Author Topic: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.  (Read 9917 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2015, 02:51:24 PM »
Verse 94:-

To attain the state of Samadhi, remaining motionless like a wooden post through control of the breath, which
is not (naturally) under conscious control, is comparable to the fate of a dumb blind man who has consumed
poison, and who, in walking to a certain place, stumbles into a deep pit in a desolate area.

The word Samadhi here is to be understood as the state in which the Sadhaka becomes one with the object
of meditation, as all mental activity is repressed.  It does n not refer to the final state of non dual realization.
The first state is known as Manolaya - the subsiding of the mind, and the second as Manonasam - destruction
of the mind.  Sri Ramana Maharshi describes the difference between the two states in Verse 13 of Upadesa Undiyhar.

'Cessation of the mind is of two kinds: in manolaya the mind is in abeyance, but in manonasam the mind has died.
A mind that is in abeyance, but still exists, can spring forth again, but if its form has been annihilated, it cannot
arise again.'

The phrase "arivu adanga" - which should not or does not subside through conscious control may also be taken
to refer to the Yogi himself rather to his breath, in which case, it would mean not subsiding consciously, i.e
the Yogi is not consciously entering the Heart, rather is he subsiding into the temporary state of laya. Thus
he is undergoing a diminution in consciousness, not the ultimate expansion of it, as in realization.

In the latter part of the verse, the yogic aspirant is called blind and dumb because he cannot see or communicate
the real truth.  He wanders into a desolate area, far from his true home in the Self, having consumed the poison,
which are his yogic techniques, and falls into a pit, which represents the state of manolaya, subsidence of the
mind, which is the fruit of those yogic practices. Since he entered into the course of action voluntarily, his
plight is even more to be deplored than that of the dumb, blind man, which is not of his choosing.     

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2015, 11:45:47 AM »
Verse 95:

With your spiritual jargon, yogic postures and staring gaze, you act out a ludicrous pantomime of spiritual
practice. Give up these worthless habits and remain motionless, as the pure consciousness which is all-
embracing like the heavens, and in which there is neither knowing nor absence of knowing.

Chidambara Swamigal says in his commentary that the staring gaze refers to the yogi fixing his gaze
firmly on the tip of his nose or between his eyebrows. To do all this, the author says,  is to act out a
ludicrous travesty of spiritual austerities.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #17 on: July 07, 2015, 09:20:56 AM »
Verse 96:

The yogi practices Samadhi, burying himself beneath the tattvas. Could we blame anyone for calling him an
ego based fool?  Devoid of all common sense he is like someone who proposes to strip of the bark off a stone
to tie up an elephant, which even a tethering post cannot restrin, or someone who runs about trying to grasp
the ether.

The kriya yogi employs breathing techniques devised by the mind to control the breath, a process which in
turn causes the mind to subside. It is this state of mano laya - subsiding the mind, referred to previously in
the Verse 94, that he mistakes for realization. Thus in using the tattvas to create this illusion of realization,
he is using them as a mattangu - cloak to mask his real, underlying state, which is one of ignorance, thus
perpetuating that ignorance.

The yogi is termed char potha piththan - a madman who relies on objective consciousness. The discriminating,
objectivising consciousness is synonymous with the ego, the jiva, since in the Self there is no 'self' and 'other'.
The division of 'knower' and 'thing known' can only exist in this limited and illusory form of awareness.
The verb 'char' means to depend on, repose on, adhere to, therefore, char potham is the objective, discriminating
awareness that is characteristic of the ego, and which exists only by grasping onto that which it perceives as
exterior to itself. The yogi is called a madman because not only does he employ this form of consciousness,
but in taking it to be real, he develops it to the point where he convinces himself that this illusion is in fact the
reality of the Self, just as the madman has no idea that he is mad.

To attempt to realize the Self using the mind is doubly ridiculous; in the first place it is impossible, like trying
to strip the bark of a stone, which does not have bark, and secondly, even if it were possible, it would be totally
inadequate for the purpose, just as a strip of bark would be useless to restrain a full grown elephant.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2015, 09:51:36 AM »
Verse 97:

To undergo modifications of consciousness in the false world, which is like seeing one's reflection in ghee,
or like seeing a person in the sky in the form of that reflection; to become one with lights or sounds and
then to withdraw from those states -- these are the activities of those who do not know their true Self.

The world of the tattvas is compared to ghee. The image one sees in it is simply a distorted reflection of
one's own personal consciousness, just as the face one sees in ghee is a distorted reflection of one's own
face.

