Author Topic: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,  (Read 24547 times)

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #105 on: March 25, 2016, 07:20:21 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
------------------------------------
In the afternoon he (Mr. W. Y. Evans-Wentz, an English research scholar of Oxford University) began to ask a few questions. They related to Yoga. He wanted to know if it was right to kill animals such as tigers, deer, etc., and use the skin for Yoga posture (asana).

M.: The mind is the tiger or the deer.

D.: If everything be illusion, then one can take lives?

M.: To whom is illusion? Find that out! In fact everyone is a "killer of the Self" (atmahan) every moment of his life.

(From 'Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi': 17)

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #106 on: March 26, 2016, 09:04:45 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

As stated in the Vedas, self-realized seers like Ramana Maharshi are the very embodiment of the Supreme Reality. They are not born to seek liberation. They are prompted by God to impart knowledge to humanity, there by guiding the latter to salvation.

Once a devotee asked Bhagavan in a depressed state of mind; "Is it not possible for a self-realized soul, to change the destiny of his devotee?" Hearing this, with a smile, Bhagavan asked "will any self-realized soul have any intention? He is not supposed to have any thought. It is impossible".

Devotee: "Then what will be our plight? We request you to bless us with your graceful vision. What is the use of coming to you and sitting in your presence? Should it not benefit us? How will this poor householder be benefited by you?"

Extending his graceful look towards him, Bhagavan said: "An arrow aimed at the head with an intention to split it might only blow off the crown. Similarly the evil consequences of the sinful acts of the devotees can be reduced by the mere presence of a realized soul. A spiritually qualified man will have no intention, but his presence itself will be very potent. His very presence might display super human miracles or might redeem sinful persons. It can appease the people. It can even liberate the matured seeker. It might not answer your requests directly. But all your doubts will be dissolved in his presence. His presence will confer voluntary boons on you. It is certain that a realised soul will take care of his devotees."

I left Ramanashram after some time and went on a pilgrimage up to Madurai. From there I reached Udipi one night. When I told the people at the inn there, that I wanted to go to Kumta, they informed me that a bus was plying between the two places. When I told them that I had no money and would therefore walk the distance, they asked me if I had not even an anna (1/16 of the Indian rupee). When I said no, they asked me how I would cross the seven or eight rivers on the way, if I had not even this small amount. They laughed at me saying that all my actions looked funny. The next morning I approached a tea-stall owner in the neighborhood and asked him to give me an anna. His servant, on hearing this, began to ridicule me, beating his thigh like a tabor and said, "Why don?t you stay with my master here. He will give you food, money and clothing. You will have no worry." He laughed at me clapping his hands again and beating his mouth like a drum.

His words opened my eyes. I thought of the small weaver-birds which, during hatching time, build wonderful nests upside down on branches of trees - a marvel of workmanship beyond all human art and ingenuity and leave them the moment they are no longer necessary. The Supreme Self resides in the nest of our body and leaves it when It does not want to stay there anymore. So long as It stays there, it is Its responsibility to provide for the body?s sustenance. Why should I then worry about getting food or money? If food comes of its own accord, I would eat, otherwise I would starve. Similarly if money comes to me, I would travel by bus or train; otherwise I would walk the distance. Musing thus, I decided not to ask for food or money from anyone. This has made me completely independent and free from bothering other people for my needs. The Lord is now taking care of me fulfilling all my needs even before I think of them in my mind. The joy and happiness one gets in this manner is far greater than when one makes a particular demand and has it fulfilled by God.

- Source: Experiences of Devotees of Bhagavan

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #107 on: March 27, 2016, 02:14:25 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

A bird may hover here and there and cannot in mid-heaven stay. It must come back the way it went to find at last on earth alone its resting place. Even so the soul must turn to You O, Aruna Hill, and merge again in You alone, Ocean of bliss.

