Author Topic: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar  (Read 2744 times)

sanjaya_ganesh

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GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« on: June 03, 2013, 03:05:48 PM »
I. HAPPINESS

All beings desire happiness always, happiness without a tinge of sorrow. At the same time everybody loves himself best. The cause for love is only happiness. So, that happiness must lie within oneself. Further, that happiness is daily experienced by everyone in sleep when there is no mind. To attain that natural happiness one must know oneself. For that, Self-enquiry, ‘Who am I?’ is the chief means.

Happiness is the nature of the Self. They are not different. The only happiness there is, is of the Self. That is the truth. There is no happiness in worldly objects. Because of our ignorance we imagine we derive happiness from them.

If, as a man generally imagines, his happiness is due to external causes, it is reasonable to conclude that his happiness must increase with the increase of possessions and diminish in proportion to their diminution. Therefore, if he is devoid of possessions his happiness should be nil. What, however, is the real experience of man? Does it confirm this view? In deep sleep the man is devoid of all possessions, including his own body. Instead of being unhappy he is quite happy. Everyone desires to sleep soundly. The conclusion therefore is that happiness is inherent in man and is not due to external causes. One must realize his Self in order to open the store of unalloyed happiness.

There is a story in Panchadasi, which illustrates that our pains and pleasures are not due to facts but to our concepts.

Two young men of a village went on a pilgrimage to North India. One of them died there. But the other having picked up some job decided to return to his village only after some time. Meanwhile he came across a wandering pilgrim and sent word through him to his village about himself and his dead friend. The pilgrim conveyed the news and in doing so inadvertently changed the names of the living and the dead man. The result was that the dead man’s people were rejoicing that he was doing well and the living man’s people were in grief that he was dead.

I used to sit on the floor and lie on the ground. No cloth spread out. That is freedom. The sofa is a bondage. It is jail for me. I am not allowed to sit where and how I please. Is it not bondage? One must be free to do as one pleases and should not be served by others. ‘No want’ is the greatest bliss. It can be realized only by experience. Even an emperor is no match for a man with no wants.
Salutations to Bhagawan

Subramanian.R

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2013, 03:54:31 PM »

Dear Sanjaya,

Once there was a person who was devoted to Sri Bhagavan and had been seeing Him in Virupaksha Cave, sitting and sleeping
on a stone slab.  After many years he came to see Him in the present Asramam and on seeing Sri Bhagavan sitting on a couch
with pillows to support and incense sticks burning near Him, he said:  "Bhagavan !  'You' have been spoiled"  neenga romba kettu
poi vitteergaL.  Sri Bhagavan said 'Yes, 'I" have been spoiled.'

The 'I' the ego, has already been destroyed for Sri Bhagavan.  Thereafter whether He lived in Virupaksha Cave or on a couch
or even in a palace, there is no difference for a person with egoless state, a Jivan mukta. 

I am not sure whether the questioner understood this. But the devotees understood this and they all laughed.

Sri Bhagavan says in Upadesa Saram - Verse 20"

Where this 'I' notion faded
Now there as I, as I, arises
The One, the very Self, the Infinite.

Arunachala Siva.       

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2013, 04:15:17 PM »
Yes. Very true. And this is exactly the story when Suka was sent by Vyasa to meet Janaka. In a short summary - Vyasa told Suka that if there is any more queries left about Atma Jnana, he should visit Janaka. Suka went to meet Janaka in palace. When guards told Janaka that Suka had come, he said :"As him to wait outside palace". 2-3 days went by. Not even a flutter of emotion on Suka's face - same happiness with which he came. Guards reminded Janaka again. Then Janaka said - "OK. Now ask him to come inside. Put a stool and sit on it". few days passed. Same happiness and grace on his face. Next day Janaka came out and screamed seeing him - "Oh My Lord, Is this not son of Vyasa. Oh Lord, the whole palace and kingdom is yours. Please come in". Then he arranged silk beds and entire palace comforts to Suka. Suka had same happiness and grace. Seeing all this, Janaka just said - "Punyatman, you have nothing more to acquire in this world".