The technique of meditation on the shadow person is described in the Verse 10.  Having seen his own
reflection in the ghee of the tattvas, the yogi then projects that reflection in the form of the deity
on which he is meditating, just the person performing the 'shadow person' meditation projects his
own image to the heavens.

Light is associated with Shakti tattva, also known as 'vindhu', Sanskrit 'bindu', and sound with Siva
tattva, also known as 'nada', Sanskrit 'nada'. These are the highest of the five pure tattvas, the source
of all the other tattvas.  The yogi is here described as reaching these lofty regions of consciousness
through his concentration and meditation practices, only fall back again into the lower states of
consciousness.             

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #19 on: July 09, 2015, 10:34:47 AM »
Verse 98:-

The Jnani rejects and eradicates the tattvas in order to merge into the absolute even in the waking state;
the kriya yogi attempts to emulate him by enveloping himself in the tattvas, taking his perceptions to be
real, just as the monkey who looks into a mirror sees his reflection as another real life monkey.  Since he
has eliminated the tattvas and knows the true state, the Jnani will reject the kriya yogi's practices as worthless.

The idea that the kriya yogi is like the jnani in what he is attempting to do, which is to transcend the tattvas and
attain the state of liberation, but quite unlike him in his methodology, which leads him to get ever more entangled
in the tattvas his very attempts to transcend them.

Like the monkey who, when he looks into the mirror, thinks he is seeing another real monkey rather than his
own reflection, the kriya  yogi takes the results of his mind based practices to be real, whilst they are in truth
mere reflections of his own discriminating consciousness.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2015, 09:32:28 AM »
Verse 99:-

You so called tapasvin!  You are a fool whose thinking is like that of someone who seeks a cover to mask the
heavens,  rather than just closing his eyes! In this madness, due to the way you have been taught, or to
illustrations drawn from the Sastras, or to your own perversity of mind, or to your habitual mode of thinking,
or to something else altogether? What kind of yoga is this?

In the simile employed in this verse the eye is the discriminating consciousness, the cover is the mind based 
yogic practices, and the sky is the objective world of tattvas.  Not realizing that this discriminating mind, the ego
self, is itself a part of that perceived external world, he attempts to use it to blot out that world, expecting thus
to merger with the Real, whilst all he needs to do is to close the eye, by turning his attention away from the world
and dwelling upon the Self. In attempting to blot out the world he is merely trying to mask one unreality with
another.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #21 on: July 10, 2015, 05:39:06 PM »
Verse 100:-

Like someone who mounts an elephant facing its tail in order to travel to his destination, will your ego consciousness
ever be able to reach the Self?  This (your attempt to know the Self as separate from yourself) is an occasion for
much hilarity, like someone who attempts to seek out the demon which possesses and animates him, even though
it is already clearly known to him.

Someone who mounts an elephant facing its tail will never reach the desired destination, just as someone who tries
to reach the Self using his personal, ego awareness will never reach it, since he will be traveling in the opposite
direction, towards the world of the mind and the senses.

Building on the sentiment of the first part of the verse, in the last part of the verse the very idea of 'reaching'
the Self is dismissed as ridiculous.  We are always the Self, whether we realize it or not, so it is ludicrous to
attempt to communicate with it objectively, just as it would be ludicrous for a man possessed by a demon to
attempt to seek out that demon, possessing him and controlling his actions, is necessarily already clearly
known to him.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #22 on: July 11, 2015, 09:36:18 AM »
Verse 101:

Will sleep come to you if you summon it, rubbing your thighs, making snoring noises, and pretending to be
unaware of your body?  You compete good for nothings, if you try to mentally grasp the being consciousness
bliss, that manifests only after destroying your ego consciousness, will it not conceal itself from you?

If one actively attempts to induce sleep, by thinking about it, it will not come. In order for sleep to come, one needs
to be in a relaxed state in which thoughts can subside and the state of sleep can supervene.  Similarly, the state of
the Self can only supervene when all objective thought ceases and one subsides into that Self.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2015, 11:02:29 AM »
Verse 102:

Since oneself is not alone as a primal entity in one's own right, and since the Absolute is the all embracing
perfection, which is not different from oneself, then what good does it do to torment oneself in mind, word
and deed, loudly proclaiming, 'The Self is is beyond all measure!'

