Author Topic: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda  (Read 20508 times)

Nagaraj

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Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« on: August 03, 2014, 10:31:55 AM »




We believe not only in universal toleration, but we accept all religions as true. I am proud to belong to a nation which has sheltered the persecuted and the refugees of all religions and all nations of the earth. I am proud to tell you that we have gathered in our bosom the purest remnant of the Israelites, who came to Southern India and took refuge with us in the very year in which their holy temple was shattered to pieces by Roman tyranny. I am proud to belong to the religion which has sheltered and is still fostering the remnant of the grand Zoroastrian nation. I will quote to you, brethren, a few lines from a hymn which I remember to have repeated from my earliest boyhood, which is every day repeated by millions of human beings:

As the different streams having their sources in different places all mingle their water in the sea, so, O Lord, the different paths which men take through different tendencies, various though they appear, crooked or straight, all lead to Thee.

           
« Last Edit: August 03, 2014, 10:38:55 AM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2014, 10:38:23 AM »
The present convention, which is one of the most august assemblies ever held,
is in itself a vindication, a declaration to the world of the wonderful doctrine
preached in the Gita:

Whosoever comes to Me, through whatsoever form,
I reach him; all men are struggling through paths
which in the end lead to me.
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Jewell

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2014, 05:54:59 PM »
Thank You so much,dear Sri Nagaraj,for opening this topic and made me remember our wonderful Swami! Just seeing His picture or reading His words,and my heart is dancing.

How beautiful and gentle Soul He was!!!

With love and prayers,

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2014, 09:53:05 AM »
Dear Sri Jewel,

yes, Swami is an epitome of unparalleled compassion. some time back i happened to read this from somewhere:

Swami Vivekananda and his compassion
Year 1902, Place: Belur Math

Swami Vivekananda was staying in the Math. Some Santhal laborers used to work in the Math. They were poor, uneducated and simple. Swamiji had great sympathy, bordering on love, for these laborers who, despite honest and hard labor, could not feed their family adequately. The compassionate heart of Swami Vivekananda would grieve and melt for these poor fellows. He would inquire about their family, say simple jokes, and mix with these 'lowly fellows'. The spiritual personality of Swamiji would see suffering Narayana in them. His heart would get filled with unparalleled pity, compassion, and kindness towards these Santhal workers.

Like Gopis of Vraja, who would protest to Krishna not to play the sweet music on his flute, for it attracted them to Him and His Raas Lila with such great intensity that they used to forget their homes and husbands, these workers would also protest: "O my Swamiji, do not come to us when we are working, for while talking to you our work stops and the supervising swami rebukes us afterwards." With such intensity of love, Swami Vivekananda would attract these poor laborers.

One day Swamiji had a desire to feed these workers. Accordingly, he made arrangements for their lunch. At his orders, bread, curry, sweets, and curds etc. were arranged for the Santhals. Sitting before the Swami, all of them relished the sumptuous food. One Keshta said: "O Swami, whence have you got such a thing! We never tasted anything like this." Feeding them to their heart's content, Swami Vivekananda said, "You are Narayana, God manifest; today I have offered food to Narayana."

Turning to the disciple, the Swami said: "I found them the veritable embodiment of God - such simplicity, such sincere guileless love I have seen nowhere else." And later addressing the sannyasins of the Math, Swami Vivekananda had said: "Can you mitigate their misery a little! Otherwise, of what good is the wearing of the Gerrua (ochre) robe? Sacrifice of everything for the good of others is real sannyasa..." "Seeing the poor people of our country starving for food, a desire comes to my mind to overthrow all ceremonial worship and learning, and go around from place to place to serve these poor and afflicted..."

Such love for suffering humanity had come to the heart of Swami Vivekananda from the teachings of his Master, Sri Ramakrishna. Seeing God everywhere, and in particular His most dramatic and full expression in human beings was the main emphasis of the teaching of New Vedanta as propagated by Sri Ramakrishna. Innumerable examples can be cited to highlight this point. For instance, Sri Ramakrishna once remarked, 'I wondered why should be God meditated upon only with eyes closed, He should be seen all around us in all human beings even with eyes wide open!'

One more touching incidence is worth recounting from the life of Swami Vivekananda. Once the Swami was delivering a talk on Vedas to the sannyasins of the Math. The whole country was in the grip of famine; people were suffering and even dying of hunger. Girish Chandra Gosh, a close associate of Swami Vivekananda and devotee of Sri Ramakrishna was listening to the erudite talk, but felt that such a talk was useless and misplaced, for it did not help mitigate the pangs of hunger of millions. Hence, intervening, Girish said, 'Swamiji, would this talk bring peace and solace to the suffering humanity? Can Vedanta and Vedas bring food to the hungry mouths? How I feel for them, what should I do! What can I do?'