- Sri Ramana Maharshi

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #108 on: March 29, 2016, 05:31:54 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

Bhagavan: When I was staying in the Skandashram I sometimes used to go out and sit on a rock. On one such occasion there were two or three others with me, including Rangaswami Iyengar. Suddenly we noticed some small moth-like insect shooting up like a rocket into the air from a crevice in the rock. Within the twinkling of an eye it had multiplied itself into millions of moths which formed a cloud and hid the sky from view. We wondered at it and examined the place from which it shot up. We found that it was only a pinhole and knew that so many insects could not have issued from it in such a short time.

That is how ahamkara [ego] shoots up like a rocket and instantaneously spreads out as the universe.

- Talk 616

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #109 on: March 31, 2016, 10:58:42 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
------------------------------------

The questioner asked again, "But first of all we must find a Guru who can give us sufficient practice and thereby enable us to get rid of these gunas, mustn?t we?"

"If we have the earnestness to get rid of these qualities can we not find a Guru? We must first have the desire to get rid of them. When once we have this the Guru will himself come, searching for us, or he will somehow manage to draw us to himself. The Guru will always be on the alert and keep an eye on us; Ishwara Himself will show us the Guru. Who else will look after the welfare of the children except the father himself? He is always with us, surrounding us. He protects us, as a bird protects its eggs by hatching them under the shelter of its wings. But we must have whole-hearted faith in Him," said Bhagavan.

A devotee, by name Sankaramma, who is generally afraid of asking Bhagavan questions, said quietly on hearing those words: "But Swamiji! Guru?s upadesa (instruction) is necessary for sadhana, isn't it?" Bhagavan replied, "Oh! Is that so? But that upadesa is being given every day. Those who are in need of it, may have it." Others present there said: "But Bhagavan must bless us that we may be enabled to receive the instruction. That is our prayer."

"The blessing is always there," replied Bhagavan.

(From 'Letters from Sri Ramanasramam' 91)

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #110 on: April 01, 2016, 09:41:12 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
------------------------------------

Bhagavan was reading something from a Malayalam book yesterday afternoon. Someone nearby enquired whether it was the Vasishtam, and Bhagavan replied in the affirmative. A Pandit who was there began discussing the stories in the Vasishtam, and said, "Swami, there will be several bondages for the attainment of realization, will there not?"

Bhagavan, who was reclining on the sofa, sat up and said, "Yes, that is so. They are the bondages of the past, the future and the present."
"Of past bondages there is a story in the Upanishads and also in the 'Vasudevan Mananam'. A brahmin with a large family acquired a she-buffalo and, by selling milk, curds, ghee, etc., he maintained his family. He was fully occupied the whole day with obtaining fodder, green grass, cotton seed, etc. for the buffalo and in feeding her. His wife and children passed away, one after the other. He then concentrated all his love and affection on the buffalo, but, after a time, the buffalo too passed away. Being thus left alone and disgusted with family life, he took to sannyasa, renouncing the world, and began practising prayer and meditation at the feet of a Holy Teacher (Sadguru).
'After some days, the Guru called him and said, 'You have been doing spiritual practices (sadhana) for several days now. Have you found any benefit from them?' The brahmin then related the above story of his life, and said, 'Swami, at that time I used to love the buffalo mostly because it was the mainstay of my family. Though it passed away long ago, yet when I am deeply engrossed in meditation, it always appears in my thoughts. What am I to do?' The Guru, realizing that it was a past bondage, said, 'My dear friend, the Brahman is said to be 'asti, bhati and priyam'. 'Asti' means omnipresent; 'bhati' means lustre; 'priyam' means love. That buffalo, being an object of your love, it also is the Brahman. It has a name and a form; so what you should do is to give up your own name and form as well as those of the buffalo. If that is done, what remains is the Brahman itself. Therefore, give up names and forms and meditate.'