Individual consciousness is not some primal entity, possessing an inherent reality of its own.  Therefore reality
must be sought by looking within, to discover the real primal entity, the Self, from which one can never be
separate, described here as 'neekkam aRRa puranam - all embracing perfection which is not separate from oneself.
The words 'loudly proclaiming' translate, albeit rather weakly the Tamizh words 'vaay paraiyarayil (en aam)' --   
what good is there, in proclaiming with the drum of the mouth.  Literally, the verb 'paraiyarai' means to publish
by beat of drum. The 'parai' is a drum beaten to gain the attention of the populace in preparation for a public
proclamation. The verb is prefaced with the word 'vaay - mouth, in order to suggest the self important and
portentous utterances of those who falsely ascribe to themselves the most lofty spiritual attainments,
having merely deluded themselves through their yogic practices. Since the Self is beyond the mind and senses,
it is idle to pontificate about it in a way which subtly implies that one can convey the very knowledge of the
Self, which one has just said, is impossible to communicate verbally.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #24 on: July 13, 2015, 10:08:31 AM »
Verse 103:

Can it be reasonable that, having controlled your breath, mind, and sight, so that they are entirely still, and
buried yourself in that state so that you are entirely submerged in it, you should expect to be able to merge
with That, which exists both within and without your body as your very Self, as being and non being, and
that which is beyond both of these?

All categories known or imagined by the mind, even being and non being, are entirely transcended by the
Self.  Mere suppression of the activity of the mind and senses is worse than useless for the task of seeing
the Self that lies beyond them. See also verse 894.where this point is forcefully expressed.  In the latter
part of the verse, we are reminded of the line from the Kandhar Anubhuti of Arunagiri Nathar, describing
the nature of Lord Muruga:  "uruvaay aruvaay; uLathay ilathaay..." - as that which has form, as that which
is without form; as that which is, as that which is not. In the state of realization all things have no existence
in themselves but they do have an existence in the Self;  therefore, they partake, in a sense, of the nature
of both being and non being appearing within the Self, which is beyond both.

The following is the original Tamizh verse of Arunagiri Nathar, from his Kandhar Anubhuti: (Verse 51).

உருவா யருவா யுளதா யிலதாய்
மருவாய் மலராய் மணியா யொளியாய்
க்கருவா யுயிராய்க் கதியாய்
விதியாய்க்குருவாய் வருவா யருள்வாய் குகனே.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           
« Last Edit: July 13, 2015, 04:49:49 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2015, 03:23:41 PM »
Verse 104:

Should you propose to remain free (of all the mental faculties), you will find that it is not possible, and that a
sleep like state supervenes; and should you attempt to remain(aware but) without any objective perception,
you will experience (such phenomena as) flashing lights. Your aim is to establish the vital breath along with
the errant mind in the brahmarandhra chakra within the skull! What kind of state is this!

If the mind is suppressed completely the result is manolaya -- the subsiding of the mind. See Verse 94 here.
This state is here called 'uRakkam, - sleep because in essence it is no different from dreamless sleep. Once it
ends the mind springs forth again as before.  Alternatively, if one allows the mind to remain active but free of
any object, it will simply create its own phenomena, such as flashing lights, sounds, bodily sensations, and so on.
The word 'maNtai' - skull is here used o refer to the brahmarandhra center, which is said to be located in the
hollow space between the two hemispheres of the brain; 'brahma rnadhiram', Sanskrit 'brahma randhra' means
fontanelle, the aperture in the crown of the head; it is closely associated with the highest of the Chakras, the
Sahasrara, the thousand petaled lotus. It is a major goal of yogic practice to raise the energy of the physical
and subtle bodies through the lowers Chakras and concentrate it in this region. KaNNudaiya VaLLalar ends with
a contemptuous dismissal of such practices, with the words, 'itu enna nilai' - what kind of state is this! In other
words such a state is anything but liberation.

(The further verses of Ozhivil Odukkam will be posted along with the meanings in English, as and when the
future issues of Mountain Path are received.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva..   
       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2015, 06:03:41 PM »
Ozhivil  Odukkam - contd.,  From October - December 2015 issue of Mountain Path:


Verse 105:

The mind is like a caged monkey or the grotesque dance of a shadow puppet. Who could hope to subdue
it, grasping it and bringing it under control? Even if one remains still, free of any objective perception,
it will keep moving by itself, like a whirling rocket that moves under its own impulsion, the balls in a game
of ammanai, or a spinning top.      (105)