Sanjay
« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 05:18:53 PM by sanjaya_ganesh »
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2013, 06:24:51 AM »
THE SELF AND NON-SELF: THE REALITY AND THE WORLD

Existence or Consciousness is the only reality. Consciousness plus waking we call waking. Consciousness plus sleep we call sleep. Consciousness plus dream we call dream. Consciousness is the screen on which all the pictures come and go. The screen is real, the pictures are mere shadows on it.

The Self and the appearances therein, as the snake in the rope, can be well illustrated like this. There is a screen. On that screen first appears the figure of a king. He sits on a throne. Then before him on that same screen a play begins with various figures and objects, and the king on the screen watches the play on the same screen. The seer and the seen are mere shadows on the screen which is the only reality, supporting all the pictures. In the world also, the seer and the seen together constitute the mind, and the mind is supported by or based on the Self.

The ajata school of Advaita says, ‘Nothing exists except the one reality. There is no birth or death, no projection or drawing in, no sadhaka (aspirant), no mumukshu (one who desires to be liberated), no mukta (one who is liberated), no bondage, no liberation. The One Unity alone exists forever.’ To those who find it difficult to grasp this truth and ask, ‘How can we ignore this solid world we see all around us?’ the dream experience is pointed out and they are told, ‘All that you see depends on the seer. Apart from the seer there is no seen.’ This is called drishti-srishti vada, or the argument that one first creates out of his mind and then sees what his mind itself has created.

To those who cannot grasp even this and who further argue, ‘The dream experience is so short, while the world always exists. The dream experience was limited to me. But the world is felt and seen not only by me but by so many and we cannot call such a world nonexistent,’ the argument called srishti-drishti vada is addressed and they are told, ‘God first created such and such a thing out of such and such an element and then something else and so forth.’ That alone will satisfy them. Their minds are not otherwise satisfied and they ask themselves, ‘How can all geography, all maps, all sciences, stars, planets and the rules governing or relating to them, and all knowledge be totally untrue?’ To such it is best to say, ‘Yes. God created all this and so you see it.’ All these are only to suit the capacity of the hearers. The absolute can only be one.

There is first the white light, so to call it, of the Self, which transcends both light and darkness. In it no object can be seen. There is neither seer nor seen. Then there is also total darkness (avidya) in which no objects are seen. But from the Self proceeds a reflected light, the light of pure mind (manas), and it is this light which gives room for the existence of all the film of the world, which is seen neither in total light nor in total darkness, but only in the subdued or reflected light.

From the point of view of Jnana (Knowledge) or the Reality, the pain seen in the world is certainly a dream, [Contd...]
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2013, 09:29:48 AM »
From the point of view of Jnana (Knowledge) or the Reality, the pain seen in the world is certainly a dream, as is the world, of which any particular pain like hunger is an infinitesimal part. In the dream also you yourself feel hunger. You see others suffering from hunger. You feed yourself, and moved by pity feed the others whom you find suffering from hunger. So long as the dream lasted, all those pains were as real as you now think the pain in the world to be. It was only when you woke up that you discovered that the pain in the dream was unreal. You might have eaten to the full and gone to sleep. You dream that you work hard and long in the hot sun all day, are tired and hungry and want to eat a lot. Then you wake up and find your stomach is full and you have not stirred out of your bed. But this does not mean that while you are in the dream you can act as if the pain you feel is not real. The hunger in the dream has to be assuaged by the food in the dream. The fellow beings you found so hungry in the dream had to be provided with food in that dream. You can never mix up the two states, the dream and the waking state. Till you reach the state of jnana and thus wake out of maya you must do social service by relieving suffering whenever you see it. But even then you must do it without ahankara, i.e., without the sense of ‘I am the doer’, but with the feeling ‘I am the Lord’s tool’. Similarly one must not be conceited by thinking, ‘I am helping a man below me. He needs help. I am in a position to help. I am superior and he inferior.’ But you must help the man as a means of worshipping God in that man. All such service is for the Self and not for anybody else. You are not helping anybody else, but only yourself.