"The brahmin then meditated, giving up both of them, and attained realization (jnana). Name and form are past bondages. The fact is, that which IS, is only one. It is omnipresent and universal. We say 'here is a table', 'there is a bird', or 'there is a man'. There is thus a difference in name and form only, but That which IS, is present everywhere and at all times. That is what is known as asti, omnipresent. To say that a thing is existent, there must be someone to see ? a Seer. That intelligence to see is known as bhati. There must be someone to say, 'I see it, I hear it, I want it'. That is priyam. All these three are the attributes of nature ? the natural Self. They are also called existence consciousness, bliss (sat-chit-ananda)."

Another devotee queried, "If priyam (Love), is a natural attribute, it should be existent no matter what the object may be. Why then is it not existent when we see a tiger or a snake?"

Bhagavan replied, "We ourselves may not have any love for them, but every species has love towards its own kind, hasn?t it? A tiger loves a tiger, and a snake a snake. So also a thief loves a thief and a debauchee a debauchee. Thus, love is always existent. There is a picture presented to you on a screen. That screen is asti, omnipresent, and the light that shows the pictures is bhati and priyam, lustre and love. The pictures with names and forms come and go. If one is not deluded by them and discards them, the canvas screen, which has been there all through, remains as it is. We see pictures on the screen with the help of a small light in an atmosphere of darkness; if that darkness be dispelled by a big light, can the pictures be visible? The whole place becomes luminous and lustrous. If, in the same way, you see the world with the small light called mind, you find it full of different colours. But if you see it with the big light known as Self-realization (atma-jnana), you will find that it is one continuous universal light and nothing else."

- 'Letters from Sri Ramanasramam' 147: THE OMNIPRESENT

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #111 on: April 03, 2016, 10:00:55 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
------------------------------------

BHAGAVAN AND DIETARY HABITS


Though Bhagavan generally respected visitor?s dietary habits and customs, so long as they were vegetarian, he did occasionally push people into situations in which they had to choose between observing their dietary habits and taking his Prasad.

On a new-moon day a group of very orthodox brahmins came to the ashram from town. They wanted to pay their respects to Bhagavan first and then have a bath and return to the town for tarpanam, a new-moon ceremony in which one worships one?s ancestors. As the ashram was situated between several burial grounds, the place was considered polluting. After leaving it a bath was mandatory. Also, because of restrictions due to the new moon, the tarpanam ceremony and the proximity of burial grounds, they would not be able to eat food in the ashram. Bhagavan greeted them all and invited them to have breakfast with him. How could they refuse? They went to the dining hall, sat down and were served uppuma, a wheat dish cooked with spices and fried vegetables, and coffee. After the breakfast Bhagavan was explaining the nutritional and dietetic virtues of onion. Somebody remarked that onions carry their odour with them into every food.

'Not at all,' said Bhagavan. 'If you fry them in castor oil they lose their odour completely. Could you smell the onions in the uppuma? Have I not succeeded in making them odourless?'

The poor brahmins, who never touched onions and garlic, were shocked. What saved them from serious trouble with their caste was the fact that what they did or ate was at Bhagavan?s bidding!

An even more extreme example springs to mind. A devotee once brought some expensive halva for Bhagavan. The sweets were arranged on a large tray and put before Bhagavan on the ground. A dog came in and touched the sweets with his nose. One of the inmates got furious and tried to drive the dog away. Bhagavan got up and shouted at the devotee, 'Get out! What right have you to drive this dog away? On what grounds do you stop a dog from eating? Does this halva belong to you?' He cut the halva into pieces, ate some himself and distributed the rest with his own hands. All the people present had to eat it as his Prasad whether they wanted to or not.

Bhagavan was not always so insistent. My younger brother once came to the ashram. He was not in the habit of drinking tea or coffee and generally refused when he was offered some. When the afternoon cup of coffee was distributed, he asked to be excused. He was told that he must drink it, for all food given in the ashram, he was informed, was Bhagavan?s Prasad and cannot be refused.