Listening to the fervent appeal full of pathos and sincere feeling, the broad and tender heart of Swami Vivekananda melted, and tears rolled down his cheek. Not to embarrass the sannyasins, Swami Vivekananda rushed away to his chamber in great distress. Turning to the group of sannyasins, Girish Babu said, "See, how compassionate your swami is; we householders do not much understand Vedas and Upanishads, but we see genuine love for humanity in Swami Vivekananda and hence love him and his sangha."

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Jewell

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2014, 06:12:39 PM »
Dear Sri Nagaraj,

How beautiful and touching story! How loving and kind,how wise and strong He was,so charismatic,one extraordinary Soul. Embodiment of Love and Might. And how powerful His words are. Like a lions roar,like a thunder.
I simply adore Him! And i can see why Sri Ramakrishna loved Him so much. It is not possible not to love Him. And how much He still inspires us...

Inspired by Your post,i found this in Swami's Collected works. Beautiful words which describe Him best.


   One infinite pure and holy
beyond thought beyond qualities
I bow down
to Thee.

 Thou art the only treasure in this world!

Thou art the Father
the Lord,the Mother
the Husband and Love!   
« Last Edit: August 05, 2014, 06:16:12 PM by Jewell »

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2014, 11:56:53 AM »
WHY WE DISAGREE

15th September, 1893

I will tell you a little story. You have heard the eloquent speaker who has just finished say, "Let us cease from abusing each other," and he was very sorry that there should be always so much variance.

But I think I should tell you a story which would illustrate the cause of this variance. A frog lived in a well. It had lived there for a long time. It was born there and brought up there, and yet was a little, small frog. Of course the evolutionists were not there then to tell us whether the frog lost its eyes or not, but, for our story's sake, we must take it for granted that it had its eyes, and that it every day cleansed the water of all the worms and bacilli that lived in it with an energy that would do credit to our modern bacteriologists. In this way it went on and became a little sleek and fat. Well, one day another frog that lived in the sea came and fell into the well.

"Where are you from?"

"I am from the sea."

"The sea! How big is that? Is it as big as my well?" and he took a leap from one side of the well to the other.

"My friend," said the frog of the sea, "how do you compare the sea with your little well??

Then the frog took another leap and asked, "Is your sea so big?"

"What nonsense you speak, to compare the sea with your well!"

"Well, then," said the frog of the well, "nothing can be bigger than my well; there can be nothing bigger than this; this fellow is a liar, so turn him out."

That has been the difficulty all the while.

I am a Hindu. I am sitting in my own little well and thinking that the whole world is my little well. The Christian sits in his little well and thinks the whole world is his well. The Mohammedan sits in his little well and thinks that is the whole world. I have to thank you of America for the great attempt you are making to break down the barriers of this little world of ours, and hope that, in the future, the Lord will help you to accomplish your purpose.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2014, 09:51:45 AM »
Here I stand and if I shut my eyes, and try to conceive my existence, "I", "I", "I", what is the idea before me? The idea of a body. Am I, then, nothing but a combination of material substances? The Vedas declare, ?No?. I am a spirit living in a body. I am not the body. The body will die, but I shall not die. Here am I in this body; it will fall, but I shall go on living. I had also a past. The soul was not created, for creation means a combination which means a certain future dissolution. If then the soul was created, it must die.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2014, 09:55:02 AM »
So then the Hindu believes that he is a spirit. Him the sword cannot pierce ? him the fire cannot burn ? him the water cannot melt ? him the air cannot dry. The Hindu believes that every soul is a circle whose circumference is nowhere, but whose centre is located in the body, and that death means the change of this centre from body to body. Nor is the soul bound by the conditions of matter. In its very essence it is free, unbounded, holy, pure, and perfect. But somehow or other it finds itself tied down to matter, and thinks of itself as matter.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2014, 01:46:19 PM »
Why should the free, perfect, and pure being be thus under the thraldom of matter, is the next question. How can the perfect soul be deluded into the belief that it is imperfect? We have been told that the Hindus shirk the question and say that no such question can be there. Some thinkers want to answer it by positing one or more quasi-perfect beings, and use big scientific names to fill up the gap. But naming is not explaining. The question remains the same. How can the perfect become the quasi-perfect; how can the pure, the absolute, change even a microscopic particle of its nature? But the Hindu is sincere. He does not want to take shelter under sophistry. He is brave enough to face the question in a manly fashion; and his answer is: ?I do not know. I do not know how the perfect being, the soul, came to think of itself as imperfect, as joined to and conditioned by matter." But the fact is a fact for all that. It is a fact in everybody's consciousness that one thinks of oneself as the body. The Hindu does not attempt to explain why one thinks one is the body. The answer that it is the will of God is no explanation. This is nothing more than what the Hindu says, "I do not know."

     
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2014, 12:35:34 PM »
He is everywhere, the pure and formless One, the Almighty and the All-merciful. "Thou art our father, Thou art our mother, Thou art our beloved friend, Thou art the source of all strength; give us strength. Thou art He that beareth the burdens of the universe; help me bear the little burden of this life." Thus sang the Rishis of the Vedas. And how to worship Him? Through love. "He is to be worshipped as the one beloved, dearer than everything in this and the next life."