The book Kaivalya Navaneeta has asked and answered six questions on maya. They are instructive:
1. What is maya? The answer is: It is anirvachaniya or indescribable.

2. To whom does it come? The answer is: To the mind or ego who feels that he is a separate entity, who thinks ‘I do this’ or ‘This is mine’.

3. Where does it come from and how did it originate? The answer: Nobody can say.

4. How did it arise? The answer is: Through non-vichara, through failure to enquire ‘Who am I?’

5. If the Self and maya both exist, does this not invalidate the theory of Advaita? The answer is: It need not, since maya is dependent on the Self as the picture is on the screen. The picture is not real in the sense that the screen is real.

6. If the Self and maya are one, could it not be argued that the Self is of the nature of maya and that it is also illusory? The answer is: No, the Self can be capable of producing illusion without being illusory. A conjuror may create for our entertainment the illusion of people, animals and things, and we see all of them as clearly as we see him, but after the performance he alone remains and all the visions he created have disappeared. He is not a part of the vision but solid and real.


[Contd...]
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2013, 07:28:42 AM »
The books use the following illustration to help explain creation: The Self is like the canvas for a painting. First a paste is smeared over it to close the small holes that are in the canvas. This paste can be compared to the Antaryamin (Indweller) in all creation. Then the artist makes an outline on the canvas. This can be compared to the sukshma sarira (subtle body) of all creatures; for instance, the light and sound (bindu and nada) out of which all things arise. Within this outline the artist paints his picture with colours, etc., and this can be compared to the gross forms that constitute the world.

Vedanta says that the cosmos springs into view simultaneously with the seer. There is no creation by stages or steps. It is similar to the creation in dream where the experiencer and the objects of experience come into existence at the same time. To those who are not satisfied with this explanation, theories of gradual creation are offered in books.

It is not at all correct to say that advaitins of the Sankara school deny the existence of the world, or that they call it unreal. On the other hand, it is more real to them than to others. Their world will always exist whereas the world of the other schools will have origin, growth and decay, and as such cannot be real. They only say that the world as ‘world’ is not real, but that the world as Brahman is real. All is Brahman, nothing exists but Brahman, and the world as Brahman is real.

The Self is the one Reality that always exists, and it is by the light of the Self that all other things are seen. We forget it and concentrate on the appearance. The light in the hall burns both when persons are enacting something, as in a theatre, and when nothing is being enacted. It is the light which enables us to see the hall, the persons and the acting. We are so engrossed with the objects or appearances revealed by the light, that we pay no attention to the light. In the waking or dream state in which things appear, and in the sleep state in which we see nothing, there is always the light of Consciousness or Self, like the hall lamp which is always burning. The thing to do is to concentrate on the seer and not on the seen, not on the objects, but on the Light which reveals them.

[Contd...]
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2013, 02:15:16 PM »
Questions about the reality of the world, and about the existence of pain or evil in the world, will all cease when you enquire ‘Who am I?’ and find out the seer. Without a seer the world and the evils thereof alleged do not exist.

The world is of the form of the five categories of sense objects, and nothing else. These five kinds of objects are sensed by the five senses. As all are perceived by the mind through these five senses, the world is nothing but the mind. Is there a world apart from the mind?

Though the world and consciousness emerge and disappear together, the world shines or is perceived only through consciousness. That source wherein both these arise and disappear, and which itself neither appears nor disappears, is the perfect Reality

If the mind, the source of all knowledge and activity subsides, the vision of the world will cease. Just as knowledge of the real rope does not dawn till the fancied notion of the serpent disappears, vision (experience) of the Reality cannot be gained unless the superimposed vision of the universe is abandoned.

