutes robbing Jnana of what rightfully
belongs to it.  In the translation, the idea has been turned around somewhat to say the counterfeiting
of jnana, the idea of false jnani faking jnana being more understandable in English than that of him ,
as it were, stealing its intellectual property.

The reference in the latter part of the verse is to the Siddhanta triad of Pathi - God, pasu - the soul,
and pasam - the worldly bond.  Here God is referred to as Puranan as the one who constitutes the
fullness of Realtiy, other than which nothing is or can be.  The jiva is referred to as Chitrarivan, as
possessing imperfect, limited, (Siru), i.e. worldly, knowledge (Arivu).

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.,                 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #59 on: July 11, 2016, 11:22:00 AM »
Verse  142:

They flash their white teeth, which are all well suited to the dispensation of limited, worldly knowledge;
they display their erudition, flourishing weighty tomes;  they wear ochre robes and ear rings.  They wear
a rudraksha bead, in a golden locket around their necks; they sit in meditation with the eyeballs rolled
upwards, as if they have transcended the thirty six tattvas.  Yet all this is but the work of a great maya,
that whirls (like a toy windmill).

The inferior teachers, though they try to impress by their clothing and demeanor, are not capable
of conveying higher truths relating to Jnana.  Therefore their teaching is restricted to matters of ritual,
yoga postures, meditation techniques and so on.  Because these concern only the limited ego consciousness,
they are called Pasu Margam -- the path of Jiva, rendered in the translation as 'the dispensation of worldly   
knowledge.'

The text does not specifically mention a golden locket, but says simply 'kattu', which means 'tie', 'fastening',
'knot', 'ligature', in this case, something tied around the neck, specifically a 'kevadu', or 'kevadam',
which the Tamizh lexicon glosses as, 'rudraksha' bead enclosed in a gold or silver case and tied on the arm
or neck, as a badge, amulet or charm.'

The words (as if) in the penultimate clause are not in the text, but are added to make it clear that the
teachers in question are not actually in the transcendent state they claim to be.  This is clear from the
context of the verse; it is also clear from many of the preceding verses, which point out that the state
of manolaya -- total subsidence of the mind induced by meditational practices, is not the true transcendent
state of realization.  The Tamizh word employed here, 'kanchimittu', which has been translated as
'with their eye balls rolled upwards'  usually means blinking or winking.  The translation here follows
Tiruporur Chidambara Swamigal (TCS) who glosses, adopting yoga postures with the eyes rolled upwards.
The idea is to present a picture of the false teacher as both ludicrous in his deluded self importance and
unscrupulous in his deliberate attempt to deceive his disciples.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.