Author Topic: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,  (Read 22534 times)

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #45 on: January 30, 2014, 12:55:30 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
---------------------------------------------

There are stories like this related in the Puranas. But here we see the same thing before our very eyes. When I read out to Bhagavan yesterday's incident about the pigeons, and the worship of the cow, Bhagavan said, "Many similar things often happened here previously. But who was there to record them at that time?" When the first edition of this book (in Telugu) came out and was being read in the presence of Bhagavan, one of the devotees who heard the above story said, addressing him, "it a fact that when you were in Pachiamman Koil somebody got frightened and ran away from an approaching tiger there?" Bhagavan said, "Yes, yes! When I was there, Rangaswami Iyengar used to come off and on. One day, when he went to answer calls of nature it seems he saw a tiger in a bush. When he tried to drive her away by shouting, she replied by a mild roar. His body shook with terror and getting up involuntarily from where he sat, he began running towards me gasping for breath, and shouting at the top of his voice, "Oh, Bhagavan! Ramana! Ramana!" I happened to
come out for some work and so met him. When I asked him what all his fright was about, he said imploringly, "Ayyo, tiger, tiger! Come, Swami, we must go into the temple and close all the doors, otherwise she will come in. Why don't you come?" I said, laughing, "Let us wait and see. Where is the tiger? It is nowhere." Pointing towards the bush he said, "There it is in that bush." I said, "You wait here. I will go and see." When I went there and saw, there was no tiger. Still, he could not shed his fear. I assured him that it was a harmless animal and there was no need to be afraid, but he would not believe me. Another day, while I was sitting on the edge of the tank opposite the temple, that tiger came to drink water, and without any fear, roamed about for a while looking at me, and went its way. Iyengar, however, observed all this, hiding himself in the temple. He was afraid of what might happen to me. After the tiger left, I went into the temple and relieved him of his fear saying, "Look! What a mild animal it is! If we threaten it, it will attack us. Not otherwise." I thus dispelled his fears. We too were not there for long after that,"said Bhagavan.

- Letters from Ramanasramam by Suri Nagamma

Subramanian.R

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #46 on: January 30, 2014, 03:51:30 PM »
The snake and the meditator:

This incident was narrated by Swami Madhavatirtha.  He was a Gujarati devotee of Bhagavan and came to Sri Ramanasramam
in 1944 and stayed there for sometime.  He has written in a Biography of Bhagavan in Gujarati:

There was an incident which I witnessed in Maharshi's Hall.  There was however a devotee who had had a desire to go
and meditate in a cave on the Holy Hill of Arunachala.  Bhagavan gave him permission to go.  The devotee went to the cave,
but many snakes were there.  A little later, while the devotee was sitting in meditation, a snake and hit its hood on his thigh.
The devotee opened his eyes and discovered that the snake had not bitten him.  The snake went away and the devotee
started meditating again.  Later, the snake came back and repeated its strange action.

The devotee thought to himself, 'If this keeps on happening it will not be possible to stay in this cave and meditate. '

He went to see Bhagavan who immediately asked him what had happened.  Bhagavan commented, 'The snake came to you
to say 'You must stay there only'.  If you could have caught the snake by the mouth, he would have said, 'Stay here only.'
God came to test you in the form of a snake.'

After listening to this answer the devotee went back to the cave to meditate the next day also.

(Source: Power of the Presence, David Godman, Part I.)

Arunachala Siva.               

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #47 on: January 31, 2014, 12:03:50 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
--------------------------------------------