That which really exists is only the Self. The world, jiva (individual self) and Iswara (God) are mental creations, like the appearance of silver in mother of pearl. All these appear at the same time and disappear similarly. The Self alone is the world, the ego and Iswara.

To the jnani it is immaterial whether the world appears or not. Whether it appears or not, his attention is always on the Self. Take the letters and the paper on which they are printed. You are wholly engrossed with the letters and have no attention left for the paper. But the jnani thinks only of the paper as the real substratum, whether the letters appear or not.

You make all kinds of sweets from various ingredients and in various shapes, and they all taste sweet because there is sugar in all of them, and sweetness is the nature of sugar. In the same way, all experiences and the absence of them contain the illumination, which is the nature of the Self. Without the Self they cannot be experienced, just as without sugar not one of the articles you make can taste sweet.

The Immanent Being is called Iswara. Immanence can only be with maya. It (Iswara) is the Knowledge of Being along with maya. From the subtle conceit Hiranyagarbha rises; from Hiranyagarbha the gross, concrete Virat rises. Chit-Atma is pure Being only.

As regards the existence of pain in the world, the wise one explains from his experience, that if one withdraws within the Self there is an end of all pain. The pain is felt so long as the object is different from oneself. But when the Self is found to be an undivided whole, who and what is there to feel?

The Upanishadic text ‘I am Brahman’ only means Brahman exists as ‘I’.
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2013, 07:43:45 AM »
III. MIND

Mind is a wonderful force inherent in the Self.
That which rises in this body as ‘I’ is the mind.

When the subtle mind emerges through the brain and the senses, the gross names and forms are cognized. When it remains in the Heart, names and forms disappear.... If the mind remains in the Heart, the ‘I’ or the ego which is the source of all thoughts will go, and the Self, the Real, Eternal ‘I’ alone will shine. Where there is not the slightest trace of the ego, there is the Self.

Mind and breath have the same source. Hence breath is controlled when mind is controlled and mind when breath is controlled. Breath is the gross form of the mind.

Pranayama (breath control) is only an aid to subdue the mind and will not serve to kill it. Like pranayama, worship of a deity, japa (repetition) with a mantra, strict regulation of diet are all aids for mind control.

Control of breath (pranayama) may be internal or external. The internal is as follows: Naham (the idea I am not the body) is rechaka (exhalation), Koham (Who am I?) is puraka (inhalation), Soham (I am He) is kumbhaka (retention of breath). Doing this, the breath becomes automatically controlled. External pranayama is for one not endowed with strength to control the mind. There is no way so sure as control of mind. Pranayama need not be exactly as prescribed in hatha yoga. If engaged in japa, dhyana (meditation), bhakti, etc., just a little control of breath will suffice to control the mind. The mind is the rider and breath the horse. Pranayama is a check on the horse. By that check the rider is checked. Pranayama may be done just a little. To watch the breath is one way of doing it. The mind is drawn away from other activities by being engaged in watching the breath. That controls the breath, and the mind in its turn is also controlled. If rechaka and puraka are found difficult to practise, retention of breath alone for a short while may be practised while in japa, dhyana, etc. That too will yield good results.

There is no other way of controlling the mind except as prescribed in the books like the Gita, drawing in the mind as often as it strays or goes outward, and fixing it in the Self. Of course it will not be easy to do it. It will come only with practice or sadhana.

God illumines the mind and shines within it. One cannot know God by means of the mind. One can but turn the mind inwards and merge it in God.

The body composed of insentient matter cannot say ‘I’ (i.e., cannot be the cause of the ‘I- thought’). On the other hand, the Eternal Consciousness cannot have such a thing as birth. Between the two something arises within the dimensions of the body. This is the knot of matter and Consciousness (chit-jada-granthi), variously called bondage, jiva, subtle body, ego, samsara (attachment), mind, etc.