My brother went straight to Bhagavan and said, "They say that coffee is your Prasad. I am not accustomed to coffee and I do not like it."
Bhagavan answered, 'I never ask for coffee. Whether I like it or not, people make me drink coffee, say that coffee is my prasad, and then drink coffee to their heart?s content. They also induce others to drink it, saying that if they refuse, they refuse my prasad.'

This reminds me of another 'coffee' incident. One of the devotees nursed a grudge against the ashram management. He asserted loudly that distinctions were made between guests. He claimed he was not being given the same hospitality that others were. He brought his complaint to Bhagavan along with his cup of afternoon coffee. Just then a mug was served to Bhagavan.

The devotee exclaimed, 'You see, even Bhagavan is given special coffee! Look at mine, how thin it is!'

Bhagavan said nothing, but took the man?s cup and exchanged it for his own mug. The disgruntled devotee tasted it. It was a bitter decoction of jungle herbs! Only Bhagavan had the courage to drink it. Nobody else could stand it. The poor man was in a quandary, for he had asked for it himself and got it from Bhagavan?s own hands. To him, as a Hindu, it was Prasad, a sacred offering. Never in his life did Prasad taste so bitter!

At least this man had the courage to drink his bitter medicine. Those who refused Bhagavan's real Prasad often found themselves landing in trouble. A lawyer, Sri Ramidipudi Ramakrishnaiah, came from Nellore with a long list of questions. He was quite proud of his questions and was sure that even Bhagavan would find them difficult to answer. But when he came to the hall and sat before Bhagavan, his mind became paralyzed and he could not ask a single question.

He had to leave for Nellore by an early train, so he went in search of Bhagavan to take leave of him. He found him in the kitchen, preparing iddlies and coffee. Bhagavan asked him to sit down and have his breakfast before going. But our lawyer said he was in a hurry.
'I must catch the train. I will breakfast at the station.'

So saying, he rushed off. On the way to the station he met a bus driver who assured him that he would reach Katpadi earlier if he caught a bus. He got into the bus, but the bus broke down on the road. He was late for the Gudur train, took the train to Madras, reached Madras very late and caught the Nellore train when it was already streaming out. He reached Nellore late in the night, ravenously hungry, having not eaten since the day before. He was beginning to regret turning down Bhagavan?s invitation to eat breakfast with him. When he asked for food, there was none ready in the house.

'Then make some,' he said, 'I haven?t eaten all day.'
'It is not allowed,' he was told. His father?s death anniversary was due to be celebrated the following day, and he was barred from eating until the function was over. The next day the ceremonies were delayed, so he only managed to eat late in the afternoon, after a fast of over forty hours! Had he listened to Bhagavan, all this would not have happened.

-KRISHNA BHIKSHU

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #112 on: April 04, 2016, 09:06:25 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

HAVE YOU COME TO BITE ME AGAIN?


Sri Bhagavan has all along been very fond of watching the behaviour of animals and has thus become an expert in anticipating their reactions in given circumstances and in knowing how to deal with them to help them. His sympathy and consideration for them seem to exceed even those for humans.

Yet he sometimes appears gently severe with them, which puzzles some devotees, as it did once puzzle me in the following incident, which was entered in my diary under the date of 28th March, 1943, and which I feel to the point to record here under:

"On the 24th. instant at 10-30 a.m. the Master was dozing. A female squirrel leapt on his couch and bit his thumb (Obviously to draw the Master?s attention) which he quickly pulled back and stroked, remarking, 'I'll not feed her.'

Other squirrels crowded on his couch and for half an hour he continued to feed them with cashew nuts, one nut at a time to each. Then he turned to us and, pointing to one of them, said:

'This She-squirrel has been trying to fool me, thinking I do not recognise her, and so shall feed her. Once she comes from this side, once from the other, once from under the couch and once from above it. But I recognise her very well. She shall not have anything,' and laughed.

At that the following vague thought crossed my mind:
' Where is the Christ?s injunction that if a man slaps you on one cheek offer him the other?'

