Author Topic: Why I am Happy?  (Read 1420 times)

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Why I am Happy?
« on: February 03, 2015, 10:21:22 AM »
This article appeared in Mountain Path, October- December 2014 issue.The author is I.S. Madugula.

*

'...to be happy is natural; all else is unnatural...(Talks No. 633)

*

Happiness is my birthright and nobody is going to take it away from me.

I have no use for happiness engineers, happiness consultants, chief fun officers, or 'fungineering'  departments that
are becoming popular in big business.  You cannot mandate happiness or force someone to smile.

John Stuart Mill's "paradox of hedonism" says, 'Ask yourself if you are happy and you cease to be so.'  So I am not asking
myself if I am happy;  instead, I am analyzing why I am happy, as any rational person might be curious to do as he sees
so much unhappiness around the world.

The ability to be happy is inherent in all of us.  The Dalai Lama says,'The purpose of our lives is to be happy. Referring to
to the easy accessibility of happiness, Einstein says, 'A table, a chair, a bowl of fruit and a violin; what else a man need
to be happy?' He means that, since happiness resides within us all the time, why look for it on the outside in all kinds
of possessions?  Even a basic setup is enough.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Why I am Happy?
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2015, 09:20:13 AM »
What is True Happiness?

Apte's English Sanskrit dictionary translates happiness as ananda, and santhosha among other things. Both these terms
are very significant for the deeper import. Ananda implies bliss that is Brahman, and santosha means 'contentment' which
Patanjali says leads to extraordinary happiness.(Yoga Sutra II. 42).

Now check out what Bhagavan Ramana Maharshi says:  on the very first page of Talks the topic is discussed.(Talks No.3)

If a man thinks that his happiness is due to external things with increase of possessions and diminish in proportion to
their dimunition....

In deep sleep the man is devoid of possessions, including his own body.  Instead of being unhappy he is quite happy.
Everyone desires to sleep soundly.  The conclusion is that happiness is inherent in man and is not due to the external
causes. One must realize his Self in order to open the store of his unalloyed happiness.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
   

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Why I am Happy?
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2015, 04:45:57 PM »
Happiness as we know it.

It is not hard to find out what makes us happy on a daily basis. Most of the time, it is simple pleasures of life  that makes
us  happy. For instance , a dyed in  wool Hyderabadi will be immensely pleased if he get an order of mirchchi bajjis when
he is starving. An automobile buff like me would be happy to get behind the wheel of the $ 200,000 2014 Mercedes Benz
sedan just for a short spin.  A petty thief working the streets can feel he is on cloud nine if he can pick up a bus
rider's pocket for a couple 100 rupee notes. A little kid  is elated when someone give him a  piece of candy.

In abstract terms, happiness is the state of mind that we  experience when,

- when we obtain the object of desires. The more we obtain,the more happy we tend to be;

- we have pleasant experience of some sort. ;

- when we visit an exciting new place;

- we achieve fame and fortune.;

- our physical needs are satisfied.

and so on.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva, 

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Why I am Happy?
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2015, 04:12:01 PM »
On second thoughts:

But re-read the above to comprehend what we are really saying.What is the highest common factor of these statements?
How long is each of those  kinds of happiness likely to last?

The answer is that each of these happiness lasts only as long the experience that triggers  it lasts. And there will be breaks
in our happiness whenever  there is break in the experience.

Therefore it is clear that  happiness of this kind is every ephemeral and shaky at best. Is this kind of happiness we want
for which bust our chops all our lives? Does it make sense to do so?

Obviously,most people are content with this kind of temporary happiness. But equally obvious question as we have been
indicating is:  Will they be happy once those triggers are absent? Will they remain contented  once the toys are taken
away from them and adversity overtakes them in some form or other?

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Why I am Happy?
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2015, 08:53:48 AM »
So What is the way out?

We asked above what is the highest common factor of the different kinds of happiness we experience during the course
of our ordinary lives.  The answer is what we think we are happy or unhappy based on external circumstances and events.
Once we use the word 'think', our mind comes into the picture. In other words, the recipient of all the information at
the basic level is our mind, which is a material faculty.  Then the functioning of the mind is witnessed by the inner I, the
Spirit,which is present through all different kinds of experiences and states of mind and through the three states of
consciousness.

That being the case, the remedy for our ultimate dissatisfaction, with temporary moods of joy is to eliminate the moods
altogether from the happiness equation.  Eliminating moods implies the suspension of the mind where moods arise.
That is a good beginning. But even total elimination of mood swings involves the total annihilation of the mind, so
moods will never arise thereafter.  When the mind is shut down and its functioning is scorched at will, what remains
is the I, the witness, which has no interest in status, pomp, or circumstances. It just remains a bystander, ever happy,
ever contented, ever blissful because it has no desire to possess or enjoy anything that the mind along with the senses,
throws at it. That is after all the definition of I, the unalloyed happiness that Bhagavan speaks of above, and the Ananda,
the Bliss that the Veda extols as Brahman.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Why I am Happy?
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2015, 07:45:28 AM »
In this process moral laws and ethical commandments help us by banishing desire in the first place, Patanjali has a trick
to deal with deviant thoughts.  If immoral thoughts rise in your mind, as you practice the yamas and niyamas, counter
them with the opposite thoughts to cancel them out. It works better as your practice intensifies, according to yoga
(Yoga Sutra II. 33).  This is well and good initially, but how do we get rid of the mind totally, when it interferes with
our I-focus?

What to do when you don't know what to do?

The answer is simple, direct, and effective. Nothing!  Bhagavan's favorite instruction to His questioners:  'Doing nothing
implies thinking nothing and training the mind to be still and eventually to get lost. A still mind, that fosters self awareness
leads one to their primordial state of being which, of  course, is happiness.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Why I am Happy?
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2015, 12:19:10 PM »
Bhagavan explains not only the metaphysics of happiness but also the mechanics of unhappiness. (Talks No. 28).

Ego's perfection is suddenly broken at a point  and want is felt giving rise to a desire, to get something or do something.
When that is cured by the fulfillment of that desire, the ego is happy and the original perfection is restored.  Therefore
happiness may be said to be our natural condition or nature.  Pleasure and pain are relative and refer to our finite state,
with progress by satisfaction of want. If relative progress is stopped and the soul merges into Brahman- of the  nature of
perfect peace--that soul ceases to have relative, temporary pleasure and enjoys perfect peace -- Bliss. Hence Self Realization
is Bliss. It is realizing the Self as the limitless spiritual eye (Jnana drishti) and not clairvoyance.  It is the highest self surrender.
Samsara (the world cycle) is sorrow.

So eliminate unhappiness in the above manner and what remains is pure happiness, which can only be experienced and not
described.  Since we are all God's children at the very least, if not part and parcel of the Godhead, His DNA is in us leaving
no room for unhappiness.

Let me leave you with this definition  of happiness, one that works for me; happy you are, if you know so.
(Italian writer Luigi Pirandello, who wrote the famous play Right You Are If You Think So.)

concluded.

Arunachala Siva.