Bhagavan pointed to his towel and said, ‘We call this a white cloth, but the cloth and its whiteness cannot be separated; and it is the same with the illumination and the mind that unite to form the ego. The following illustration is given in the books: The lamp in the theatre is Para Brahman or illumination. It illuminates itself, the stage and the actors. We see the stage and the actors by its light, but the light still continues when there is no more play. Another illustration is an iron rod that is compared to the mind. Fire joins it and it becomes red hot. It glows and can burn things like fire, but still it has a definite shape unlike fire. If we hammer it, it is the rod that receives the blow, not the fire. The rod is the jivatman, the fire the Self or Paramatman. The mind can do nothing by itself. It emerges only with the illumination and can do no action good or bad, except with the illumination. But while the illumination is always there, enabling the mind to act well or ill, the pleasure or pain resulting from such action is not felt by the illumination, just as when you hammer a red hot iron it is not the fire but the iron that gets the hammering.

If we control the mind, it does not matter where we live.
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2013, 02:27:46 PM »
“WHO AM I?” - ENQUIRY

For all thoughts the source is the ‘I-thought’. The mind will merge only by Self-enquiry ‘Who am I?’ The thought ‘Who am l?’ will destroy all other thoughts and finally kill itself also. If other thoughts arise, without trying to complete them, one must enquire to whom did this thought arise. What does it matter how many thoughts arise? As each thought arises one must be watchful and ask to whom is this thought occurring. The answer will be ‘to me’. If you enquire ‘Who am I?’ the mind will return to its source (or where it issued from). The thought which arose will also submerge. As you practise like this more and more, the power of the mind to remain at its source is increased.

By means of a moderate quantity of satvic (pure) food, which is superior to all other rules and regulations of self discipline, the satvic or pure quality of the mind will grow and Self-enquiry will be helped.

Though ancient and timeless sense attachments in the shape of vasanas (subtle tendencies) may rise countless like the waves of the sea, they will all be destroyed as dhyana progresses. Without giving any room for doubt whether it would at all be possible to eradicate all those vasanas and be the Self alone, one must take hold ceaselessly of dhyana of the Self. However great a sinner one may be, instead of lamenting ‘I am a great sinner, how can I make any progress?’ one must completely forget the fact of being a sinner and earnestly pursue meditation of Self. He is then sure to succeed.

If the ego is present, all else will also exist. If it is absent, all else will also vanish. As ego is all this, to enquire what this ego is, is to give up all attachment.

Controlling speech and breath, and diving deep within oneself, as a man dives into water to recover something that has fallen there, one must find out the source whence the ego rises, by means of keen insight.

Enquiry, which constitutes the path of jnana, consists not in orally repeating ‘I’ ‘I’, but in searching by means of a deeply introverted mind wherefrom the ‘I’ springs. To think ‘I am not this’ or ‘I am that’ may be of help in the enquiry, but cannot be the actual enquiry.

When we quest within our mind ‘Who am I?’ and reach the Heart, ‘I’ topples down and immediately another entity will reveal itself proclaiming ‘I-I’. Even though it also emerges saying ‘I’, it does not connote the ego, but the One Perfect Existence.

If we unceasingly investigate the form of the mind, we find there is no such thing as the mind. This is the direct path open to all.

Thoughts alone constitute the mind, and for all thoughts the base or source is the ‘I-thought’. ‘I’ is the mind. If we go inward questing for the source of the ‘I’, the ‘I’ topples down. This is the jnana enquiry.


Where the ‘I’ merges, another entity emerges as ‘I-I’ of its own accord. That is the Perfect Self.

[Contd...]
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2013, 11:53:01 AM »
There is no use removing doubts. If we clear one doubt another arises and there will be no end of doubts. All doubts will cease only when the doubter and his source have been found. Seek for the source of the doubter, and you find he is really nonexistent. Doubter ceasing, doubts will cease.

Reality being yourself, there is nothing for you to realize. All are regarding the unreal as real. What is required is that you give up regarding the unreal as real. The object of all meditation (dhyana) or japa is only that, to give up all thoughts regarding the non-self, to give up many thoughts and to hold on to one thought. The object of all sadhana is to make the mind one-pointed, to concentrate it on one thought and thus exclude our many thoughts. If we do this, eventually even the one thought will go and the mind will get extinguished in its source.