"Today a squirrel jumped from the window to the couch. The Master looked at it intently. He gave it a nut, then another and addressed it:
'Now go. Have you come to bite me again?'

I quickly guessed that that was the guilty squirrel of four days ago and wondered how Sri Bhagavan recognised it and relented.Nevertheless, I asked him if my guess was right, and he confirmed it. After a while the same squirrel came back for more nuts. Usually the Master continues to feed the animals till of their own accord they cease to come. But to this one he refused to give again and, seeing it persisting, he lifted his fan in threat, which made it disappear at once.

Then he sat with pensive look and a faint smile on his face. After a while he turned in my direction, broadened his smile and softly spoke in Tamil in his usual telegraphic brevity to my neighbour:

'Even animals understand a rebuke and, if it is repeated a sufficient number of times, they learn to behave. Some of them are more sensible than some others....'

This was immediately translated to me. I laughed, frankly admitted the vague thought I had had on the first day, and added that although I had never doubted Sri Bhagavan?s wisdom, that thought needed the explanation, which made the Master nod approvingly."

- S.S. Cohen in 'GURU RAMANA'

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #113 on: April 06, 2016, 09:51:47 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

HAPPINESS AND MISERY IN CREATION
4th May, 1937

A book is being read in which a question occurs whether the world was created for happiness or misery. All eyes turn to Sri Bhagavan for the answer.

Bhagavan: "Creation is neither good nor bad; it is as it is. It is the human mind which puts all sorts of constructions on it, as it sees things from its own angle and as it suits its own interests. A woman is just a woman, but one mind calls her "mother," another "sister," and still another "aunt" and so on. Men love women, hate snakes, and are indifferent to the grass and stones by the roadside. These connections are the causes of all the misery in the world.

Creation is like a peepul tree: birds come to eat its fruit, or take shelter under its branches, men cool themselves in its shade, but some may hang themselves on it. Yet the tree continues to lead its quiet life, unconcerned with, and unaware of, all the uses it is put to. It is the human mind that creates its own difficulties and then cries for help. Is God so partial as to give peace to one person and sorrow to another? In creation there is room for everything, but man refuses to see the good, the healthy and the beautiful, and goes on whining, like the hungry man who sits beside a tasty dish and, instead of stretching out his hand to satisfy his hunger, he goes on lamenting. Whose fault is it, God's or man's? But fortunately for man, God, in His infinite mercy, never forsakes him. He always gives him new chances by providing Gurus and Scriptures to guide him to find the errors of his ways and ultimately gain eternal happiness.

Visitor: "We know that the pleasures of this world are useless and even painful, yet we long for them. What is the way of ending that longing?"

Bhagavan: "Think of God and attachments will gradually drop from you. If you wait till all desires disappear to start your devotion and prayer, you will have to wait a very, very long time indeed."

- From, "Guru Ramana" Memories and notes by S.S Cohen

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #114 on: April 10, 2016, 12:55:17 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
------------------------------------

'What is happiness?'

Happiness is the very nature of the Self; happiness and the Self are not different. There is no happiness in any object of the world. We imagine through our ignorance that we derive happiness from objects. When the mind goes out, it experiences misery. In truth, when its desires are fulfilled, it returns to its own place and enjoys the happiness that is the Self. Similarly, in the states of sleep, samadhi and fainting, and when the object desired is obtained or the object disliked is removed, the mind becomes inward-turned, and enjoys pure Self-Happiness. Thus the mind moves without rest alternately going out of the Self and returning to it. Under the tree the shade is pleasant; out in the open the heat is scorching. A person who has been going about in the sun feels cool when he reaches the shade. Someone who keeps on going from the shade into the sun and then back into the shade is a fool. A wise man stays permanently in the shade. Similarly, the mind of the one who knows the truth does not leave Brahman. The mind of the ignorant, on the contrary, revolves in the world, feeling miserable, and for a little time returns to Brahman to experience happiness. In fact, what is called the world is only thought. When the world disappears, i.e. when there is no thought, the mind experiences happiness; and when the world appears, it goes through misery.