One afternoon in 1946, at 2 p.m. some savouries prepared in the Ashram were distributed amongst the devotees. A few of them were given to Bhagavan also. Bhagavan ate them, drank some water, went out and came back, when some monkeys came to the window near his sofa. Seeing them, Bhagavan asked his attendants to go and bring some of the savoury preparations, saying, that the monkeys would relish them very much. The attendants returned saying that the people in the kitchen refused, saying that they had not prepared enough savouries to feed the monkeys also. "Oho! How did we get them then?" said Bhagavan. "This is ration time," said a devotee. "What if it is ration
time? When we have rations, why should they (monkeys) not have rations as well? The problem will be solved if a ration card is obtained for the monkeys as well. They will eat these things with greater relish than we. If they do not have it, why should we have it either? When we are eating, see
how those children (i.e., the monkeys) are looking at us," said Bhagavan. Thereupon, they also got their share. From that time onwards, Bhagavan used to accept things only after the monkeys' share were given to them. It seems there was an earlier practice of taking out their share first before anything was distributed. The change that had come about in the interim period disappeared with this reprimand from Bhagavan. In the past, on festive occasions like Jayanti and Mahapuja, Bhagavan used to see that some food was taken out separately, made into balls, placed in a basket and then
taken into Palakothu where he used to sit and personally hand over the balls one by one with great joy to the monkeys. A photo was taken of this event at the time of Bhagavan's Shashtiabda-purthi festivities in 1939. The radiance on Bhagavan's face at that time can be seen and appreciated if
that photo is looked at.

- Letters from Ramanasramam by Suri Nagamma, 23rd May, 1949

Subramanian.R

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #48 on: January 31, 2014, 12:43:11 PM »
FROG:

Bhagavan used to say, 'A Frog is often compared to a Yogi.  It remains quiet for a long time.  The only sign of life is being
the rhythmic movement of the under-skin below the neck. Giant frogs can remain for extraordinarily long periods with
their animation suspended. They are said to swallow their tongue.  Swallowing the tongue is a Yogic practice.  The animation
is suspended.  The yogi does not die because the tongue is drawn out by someone else before life activity is resumed.  It is
a wonder how the frog brings out the already swallowed tongue and resumes activity.

While in Skandasramam, Sri Bhagavan saw a white toad, small and long at a distance about 10 feet from Him.  Bhagavan
stared at it and it stared back at Him. Suddenly, it took a long jump and lodged itself precisely on the right eye of Bhagavan
who quickly closed it.  The Asramites gasped, fearing harm to His right eye. 

Attendant asked if Bhagavan was alright.  Bhagavan did not answer, though His broad smile and slight chuckle said
something like, 'No need to worry.  He is just saying 'Hello'.

(Source: Talks with Ramana Maharshi, Talks No. 324.
              Hobblers and Monkeys of Arunachala.)

Arunachala Siva.             

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #49 on: January 31, 2014, 04:47:48 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
--------------------------------------------

You know what happened one morning in 1946? Squirrels came on to Bhagavan's sofa for cashew nuts. The nuts, which used to be in the tin near Bhagavan, were exhausted. Groundnuts were given instead. The squirrels would not eat them and began to express their discontent in
all possible ways. "We don't have them, my dears. What to do?" said Bhagavan, as he tried to cajole them. No. They would not be appeased. They were crawling over the legs and hands of Bhagavan continuously as a sign of their displeasure. So Bhagavan asked Krishnaswami to go and find out if there was any stock of cashew nuts in the storeroom. Krishnaswami went and brought a few nuts. "Is that all?" asked Bhagavan. Krishnaswami said that they were preparing payasam that night and so they could spare only that much. Bhagavan felt annoyed and said, " I see. Payasam will not be less tasteful if the cashew nuts are a little less in quantity than usual. What a pity. These squirrels do not like anything less and they are worrying me. The storekeepers have declined to give cashew nuts saying that they will have to put them into the payasam. Who will be worried if there are no cashew nuts in the payasam? See how these children are worrying themselves for want of cashew nuts!" With that, the cashew nuts which should have gone into payasam, went into the stomachs of the squirrels and also into the tin by his side (for future feeding of the squirrels). The same evening, Dr. Anantanarayana Rao brought
from Madras two visa (about 4.5 kilograms) of cashew nuts, saying that he had brought them for the squirrels. With a smile, Bhagavan said addressing Krishnaswami, "Look at this. They are earning whatever they want. There is no need to beg of you. These cashew nuts are their property. Keep them carefully. Note that they should not be given to the storeroom. Take care."