When we enquire within ‘Who am I?’ the ‘I’ investigated is the ego. It is that which makes vichara (enquiry) also. The Self has no vichara. That which makes the enquiry is the ego. The ‘I’ about which the enquiry is made is also the ego. As the result of the enquiry the ego ceases to exist and only the Self is found to exist.

What is the best way of killing the ego? To each person that way is best which appears easiest or appeals the most. All the ways are equally good, as they lead to the same goal, which is the merging of the ego in the Self. What the bhakta calls surrender, the man who does vichara calls jnana. Both are trying to take the ego back to the source from which it sprang and make it merge there.

To ask the mind to kill itself is like making the thief the policeman. He will go with you and pretend to catch the thief, but nothing will be gained. So you must turn inward, and see from whence the mind rises and then it will cease to exist.

Breath and mind arise from the same source and when one of them is controlled the other is also controlled. As a matter of fact, in the quest method - which is more correctly ‘Whence am I?’ and not merely ‘Who am I?’ - we are not simply trying to eliminate, saying ‘We are not the body, nor the senses and so on’, to reach what remains as the ultimate reality, but we are trying to find out whence the ‘I-thought’ or the ego arises within us. The method contains within it, though implicitly and not expressly, the watching of the breath. When we watch wherefrom the ‘I-thought’ arises, we are necessarily watching the source of breath also, as the ‘I-thought’ and the breath arise from the same source.

Breath control may do as an aid but can never by itself lead to the goal. While doing it mechanically, take care to be alert in mind and to remember the ‘I- thought’ and the quest for its source. Then you will find that where the breath sinks, there the ‘I-thought’ arises. They sink and arise together. The ‘I-thought’ will also sink along with the breath. Simultaneously another luminous and infinite ‘I-I’ will emerge, and it will be continuous and unbroken. That is the goal. It goes by different names - God, Self, Kundalini, Shakti, Consciousness, etc.

[Contd...]
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2013, 11:27:35 AM »
Who am I?’ is not a mantra. It means that you must find out where in you the ‘I-thought’ arises, which is the source of all other thoughts. But if you find that vichara marga (path of enquiry) is too hard for you, you go on repeating ‘I-I’ and that will lead you to the same goal. There is no harm in using ‘I’ as a mantra. It is the first name of God.

I ask you to see where the ‘I’ arises in your body; but it is not really quite correct to say that the ‘I’ rises from and merges in the Heart on the right side of the chest. The Heart is another name for the Reality, and it is neither inside nor outside the body. There can be no in and out for it, since It alone is. I do not mean by ‘Heart’ any physiological organ, any plexus of nerves or anything like that, but so long as one identifies oneself with the body and thinks he is the body, he is advised to see in the body where the ‘I-thought’ rises and merges again. It must be the Heart at the right side of the chest, since every man of whatever race and religion and in whatever language he may be saying ‘I’, points to the right side of his chest to indicate himself. This is true all over the world. So that must be the place. And by keenly watching the emergence of the ‘I-thought’ on waking and its subsiding in sleep, one can see that it is in the Heart on the right side.

First know who you are. This requires no sastras (scripture) or scholarship. This is simple experience. The state of being is now and here all along. You have lost hold of yourself and are asking others for guidance. The purpose of philosophy is to turn the mind inward. “If you know yourself, no evil can come to you. Because you asked me I have told you this” (see Kaivalya Navaneeta). The ego comes up only holding you (the Self). Hold yourself and the ego will vanish. Until then the sage will be happy saying, ‘There is’, and the ignorant will be asking, ‘Where?’

Regulation of life, such as getting up at a fixed hour, bathing, doing mantra-japa, etc., all this is for people who do not feel drawn to Self-enquiry, or are not capable of it. But for those who can practise this method all rules and disciplines are unnecessary.

