Author Topic: 『A Search in Secret India』 chapter 8 Need some advices  (Read 1072 times)

shiba

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『A Search in Secret India』 chapter 8 Need some advices
« on: March 05, 2015, 08:23:57 AM »
I am now trying to translate chapter 8 and 9 of 『A Search in Secret India』 into Japanease. I find some sentences difficult to translate...  :-\ I need some advices.

The below bold sentence of chapter 8 is difficult to understand for me. I am very glad if forum members give me some advices to it :).

"About the time of tiffin, that is, tea and biscuits, the servant announces a visitor. The latter proves to be a fellow member of the ink-stained fraternity, to wit, the writer Venkataramani.

Several letters of introduction lie where I have thrown them, at the bottom of my trunk. I have no desire to use them. This is in response to a curious whim that it might be better to tempt whatever gods there be to do their best - or worst. However, I used one in Bombay, preparatory to beginning my quest, and I used another in Madras because I have been charged to deliver a personal message with it. And thus, this second note has brought Venkataramani to my door.

He is a member of the Senate of Madras University, but he is better known as the author of talented essays and novels of village life. He is the first Hindu writer in Madras Presidency, who uses the medium of English, to be publicly presented with an inscribed ivory shield because of his services to literature. He writes in a delicate style of such merit as to win high commendation from Rabindranath Tagore in India and from the late Lord Haldane in England. His prose is piled with beautiful metaphors, but his stories tell of the melancholy life of neglected villages."

shiba

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Re: 『A Search in Secret India』 chapter 8 Need some advices
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2015, 12:35:25 PM »
Fortunately I maybe come to understand the meaning of the sentence ;D.

It may means that Paul Brunton liked to "leave the course of events in the lap of gods" rather than to use letters of introduction. It was the curious whim of Paul Brunton . And I like his way ;).