- Letters from Ramanasramam by Suri Nagamma

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #50 on: February 03, 2014, 02:10:38 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
--------------------------------------------

One morning in January 1947, at about 9 a.m., Lakshmi the cow entered the hall hurriedly with her legs, body and tail full of mud, with blood oozing out of her nose and with a half-severed rope round her neck. She went straight to the sofa where Bhagavan sat. The attendants began saying with
some disgust that she had come in with mud on her body. Bhagavan, however, said with affection, "Let her come. Let her come. What does it matter how she comes?" Addressing the cow, he said. "Come, my dear. Please come near." So saying he passed his hand over the body lightly, patted her
on the neck and looking at the face and said, "What is this? Some blood is oozing!" One of the attendants said, "Recently they had put a rope through her nose." "Oho! Is that the reason? That is why she has come here to complain to me about it. Is it not very painful for her? Unable to bear the pain, she has come here running to complain to me without even washing her body. What to do? Give her some iddli or something," said Bhagavan, evincing great solicitude for her welfare. The attendants gave her some plantains and thus managed to send her out. I went to the kitchen, brought some iddlies and gave them to her. She was satisfied and went away to her usual place.
After all of us returned to the hall and sat down, Bhagavan remarked, looking at the attendants, "Do not all of you come to me to relate your troubles? She too has done the same thing. Why then are you vexed with her for coming here with mud on her? When we have troubles, do we consider whether our clothes are all right or our hair is properly brushed?"

- Letters from Ramanasramam, Suri Nagamma

Subramanian.R

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #51 on: February 03, 2014, 02:54:44 PM »
Protection for Squirrel:

One early morning, in April 1942, when Bhagavan was  returning from His walk, on the Hill, after breakfast, He had a
nasty accident.  One of His favorite squirrels ran across His path as he was descending from the stone steps near the Asramam
dispensary.  The squirrel was chased by the Asramam dog that was in full pursuit.  Bhagavan immediately pursued forward.
He put His stick in front of the dog to stop it and to protect the squirrel. The squirrel escaped and ran away as the dog was
distracted.  But Bhagavan lost His balance, slipped and fell down the steps which caused a lot of pain.  He had broken His
collar bone.  Bhagavan did not care for His own safety while protecting the devotee.  It may just be a squirrel, but for Him
the primary concern was to protect His friend, the squirrel.  His own safety was secondary.

(Source: Sadhu's Reminiscences, Major Chadwick.)           

Arunachala Siva.

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #52 on: February 04, 2014, 01:20:54 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
---------------------------------------------