This is the doctrine of love declared in the Vedas, and let us see how it is fully developed and taught by Krishna, whom the Hindus believe to have been God incarnate on earth.

He taught that a man ought to live in this world like a lotus leaf, which grows in water but is never moistened by water; so a man ought to live in the world ? his heart to God and his hands to work.

It is good to love God for hope of reward in this or the next world, but it is better to love God for love's sake, and the prayer goes: "Lord, I do not want wealth, nor children, nor learning. If it be Thy will, I shall go from birth to birth, but grant me this, that I may love Thee without the hope of reward ? love unselfishly for love's sake."


--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2014, 12:36:42 PM »
One of the disciples of Krishna, the then Emperor of India, was driven from his kingdom by his enemies and had to take shelter with his queen in a forest in the Himalayas, and there one day the queen asked him how it was that he, the most virtuous of men, should suffer so much misery. Yudhishthira answered, "Behold, my queen, the Himalayas, how grand and beautiful they are; I love them. They do not give me anything, but my nature is to love the grand, the beautiful, therefore I love them. Similarly, I love the Lord. He is the source of all beauty, of all sublimity. He is the only object to be loved; my nature is to love Him, and therefore I love. I do not pray for anything; I do not ask for anything. Let Him place me wherever He likes. I must love Him for love's sake. I cannot trade in love."

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2014, 12:39:11 PM »
The Vedas teach that the soul is divine, only held in the bondage of matter; perfection will be reached when this bond will burst, and the word they use for it is therefore, Mukti ? freedom, freedom from the bonds of imperfection, freedom from death and misery.

And this bondage can only fall off through the mercy of God, and this mercy comes on the pure. So purity is the condition of His mercy. How does that mercy act? He reveals Himself to the pure heart; the pure and the stainless see God, yea, even in this life; then and then only all the crookedness of the heart is made straight. Then all doubt ceases. He is no more the freak of a terrible law of causation. This is the very centre, the very vital conception of Hinduism. The Hindu does not want to live upon words and theories. If there are existences beyond the ordinary sensuous existence, he wants to come face to face with them. If there is a soul in him which is not matter, if there is an all-merciful universal Soul, he will go to Him direct. He must see Him, and that alone can destroy all doubts. So the best proof a Hindu sage gives about the soul, about God, is: "I have seen the soul; I have seen God." And that is the only condition of perfection. The Hindu religion does not consist in struggles and attempts to believe a certain doctrine or dogma, but in realising ? not in believing, but in being and becoming.


--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2014, 01:16:07 PM »
If it is happiness to enjoy the consciousness of this small body, it must be greater happiness to enjoy the consciousness of two bodies, the measure of happiness increasing with the consciousness of an increasing number of bodies, the aim, the ultimate of happiness being reached when it would become a universal consciousness.

Therefore, to gain this infinite universal individuality, this miserable little prison-individuality must go. Then alone can death cease when I am alone with life, then alone can misery cease when I am one with happiness itself, then alone can all errors cease when I am one with knowledge itself.


--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2014, 01:18:36 PM »
I remember, as a boy, hearing a Christian missionary preach to a crowd in India. Among other sweet things he was telling them was that if he gave a blow to their idol with his stick, what could it do? One of his hearers sharply answered, "If I abuse your God, what can He do?" ?You would be punished,? said the preacher, "when you die." "So my idol will punish you when you die," retorted the Hindu.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Glimpses from Complete works of Swami Vivekananda
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2014, 01:24:44 PM »
Man is to become divine by realising the divine. Idols or temples or churches or books are only the supports, the helps, of his spiritual childhood: but on and on he must progress.

He must not stop anywhere. "External worship, material worship," say the scriptures, "is the lowest stage; struggling to rise high, mental prayer is the next stage, but the highest stage is when the Lord has been realised." Mark, the same earnest man who is kneeling before the idol tells you, "Him the Sun cannot express, nor the moon, nor the stars, the lightning cannot express Him, nor what we speak of as fire; through Him they shine." But he does not abuse any one's idol or call its worship sin. He recognises in it a necessary stage of life. "The child is father of the man." Would it be right for an old man to say that childhood is a sin or youth a sin?

If a man can realise his divine nature with the help of an image, would it be right to call that a sin? Nor even when he has passed that stage, should he call it an error. To the Hindu, man is not travelling from error to truth, but from truth to truth, from lower to higher truth. To him all the religions, from the lowest fetishism to the highest absolutism, mean so many attempts of the human soul to grasp and realise the Infinite, each determined by the conditions of its birth and association, and each of these marks a stage of progress; and every soul is a young eagle soaring higher and higher, gathering more and more strength, till it reaches the Glorious Sun.


--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta