Author Topic: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.  (Read 9918 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #30 on: October 18, 2015, 05:02:46 PM »
Verse  109 of Ozhivil Odukkam:

When you think of it, is it feasible to measure  and know the extent of earth and the heavens,
the weight of the mountains and the volume of the surging ocean? Similarly, when you say that
you are the Real, these are only words, (since it cannot be measured or known), without encompassing
the destruction of your own ego self. If you try to know it otherwise,. it will remain quite alien from you.
(109).

There are a number pf ways of interpreting the latter part of the verse, but the overall sense is as follows:
the discriminating consciousness cam affirm, 'I am the Real', but it cannot know that the reality
objectively, since the Real is only revealed upon the destruction of the discriminating consciousness,
that is attempting to know it.  Should on make that attempt, the Real will seem alien and unobtainable.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #31 on: October 20, 2015, 06:44:37 PM »
Ozhivl Odukkam:

Verse 110:


The world of Maya, arising and subsiding by turns,is unreal like the clouds in the sky. If we do not realize
this, and attempt to suppress the world that rises up using the mind that rises with it, will this not be
like a ball, bouncing back again each time we hit it to the ground?  Therefore, observe it as the witness
only.  It will be like a tree dug up by the root, yielding neither flowers nor fruits. (110).

The literal meaning in the second sentence here is, 'If (one) suppresses that which rises up with that
which rises up.  Uthippu is a noun from which the verb 'uti', which means to spring up, arise,come into
existence. Since the world and the mind arise together in consciousness, the word is suited to conveying
both meanings.  The repetition of the word prefigures the idea of bouncing back and forth,as of the ball
in the metaphor which follows, and also lends weight to the idea being presented here that the world and
the mind are not in essence different, that they are the two sides of the same coin, as it were.

Thus an attempt on the part of the mind to suppress the world will cause the world to 'bounce back'
as it were, prompting further mental activity in never ending vicious circle.  The alternative to engaging
in the fruitless activity described in the first part of the verse is simply to remain as witness.  If the mind,
the discriminating consciousness,  is eliminated, there will be no world of the mind and senses, just as,
if the root of a tree is ripped out, it will produce neither flowers nor fruits.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   


 
« Last Edit: October 20, 2015, 06:51:12 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #32 on: October 22, 2015, 05:08:55 PM »
Verse 111:

Should you succeed even for a split second in reaching the state of absorption in the Self, (nishta),
which is as the pure state (Chuttam), in which the discriminating consciousness has fallen away,
is free of all limitation, ah! I am at a loss to describe it!  Is the bliss that rises up then a thing of little
account?   It would be as if one accessed  the vast ocean of milk through the tiny hole in a tear!  (111)

Chuttam is the pure state is the state of Jagrat Sushupti  - waking sleep, a state which is neither waking
but one of total freedom which transcends both of these states. See the notes to Verse 106.

The bliss of the Self is compared to the ocean of milk, churned by the gods and asuras, to obtain divine
ambrosia;   the experience of the infinite bliss of the Self whilst still in the body upon the loss of the
discriminating consciousness is compared to gaining access to the Puranic ocean of milk through the
tiny hole of a teat.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2015, 10:41:59 AM »
Verse 112 of Ozhivil Odukkam:

Being totally identified with the body, you torment yourself saying, 'When will the time come to this body
is no more, and divine grace will be mine?'  What is the use of this?  Do not the myriad phenomena that
appear in ether eventually subside again?  Similarly, in the absolute fullness of Reality, which is beyond
duality, there is nothing other than yourself?    (112)

Puranam - the absolute fullness of Reality, is said here to be 'ethir arra', which means literally without
that which is opposite to, in front of, over against it.  In other words, in that Puranam, there exists no
'other', which could take as its object.  'Ethir arra' has therefore been translated as beyond duality.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     


Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #34 on: October 24, 2015, 05:26:34 PM »
Verse 113 of Ozhivil Odukkam:


Know that the habit is pernicious.  A fowl will scratch even at a bare rock, and dig around even in a heap
of paddy.  The blind man who  recovers his sight will feel threatened by the light, recoil from it and refuse
to give up his walking stick.  Similarly the Jiva will persist in perceiving distinction in the grace of the Self
(even after realizing its non dual nature).    - 113.

Verses 113-116 demonstrate how, due to ingrained habit, the discriminating ego-consciousness will have
the tendency to reassert itself at the first opportunity until it is finally eradicated.

The phrase 'amma arulai pakkuvam' means literally the Jiva will divide grace.  The verb 'paku' in its
transitive form means to divide, distribute, apportion, allot.   The Jiva will not be able to hold onto the
Self if it attempts to divide it, i.e. analyze it with the discriminating mind. The expression 'pakuttarivu'
is commonly used in the sense of discriminating knowledge, rationality.  In this verse, 'arul' -grace
is equated with the Self or Sivam.  As mentioned previously, in Siddhanta 'arul'  is nothing other than the
Sakti of Sivam itself, in its active role of removing the three malams and conferring enlightenment.

Unless you slap it and drive it outside, a young calf will not leave its tethering post, even if you untie the rope.
Likewise, even if you tell the Jiva to abode as Sivam, so that it remains free of attachment like Sivam, itself,
thus removing its separate identity and bringing it to a state of oneness, it will  revert to its dualistic mode of
thought.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2015, 12:18:36 PM »
Verse No. 114 of Ozhivil Odukkam:

A young calf may be so used to bring tied up that it does not know what to do when its tether is removed.
The farmer has to slap it to drive outside,  where it will find its mother and be able to enjoy her milk.  Similarly
the unripe disciple, having been guided toward the state of the Self  by the guru, will, out of sheer habit,
return to his habitual dualistic state of mind, trying to analyze the state he is in, and will therefore be unable
to enjoy the bliss of the Self.  TCS glosses: 'Although it has been made one with Siva, the jiva, which  became one with it through the cessation of the ego-consciousness, will become two (again) through the movement of that ego-consciousness.'

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #36 on: October 26, 2015, 04:03:11 PM »
Verse 115 of Ozhivil Odukkam:

If someone tells you to abide as Sivam, you torment yourself thinking, 'I am that Siva', thus falling
from that very state. This is like the story of the man who, on being told not to think of a monkey,
was unable to stop thinking about it.  Is this not the work of the ego, anava malam? (115)'


Sri Ramana Maharshi also alludes to the story of the man who is told not to think of a monkey, supposedly
saying that it is mentioned by Tayumanavar.

Devotee:  When we attempt to cease from activity the very attempt is action.  So activity seems to be inevitable.

Maharshi:  True. Tayumanavar has also alluded to it.  A doctor advises a patient to take the prescribed medicine with only one condition.  That  condition is not think of a monkey with only one condition.  That condition is not to think of a monkey when he takes the medicine.  Can the patient ever take the medicine?
Will he not think of the monkey whenever he tries not to do so?  So also, when people try to give up thoughts their object is frustrated  by their very attempt. (Talks.No. 601)

Translator's   Note: The attribution by Sri Ramana of this anecdote to Tayumanavar is probably due to an
error on the part of the recorder, as no such anecdote appears in the known works of Tayumanavar and
Sri Ramana Himself  is not likely to have made such a misattribution.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #37 on: October 27, 2015, 03:21:25 PM »
Verse 116:  Ozhivil Odukkam:

Although the nature of the ego consciousness has been pointed out to them, they still seek Sivam,
just as the serpent with a jewel on its head continues to seek out darkness, even when it is already
enveloped by it. Such behavior is akin to someone digging a well in a lake to find water, for fighting
with his own shadow to be free of it.   Who are they that have the power remove this ego consiousness
and abide as Sivam?   (116)


In this comparison it is assumed that the jewel on the head of the serpent emits its own light. Therefore
however deep it burrows, the darkness in which it would otherwise be enveloped (the undifferentiated
Self) will always be dissipated by the light of that jewel (the discriminating consciousness).  Similarly,
Sivam will always evade who seek it through their own ego consciousness.  If the serpent follows the
jewel, the natural darkness will re-assert itself, and there will be no need to seek it,just as, when the ego
consciousness is turned inward and subsides, there is no need to seek Sivam.

***

Contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           


Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2015, 04:26:19 PM »
Verse 117 of Ozhivil Odukkam:

Abandoning formal worship, both inner and outer, yogic samadhis and those sleep like states,
in which the kriya yogis mimic the true Jnanis who are free of the discriminating consciousness,
the the true Jnani who are free of the discriminating consciousness , the true Jnanis abide in the Self,
so that the worldly bondage disappears, like the flame of a lighted lamp in day light or the rays of
from a crystal at midday.  Who can compare them? (117)

The verse begins with another reference to meditation on the six energy centers of the body,
each with its radiant deity, the aaru athaaram.  The yogi becomes identified with each of these in turn,
using intensive concentration and visualization techniques. See also Verse 94 and notes.