- 'Who Am I?', Q. 24

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #115 on: April 12, 2016, 05:57:30 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
------------------------------------

16--9--1945 -- Afternoon
Devotee : All books say that the guidance of a GURU is necessary.
Sri Bhagavan : The GURU will say only what I am saying now. He will not give you anything you have not already. It is impossible for anyone to get what he has not got already. Even if he gets any such thing, it will go as it came. What comes will also go. What always is, will alone remain. The GURU cannot give you anything new, which you have not already. Removal of the notion that we have not realised the SELF, is all that is required. We are always the SELF. Only, we don't realise it.
**********************
30--10--1945 -- Afternoon
Devotee : While all say GURU's direction is necessary, it seems Sri Bhagavan has said a GURU is not necessary.
Sri Bhagavan : I have not said so. But, a GURU need not always be in human form. First a person thinks he is an inferior and that there is a superior, all-knowing and all-poerful GOD who controls his own and the world's destiny, and worships him or does bhakti. When he reaches a certain stage and becomes fit for enlightenment, the same GOD whom he was worshipping, comes as GURU and leads him on. That GURU comes only to tell him, "The GOD is within yourself. Dive within and realise'. GOD, GURU and the SELF are the same.

D.: But, in Sri Bhagavan's case there was no GURU !
Sri Bhagavan : The whole world was my GURU. It has been alreaqdy said that GURU need not be in human form and that the SELF within, GOD and GURU are the same.

D.: I once asked my Gurudev - Sri Aurobindo - about this and he said : "A spiritual Hercules like Sri Bhagavan needs no GURU".
Sri Bhagavan : Everything in the world was my GURU. Don't you know that Dattatreya, when he was asked by the King which GURU had taught him the Secret of Bliss, replied that the earth, water, fire, animals, men, etc., all were his GURUs and went on explaining how some of these taught him to cling to what was good and others taught him what things he should avoid as bad.
*************************

22--11--1945 -- Afternoon
The talk then turned to the Names of God and Sri Bhagavan said : "Each should be allowed to go his own way, the way for which alone he may be built. It will not do to convert him to another path by violence. The GURU will go with the disciple in his own path and then gradually turn him into the Supreme Path, at the ripe moment. Suppose, a car is going at top speed. To stop it at once or to turn it at once, would be attended by disastrous consequences".

---from "Day by Day with Bhagavan" , pp.18, 33, 49

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #116 on: April 18, 2016, 11:09:14 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

"He that has earned the Grace of the Guru shall undoubtedly be saved and never forsaken, just as the prey that has fallen into the tiger's jaws will never be allowed to escape."

- From 'Who Am I?'

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #117 on: April 22, 2016, 06:59:30 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

'vayurodhanat liyyathe manah; jalapakshivat rodhasadhanam'

'The mind may be subdued by regulating the breath, just as a bird is restrained when caught in a net.'

- Upadesa Saram, Verse 11

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #118 on: April 26, 2016, 09:34:55 PM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

O man, like a parrot waiting expectantly for the silkcotton
fruit to ripen, you persist in your sufferings,
believing this world appearance to be real and
enjoyable; if the world is real simply because it
appears to your senses, then a mirage would be water.

- Guru Vachaka Kovai v. 24, (The Garland of Guru's Sayings)

Krishnan

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Re: Sri Bhagavan and animals, birds etc.,
« Reply #119 on: April 28, 2016, 07:40:42 AM »
Om Namo Bhagavate Sri Ramanaya
-------------------------------------

Self-enquiry by following the clue of aham-vritti is just like the dog tracing his master by his scent. The master may be at some distant unknown place, but that does not stand in the way of the dog tracing him. The master's scent is an infallible clue for the animal, and nothing else, such as the dress he wears, or his build and stature, etc., counts. To that scent the dog holds on undistractedly while searching for him, and finally it succeeds in tracing him.

- 'Be as you are'