There is no need to mention the love and affection Bhagavan has towards the peacocks. Not only is he specially considerate towards mild animals like these, he is equally considerate towards beings like snakes which are also given shelter in the Ashram. Not only is this mentioned in his biography but we ourselves have now and then witnessed it here. I have already written to you earlier about the tiger cubs. Recently an incident happened here about snakes. As the opening ceremony of the Patala Linga Temple was fixed for the 4th and as several visitors were expected at the Ashram on that account, and especially the Governor and his wife, it was felt that the available space would not be sufficient and so a pandal was put up to the right side of Bhagavan's sofa in the Jubilee Hall to accommodate them. A week earlier, i.e., towards the end of April, Krishnaswami arranged that the pandal should be used for Veda Parayana and also for the ladies to sit under. It is after all a new
construction. On all its sides crotons were placed, khus-khus thatties were tied and water was sprinkled regularly. Hence the place remained comparatively cool. Some four days after the pandal was erected I happened to go there in the afternoon a little earlier than usual. Bhagavan had just gone out and come back. There was nobody near him. I prostrated before him and then sat down under the pandal. A big green snake came through an opening between the crotons on the side of
Bhagavan's sofa, glided along some distance, got up on to the roof of the pandal and settled down comfortably there. I was not frightened in any way and so kept quiet looking at the snake and at Bhagavan. He noticed my feelings and said with a smile, "He has come here because it is cool." I said, "Since how long could he have been here?" Bhagavan replied, "He came here about the same time as I returned after the midday meal. He has been going around the pandal and also the
crotons. He has been coming here like this for the last three days and going away around 2.30 p.m."
I said, "He must be a great soul. He must have come here in this shape to serve Bhagavan when he is alone." As I was saying this, Krishnaswami came in. Krishnaswami: "I do not know what to do. He is coming here every day. Bhagavan says we should not chase him away." Bhagavan: "What if he comes? What harm has he done to us?" Krishnaswami: "He has not done anything to us. But
this is a place to which several people come. Is it not risky?" Bhagavan: "But he goes away at 2.30 p.m., doesn't he?" Krishnaswami: "It is all right now, but during festival days people come in at all times." Bhagavan: "Oho! That is your fear!" So saying, Bhagavan looked at the snake and at me. I too began looking at the snake and at Bhagavan, and I said, "He must have come here to serve Bhagavan. But if he comes with this cover (meaning the body), there is likely to be some trouble to him from the people in general and from him to the general public." Bhagavan: "It might be so."
Bhagavan thereupon looked at the snake for a while, steadfastly and graciously. Immediately after that the snake, which was remaining still all the time we were discussing, got down the pandal rapidly, went into the flower garden and disappeared. There was no knowing what message he
received when Bhagavan gazed at him. The clock struck the half-hour. Devotees began coming in rows and prostrated before Bhagavan. Bhagavan's look thus got diverted and he came back to his normal state. The snake was never seen afterwards. There are ever so many incidents to show that Bhagavan's abode is a place of safe resort not only for the weaker sex and the poor but also for dumb animals at all times.


- Letters from Ramanasramam, Suri Nagamma

Subramanian.R

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #53 on: February 04, 2014, 01:35:33 PM »
Punishment for the wrong deed (Squirrel):

Once, a mischievous and overactive squirrel bit Bhagavan's finger.  This particular squirrel would not take his nuts from the
tin but would insist on Bhagavan feeding him. 

One day, it so happened that when He came for food, Bhagavan was reading or otherwise occupied.  So there was a slight
delay in giving him food.  Perhaps because of his anger, at the delay, he abruptly bit Bhagavan's finger, but Bhagavan still
did not offer him food.  Bhagavan was amused and said,  'You are a naughty creature! You have bitten my finger!  I will no
longer feed you.  Go away!'  Saying so, He stopped feeding the squirrel for a few days.  That was how Bhagavan punished
the squirrel for his impatience and naughtiness.

A regular tussle then followed between Bhagavan and the squirrel.  The squirrel did not stay quiet.  He began begging
Bhagavan for forgiveness by crawling hither and thither.  Bhagavan put the nuts on the window sill and on sofa and told
him to help himself.  But he would not even touch them.  Bhagavan pretended to be indifferent and not to notice.  But
the squirrel would crawl up to Bhagavan's leg, jump on his body, climb on the shoulders and do ever so many things, to attract
His attention.  Bhagavan turned to His devotees and said, 'Look!  This fellow is begging me to forgive him for his mischief
in biting my finger and to give up my refusal to feed him with my own hands.'

Bhagavan pushed the squirrel away for some days saying, 'Naughty creature! Why did you bite my finger?  I won't feed
you now.  That is your punishment.  Look, the nuts are here. Eat them all.'

But, the squirrel would not leave its obstinacy either.  Some days passed.  And Bhagavan who is always kind and merciful
to His devotees, had to admit His defeat, and He fed the squirrel with His own hands.

Suri Nagamma said, 'It occurred to me that it was through perseverance that devotees attained salvation.'

(Source: Letters from Sri Ramanasramam, Suri Nagamma,  03.01.1946)

Arunachala Siva.   
   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #54 on: February 05, 2014, 10:30:10 AM »
Samadhi of Baby Squirrels:

Once when Nagamma was talking to Bhagavan, about squirrels, Bhagavan remarked about the baby squirrels:
He narrated:

There is a big story about the squirrels.  Sometime back they used to have a nest near and above me.  They had
children, grand children, and thus members of their family grew very large. 