The aim of such practices is to raise up the energies of the gross and subtle bodies along the spinal
column, and to concentrate them in the Brahmarandhra center, located in the brain, at which point
the mind becomes totally dormant as in deep sleep.  This state is condemned by the Jnani as worse
than useless because the mind and mental faculties resume their former activities once it is ended,
but and because the individual, in such a state, is deprived of any further opportunity to seek the true
goal of merging definitely with the Self or Sivam.  He may give up tat search,  mistakenly regarding this
state as ultimate goal.

In the state of realization the individual ego, which was so prominent in its former state of ignorance,
is subsumed in the Self losing its individual activity.  Similarly the flame of a lighted lamp, although
shining brightly in the darkness of night, becomes invisible during the day, being entirely subsumed
in the bright light of the sun.  Also, in the state of realization, all the mental faculties (here referred to as
'pasam' - the worldly bond)  subside into the Self and become inactive. In a similar way, a crystal or
prism will emit colored rays in all directions when the light strikes it at various angles during the morning
and evening, but still will remain  clear when the rays of the sun fall from directly overhead at midday.

***

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2015, 03:56:01 PM »
Verse 118 of Ozhivil Odukkam:

The Self now awakens the Jiva from darkness of absolute nescience, (unites it with the mind and senses),
and (finally) abolishes the objective delusion of waking, and sleep, gradually consuming the ego consciousness as the flame consumes the wick of a lamp.  Therefore the only recourse is to give oneself up as a prey to the Self,
the one who devours one's ego consciousness.  The very act of thinking about it will drive it away from you.
(118).

In Saiva Siddhanta the soul is pictured as being initially sunk in a state of total nescience.  It is only Sivam
that, bringing in contact with the thirty six tattvas, causing it to experience the three malams, and finally
eradicating those defilement through the power of its grace, can lead to the state of oneness with itself. Once
it becomes united with the tattvas, the Jiva alienates between Sakalam (waking, dreaming, in which a manifold objective world appears, in gross and subtle form respectively, and Kevalam (deep sleep), which
although a state of non differentiation in which no world appears, is not the state of absolute nesceince,
referred to previously.               

Since it is impossible for the mind to seek the Self, it can only present itself in a condition of submission,
where it can easily be subsumed in the Self.  It therefore must offer itself up a prey, as it were, to be
devoured by the Self.

contd.,

Arunachala  Siva.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2015, 04:02:05 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #40 on: October 29, 2015, 03:12:11 PM »
Verse 119 of Ozhvil Odukkam:


Even the Advaitins, who assert that all that they know objectively is false, cannot escape being trapped
in an empty Void.  Like them you will be destined to repeated births and deaths.  However, having experienced the loss of your ego-consciousness, and the Bliss that arises thereafter, if you transcend even these, birth and death will end for you.   (119)   

The danger, even for the Advaitin, is that, having realized the essential emptiness of all phenomena,
if he does not then eradicate the consciousness, the formerly perceived the world and now perceives an
empty void, he will remain trapped in that empty void, unable to grasp the dynamic reality of the non dual
Self. Bhagavan said: 

'In all books of Vedanta you will find this question of a void or of nothing being left, raised by the disciple
and answered by the Guru.  It is the mind that sees objects and has experiences and that finds a void
when it ceases to see and experience, but that is not 'you'.  You are the constant illumination that lights up
both  the experiences and the void. It is like a theater light that enables you to see the theater, the actors
and the play while play is going on but also remains alight and enables you to say that there is no play
when it is all finished.' (Day by Day with Bhagavan, 21st July 1946.) 

The falling away of the individual consciousness is succeeded by one of deep bliss.  However, since there is
still some trace of consciousness experiencing these states, they too cannot be the final state, and they
too are transcended in the final state of  union with the Self.


contd.,

Arunachala Siva. 
             
« Last Edit: October 29, 2015, 03:26:50 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #41 on: October 30, 2015, 05:48:23 PM »
Verse 120 of Ozhivil Odukkam:


Sivam is the fullness of perfection which abides as the consciousness of consciousness itself;
as that which is entirely without divisions. For those who presume to create and destroy Sivam
in their minds, meditating on it sporadically, and in such a way that it is limited by their own
imperfection, how can birth be avoided?     (118)

The text 'arivikku arivu', literally the consciousness of consciousness itself.  This is pure consciousness,
pure being, that remains as the sustaining core of the relative or discriminating consciousness,
'chuttarvu' in Tamizh.