The nature of the monkey is extremely active and restless.   However, much more so when it is restrained
in a cage from which it wants to escape?  The image of a monkey kept in a cage is therefore a fitting
image for the attempt to control the mind by restraining it bodily means, such as breath control, and so on,
whose principal effect is to spur the mind into a ever greater activity.  The movements of the mind are
next compared to images in a puppet show consisting of solely of shadows cast against a screen, which
can be observed, but cannot be held or restrained in any way.  A whirling rocket, (the balls in a game of)
ammanai, and a (spinning) top are all given as things which, having been set in motion, continue with a
momentum of their own.  In contrast to the monthly and the shadow puppet, which represent the gross,
outer activity of the mind, these three items represent the mind in its subtle aspect, acting without any
outside stimulus, as and when it is not consciously directed outwards, yet still continues to generate its
own inner activity.  TCS. glosses, like a rocket that whirls round on its own, without anyone holding it
and causing it to move.  The game of ammanai is a girl's game, described in Tamizh Lexicon, as follows:

'Girls' game of keeping a number of balls in the air, some rising while others are falling.'


contd.,

Arunachala Siva.            .         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2015, 03:24:50 PM »
Ozhivil Odukkam -

Verse 106:

It is the habitual nature of the mind to be active even when it is not directed towards any object.
If you try to understand this nature, how will you not be confused?  At the slightest contact with it,
there will be birth and death for you, but if dies,  you will become Sivam.  (106)


The nature of the mind is activity, and it will do anything to prolong and preserve its own existence.
The moment it begins to subside, and we begin to get a sense of the peace. which this might bring,
it springs back into existence, generating numerous thoughts about how, using this very mind, we
might determine the nature of this peace, and make it our permanent state, and so on.  Therefore, the
wise course is to ignore the mind and put one's attention wholly on the Self, Sivam, by dwelling on the
'I' sense.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2015, 06:39:16 PM »
Ozhivil Odukkam:

Verse 107:

Abide simply as pure consciousness.  Then delusion will not arise.  If there is the slightest movement in
consciousness, will not the world of diversity shoot forth like a sky rocket? This state of Samadhi can be
compared to the perfect alignment of the pointers on a pair of scales.  If that state arises, you will be
a king of Jnana. Who will be your equal?

T.C.S. explains the image as follows:  our consciousness is like a pair of scales with stones in one pan
and gold in the others in the other;   the stones are the state of kevalam - unconsciousness and the gold
is chakalam -- the waking state.   The scale has two pointers: the lower pointer is the anma - jiva
or soul, which moves as the arm of the scales moves, and the upper pointer is arul -- Grace which
does not move.  When the two pans are in perfect balance, and the two pointers are therefore perfectly
aligned, this denotes the state of Samadhi, when the consciousness is perfectly aligned with grace, and
in which therefore the delusion of the world and its modifications does not appear.  The word arul is
simply another way of referring to the Self, especially when thought of in its dynamic aspect, as conferring
or facilitating realization. The term chakalam denotes the state in which the Jiva is active, under the influence of tattvas,and kevalam, the state of unconsciousness, as in deep sleep. The state which is being described her is a state of vigilant awareness, in which awareness is neither wandering lost amidst sense objects under
the influence of the mind and senses, nor is it sunk in the blankness of the unconscious state.

"That is the state of a Jnani.  It is neither sleep nor waking but intermediate between the two.  There is the awareness of the waking state and the stillness of sleep.  It is called Jagrat Sushupti.. Go to the root of
thoughts and you reach the stillness of sleep.   But you reach it in the full vigor of search, that is, with perfect
awareness."  (Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi Talk No. 609)

Arunachala Siva.                                 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Ozhivil Odukkam - A third serial post. - 2015 onwards.
« Reply #29 on: October 18, 2015, 04:50:04 PM »
Verse 108 of Ozhuil Odukkam - continues....

Who taught water to be cool,  fire to burn and the air to stir and be agitated? Whoever you are, the mind
and other faculties will not simply go away.  To attempt to remove them is like trying to bury a shadow.
You should see as the heaven see.   Only then they will be eliminated.  (108)

If one heaps earth upon a shadow, the shadow will of course not be buried but will reappear on the top
of the pile.   In a similar way, if we try to use the mind to eliminate the mind, that mental process will
continue to propagate itself ad infinitum.  The heavens, as pure space, possess an infinite capacity for
penetrating all things, yet are not in contact with, or affected by, any of them. In the same way,
we cease to be affected by it, just as the cinema screen is not affected by the images that appear upon it.
Therefore, in the final part of the verse KaNNudaiya VaLLalar enjoins us to 'see as the heavens see.'

continued...     

Arunachala Siva.