The babies and the adults used to play about on this sofa in whatever way they liked.  When I went out for my usual
walk, some little squirrels used to hide under my pillows and when on my return, I reclined on my pillow, they used to
get crushed.  We could not bear the sight of this, and so Madhava drove the squirrels out of the nest and sealed it by
nailing some wooden board over it.  There are lots of incidents about them if one cared to write about them.

As Bhagavan was narrating this, His voice choked.

(Source: Letters from Sri Ramanasramam, dated. 03.01.1946).

Arunachala Siva.     

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #55 on: February 05, 2014, 01:53:01 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
---------------------------------------------

LOVE OF ANIMALS
26th August, 1948

At 3 o'clock this afternoon while we were discussing something in Bhagavan's presence, a stranger came to the Ashram with a platter full of fruits. It seems that on the way to the hall some monkey came, snatched some of the fruits and escaped. Hearing the noise outside and realising what
had happened, Bhagavan laughingly said that the monkey took away its portion of the fruit as it was afraid we would not otherwise give it. We all laughed. While this was going on, a female monkey with a babe at her breast approached the fruit basket. People near the basket shouted it away. Bhagavan said, "It is a mother with a child. Why not give her something and send her away?" But he was not sufficiently audible, and so the monkey got frightened, went off and hid herself in a tree.
Bhagavan, full of pity and kindness, said, "Is this fair? We call ourselves sannyasins; but when a real sannyasi comes we drive him away without giving him anything. How unfair! We want to eat for years and live. We store things in a room, lock it and keep the keys with us. Has the monkey got a house? Can it put anything by for the morrow? It eats whatever it can get and sleeps on whatever
tree available. It carries the child under its belly, wherever it goes, until the child is able to walk about, when it leaves the child to itself. Who is a real sannyasi, the monkey or ourselves? That is why the male monkey took its share on the way itself. That was a male and could do it with impunity. This is a female. What can she do?" So saying Bhagavan began calling that monkey cajolingly. The
monkey came on to the side of the couch and stood there. In an endearing manner, Bhagavan gave her all the fruit she wanted and sent her away.

- Letters from Sri Ramanasramam, Suri Nagamma

Subramanian.R

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #56 on: February 06, 2014, 12:30:04 PM »
The Lucky Ones:

This was an incident witnessed by Chhaganlal V. Yogi in Bhagavan's Hall:


For most of the day,  Bhagavan used to sit on His sofa, which was adjacent to the window.  Squirrels would occasionally
come in through the window and run around near Him.  Bhagavan would respond to them by feeding them cashew and
other food stuffs with His own hands, lovingly.

One day when Bhagavan was feeding the squirrels, a Muslim devotee, who had been watching Him, gave Him a note in
which was written:

'The squirrels are very fortunate because they are getting the food from your own hands.  Your Grace is so much on them.
We feel jealous of the squirrels and feel that we also should have been born as squirrels. Then it would have been very good
for us.'

Bhagavan could not help laughing when He read this note.

He told the man, 'How do you know that the Grace is not there on you also?'

And then, to illustrate His point, Bhagavan told a story:

A thief went to a saint to get his blessings so that his attempt in the robbery that night would be successful.  But that
night the thief was unsuccessful in robbery.  Because of his failure, the thief was very angry with the saint for giving him
false blessings.  The saint said:  'To be unsuccessful in bad work means that the blessings have indeed borne fruit.  There
are so many honest ways of  feeding the stomach.  You should accept any one of them.  To come to this conclusion, it
was necessary that you be unsuccessful in thieving job.' 

The thief understood and became an honest and good man.

Having narrated the story Bhagavan asked the devotee, 'Do you mean to say that only if everything goes according to
your desire, it is possible to say that the Grace of a saint has worked?'

'I don't understand', replied the devotee.

Bhagavan explained in more detail: The blessings of a saint perform the purificatory work of life.  The blessings cannot
increase the impurity.  One whose understanding is limited, will ask for blessings so that he can fulfill certain desires,
but if the desires are such that their fulfillment will make the seeker more impure rather than purer, the saint's blessings
will not enable him to fulfill the desires. In this way, the seeker is saved from further impurities.  In that case, are not a saint's
blessings a gift of compassion?

The devotee finally understood and was satisfied by Bhagavan's words.

(Source: The Power of the Presence, Volume II.)

Arunachala Siva.           

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #57 on: February 06, 2014, 01:18:21 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
--------------------------------------------

Deliverance of a Thorn Bush

One of the devotees who had heard of the verses written by Bhagavan about the deliverance of Lakshmi, the cow, approached Him and said, "Swami, we ourselves see that animals and birds are getting deliverance in your presence, but is it not true that only human beings can get moksha?"

"Why? it is stated that a great saint gave moksha to a thorn bush," said Bhagavan with a smile. The devotee eagerly asked who that great saint was and what was the story about the thorn bush.

IN CHIDAMBARAM, THERE was a jnani by the name of Umapathi Sivacharya. He was a poet and also a pandit. As he was in a transcendental state of spirituality (athita sthithi), he did not pay much attention to the usual brahminical practices. Hence, the dikshitars of the place became angry with him, especially since he was a learned man and knew all the precepts of the Hindu religion. They forbade him from living in the village or even visiting the temple. He therefore lived in a small hut built on a raised ground outside the village. A low caste man called Pethan Samban used to supply him with all that he required and also helped him in a general way. As things went on like this, one day,
when Pethan was carrying on his head a bundle of firewood to the hut, Iswara Himself met him on the way in the guise of the dikshitar in charge of the temple. He wrote a verse on a palmyra leaf and gave it to him, telling him that it was to be handed over to Umapathi Sivacharya, and then disappeared.

Pethan gave that verse to Sivacharya, who, on opening it, found in the first line itself the words, “Adiyarkkadiyen Chitrambalavanan” (the servant of the devotees, the Lord of Chidambaram). Immediately, he was overwhelmed with devotion and a thrill passed through his body as he read the
letter. The gist of the verse was, “A note from Chidambaranathan, the servant of the devotees, to the person who has set up a new establishment, namely Sivacharya. It is your duty to give initiation to this Pethan Samban regardless of caste and to the surprise of all people.” He read the letter and was overwhelmed with joy. In obedience to the orders of the Lord, he initiated Pethan into the order of sannyasa, though he belonged to the lowest caste. In due course he gave nayana diksha (transmission of Power through the eyes) to Pethan, immediately after which Pethan merged into holy light. Sivacharya himself was immensely surprised at this occurrence and only then understood the
wisdom of Pethan. Enemies of Sivacharya noticed the sacrificial offerings and other things he had for this initiation. They complained to the king that Sivacharya had burnt Pethan to death for some mistake, he might have committed. When the king came there with his retinue to enquire into the complaint, Sivacharya showed the verse of Lord Nataraja and said that he gave initiation to Pethan
and that Pethan vanished thereafter in the form of a divine light (jyoti). The king was surprised and asked Sivacharya if he could likewise give initiation and moksha to the thorn bush nearby. “Yes. What doubt, is there?” said Sivacharya. Accordingly he gave nayana diksha to that thorn bush and that too
immediately disappeared in pure light (jyoti). The king was still more astonished at that and said, “This
looks like some black magic. You said this note had been written by Lord Nataraja. Let us go and ask Him.” Sivacharya pointed out that there was a ban on his entering the temple. The king said that would not matter as he himself was accompanying Sivacharya. Accordingly they started for the
temple together. Hearing all this, all the people – the pundits, the common people curious about the whole thing and enemies of Sivacharya who were sure he would be duly punished – flocked to the temple to see the strange sight. The two entered the temple. Out of regard for the king, when
Arathi (waving of lights) was offered to Lord Nataraja, it was found that on either side of the Lord there stood Pethan and the thorn bush. The pundits were surprised and out of fear and remorse, fell at the feet of Sivacharya requesting him to pardon them for all their faults. They subsequently brought
him back into the village with due honours.