Having gained some intuitive sense the greater reality that is the background to their existence,
people will try to grasp that intuitive knowledge mentally; having failed in one approach, they
will abandon it and adopt other strategies, also based on the mind.  And also they will carry on,
creating and destroying their false conception of Sivam.  The latter part of the verses describes the
manner in which the creation and destruction of Sivam takes place.  It is done in a manner which does
no justice at all to its all embracing, absolute nature and Sivam is thus limited, restricted (or rather
to be so), by the very attempt to think about it.  However elevated the concept, the mind is unable
to maintain it without straying and forgetting what it was thinking about previously.  Thus it is done
'maravaiyumay' --with forgetfulness, punctuated by periods of forgetfulness, here translated as
sporadically.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #42 on: October 31, 2015, 05:18:22 PM »
Verse 121 of Ozhivil Odukkam:


Even as I reveled ceaselessly in the alternating states of remembering (Waking and Dream) and
forgetting (Deep sleep), the mind's delusion, the appearance of a world of diversity and the
consequent desire and aversion.  Jnana Sambandhar transformed me through his gaze and
through his touch into his own likeness, as the sun dispels the darkness, and the philosopher's
stone transforms base metal into gold.        (121)         

Forgetting and remembering are glossed by TCS as equivalent to 'kevalam' -deep sleep,
and 'chakalam' - waking and dream. In the states of relative consciousness, 'marappum
ninaippum ' - forgetting (deep sleep), and remembering (waking), the jiva suffers from
'mayakku'- delusion as to its true nature, and becomes identified with the body. From this
identification arises 'vikarpu', 'vikaarpam' - the world of diversity, which in turn engenders
attachment in the form of 'veruppu' and 'viruppu' -aversion and desire, which are the source of
the deeds whose fruits give rise to the cycle of births.

Saivite initiation, 'diksha', is performed by the threefold agency of sight, touch and thought.
TCS points out that the latter is to be understood as includes here, as the first two could not take
place without the third.

contd., 


The further verses and commentary will be taken up, once the next issue of Mountain Path, is received.

Arunachala Siva.         
« Last Edit: October 31, 2015, 05:31:39 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #43 on: January 15, 2016, 01:39:31 PM »
Chapter 4- Transcending the Path of Kiriyai:


In this chapter the author explains how addiction to the path of ritual activity, performed without
true insight, constitutes in the end, a barrier to realization, in a similar way that yoga was shown to do
in the previous chapter.

Verse 122:

Instead of remaining still, realizing that the world of tattvas is inert, and remaining free of all contact
with it (seeing nothing) like the eye of the dead ram, they invoke (the presence of Gods), perform worship
to them call upon them as 'The Absolute Perfection', seek them out in (in holy sthalas), and when they
cannot find them, roll on the ground in despair and weep.  Their actions are akin to the grotesque dance
of a band of demons.       

In the first part of the verse, the Tamizh says literally 'placing and raising up', referring to the setting
up of images of the gods, and the invoking of their presence in those images.  This is glossed by TCS
as follows:  Using the personal consciousness to invoke in an image the presence of the absolute
perfection of Sivam, which remains on the destruction of that very personal consciousness, to meditate
upon it repeatedly, and in this manner perform puja to it.

In other words, since Sivam, the Real, is revealed only upon the destruction of the personal consciousness,
it is entirely self defeating to employ that personal consciousness in an attempt to invoke that Reality,
through ritual practices.

The Jnani is entirely free of the discriminating consciousness, and is therefore not aware of the world
of the people and objects, that the others see:  'the eyes of the Jnani are likened to the eyes of a dead
goat; they are always open, never closed.  They glitter but they see nothing, though it seems to others
that they see everything.'  (Ramana Maharshi quoted by Suri Nagamma in Letters from Sri Ramanasramam,
26th October 1947.)

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #44 on: January 16, 2016, 01:26:39 PM »
Verse 123:

In those who, wearied by ritual activities, come to him asking for instruction, the illustrious One fosters
the bliss of the Self, so that they dwell in silence. He is the true guru.  As for the rest, know that,
in so far as they cause the slightest movement in the minds of their disciples, they will be like Brahma,
the creator of worlds, and the Lord of Death.     

'The Illustrious One' is a translation of the Seeman, which is a Tamizh form, based on the nominative
Shriman of the Sanskrit word Shrimat, meaning (one who is) possessed of fortunate, fortunate, auspicious,
wealthy, prosperous, eminent, illustrious, venerable.  Here the Guru is meant, as possessing the greatest
wealth of all, the knowledge of Sivam.

When the mind arises, the world arises with it, and when the mind subsides, the world is no more.
Therefore the false teacher will be like Brahma, the creator of the worlds, in so far as his instruction
causes movement in the minds of his disciples, and he will be like the Death, in that he condemns them to the repeated death and birth of the illusory mind-body complex, as the mind continually arises and subsides
by turns at the prompting of the false guru's instruction.


contd.,

Arunachala Siva.