- Spiritual Stories as told by Sri Ramana Maharshi

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #58 on: February 07, 2014, 01:26:09 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
--------------------------------------------

The Mongoose

Mr. Grant Duff asked the Master if any mongoose had had anything to do with him. The Master said, “Yes. It was the occasion of Ardra and Jayanti, I was living up the hill in Skandasramam. Streams of visitors were climbing up the hill from the town A mongoose, larger than the ordinary size, of golden hue (not grey as a mongoose is), with no black spot on its tail as is usual with the wild mongoose, passed these crowds fearlessly. People took it to be a tame one belonging to someone in the crowd. The animal went straight to Palaniswami, who was having a bath in the spring by the Virupaksha Cave. He stroked the creature and patted it. It followed him into the cave, inspected every nook and corner and left the place and joined the crowd to pass up to Skandasramam. I noticed it. Everyone was struck
by its attractive appearance and its fearless movements. It came up to me, got on my lap and rested there some time. Then it raised itself up, looked about and moved down; it went round the whole place and I followed it lest it should be harmed by the unwary visitors or by the peacocks. Two peacocks of the place looked at it inquisitively, whereas the mongoose moved nonchalantly from place to place and finally disappeared into the rocks on the south-east of the Asramam.”

- Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi, Talk 84

Subramanian.R

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #59 on: February 07, 2014, 01:30:22 PM »
Reminiscences:

1) Mr. N. Ponnaiah, who lived in Malaysia, visited Bhagavan in 1948.  He has written his reminiscences in the book
'Face to Face with Ramana Maharshi':

In Bhagavan's Hall, the darshan was not the monopoly of humans.  At certain hours squirrels from a large tree, by
the side of the Hall, came down to claim their fair share.  The beautiful peacock followed.  Bhagavan looked at them
most graciously. 'Oh you are hungry!' He would say, and give them some nuts and grains.  They would then move away
happily like a child after being fed by its mother!

2). Mr. K. Subramanian, founder of Hyderabad Ramana Kendra, reminisces that when he was in college, he used to write
letters to Bhagavan and used to go and have darshan of Bhagavan.  He once wrote: 'Sometimes a squirrel would scramble
up the couch.  Bhagavan would fondle it and give it whatever is available and the squirrels would leave without disturbing
anybody.  Similarly a peacock would come and get some puffed rice from Bhagavan's hands. (Face to Face with Sri
Ramana Maharshi.)

3. This incident is narrated by Narayana Iyer:

It was 8.30 one night, when I came to the Asramam.  When Chinnaswamy saw me enter, he said, 'Narayana Iyer, don't
go near Bhagavan's couch.  He had a fracture of His collar bone.  A plaster has been put on it.  He should not be disturbed.
Prostrate at a distance and come away.'

I was shocked to hear the news, but was eager to see Bhagavan. I went on tiptoe and prostrated quietly.  Bhagavan saw
me and said, 'Narayana Iyer, come. Sit by my side on the couch. Only then I can talk to you.' Implicitly, I obeyed Bhagavan
in spite of Chinnaswamy's warning.

Bhagavan said: I was going up the steps.  A dog was chasing a squirrel.  I barred its way by placing my walking stick in
front of it.  The stick slipped and I fell down and got hurt on the collar bone.  They say it is a fracture and native bone setter
of the village, an old devotee was sent for.  He has put this bandage with some green leaves and black gram paste and I am
enjoined not to move lest it be disturbed. 

Bhagavan narrated the incident as though it was some one else's body that was injured and suffering. 

(Surpassing Love and Grace, Sri Ramanasramam).

4. In Talks with Ramana Maharshi, Munagala Venkataramiah writes, (Talks # 229):

At 8 am. the pet squirrel was watching for an opportunity to run out.  Bhagavan remarked: 'All wish to rush out.  There
is no limit to going out.  Happiness lies within not without.'

***

Arunachala Siva.