Undoubtedly it is said in some books, that one should go on cultivating one good quality after another and thus prepare for moksha; but for those who follow the jnana or vichara marga, their sadhana is itself quite enough for acquiring all daivic (divine) qualities; they need not do anything else.

What is Gayatri? It really means ‘Let me concentrate on That which illumines all’.
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2013, 08:45:51 PM »
SURRENDER

God will bear whatever burdens we put on Him. All things are being carried on by the omnipotent power of a Supreme God. Instead of submitting ourselves to It, why should we always be planning, ‘We should do this or that’. Knowing that the train carries all the load, why should we, travelling therein, suffer by carrying our small bundle on our heads, instead of leaving it on the train and being happy.

The story of Ashtavakra teaches that in order to experience Brahma Jnana all that is necessary is to surrender yourself completely to the Guru, to give up your notion of ‘I’ and ‘mine’. If these are surrendered, what remains is the Reality.

There are two ways of achieving surrender. One is looking into the source of the ‘I’ and merging into that source. The other is feeling, ‘I am helpless myself, God alone is all powerful, and except by throwing myself completely on Him, there is no other means of safety for me’; and thus gradually developing the conviction that God alone exists and the ego does not count. Both methods lead to the same goal. Complete surrender is another name for jnana or liberation.

Bhakti is not different from mukti. Bhakti is being as the Self. One is always That. He realizes It by the means he adopts. What is bhakti? To think of God. That means only one thought prevails to the exclusion of all other thoughts. That thought is of God, which is the Self, or it is the self surrendered unto God. When He has taken you up, nothing else will assail you.

The absence of thought is bhakti. It is also mukti.
Bhakti is Jnana Mata, i.e., the mother of jnana.


It is asked, why all this creation so full of sorrow and evil. All one can say is that it is God’s will, which is inscrutable. No motive, no desire, no end to achieve can be attributed to that infinite, all-wise and all-powerful Being. God is untouched by activities which take place in His presence. There is no meaning in attributing responsibility and motive to the One, before it became many. But God’s will for the prescribed course of events is a good solution for the vexed question of free-will. If the mind is worried over what befalls us, or what has been committed or omitted by us, it is wise to give up the sense of responsibility and free-will, by regarding ourselves as the ordained instruments of the All-Wise and the All-Powerful, to do and suffer as He pleases. Then He bears all the burdens and gives us peace.

A Maharani told Bhagavan, ‘I am blessed with everything that a human being would like to have’. Her Highness’s voice choked. Controlling herself she continued slowly, ‘I have all that I want, a human being may want... but... but... I do not have peace of mind. Something prevents it. Probably my destiny’. There was silence for a while. Then Bhagavan spoke in his usual sweet manner: ‘All right, you have said what you wished to say. Well, what is destiny? There is no destiny. Surrender, and all will be well. Throw all responsibility on God and do not bear the burden yourself. What can destiny do to you then?’

Devotee: Surrender is impossible.
Bhagavan: Yes, complete surrender is impossible. Partial surrender is certainly possible for all. In course of time that will lead to complete surrender. Well, if surrender is impossible what can be done? There is no peace of mind. You are helpless to bring it about. It can be done only by surrender.

D: Partial surrender - well, can it undo destiny?
B: Oh yes, it can.
D: Is not destiny due to past karma?
B: If one is surrendered to God, God will look to it.
D: That being God’s dispensation, how does God undo it?
B: All are in Him only.

To a devotee who was praying that she should have more frequent visions of Siva, Bhagavan said, “Surrender to Him and abide by His Will, whether He appears or disappears; await His pleasure. If you ask Him to do as you like it is not surrender but command to God. You cannot have Him obey you and yet think you have surrendered. He knows what is best and when and how to do it. His is the burden. You have no longer any cares. All your cares are His. Such is surrender. That is bhakti.”
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2013, 04:45:02 PM »
THE THREE STATES: WAKING, DREAM AND SLEEP

There is no difference between the dream and the waking state except that the dream is short and the waking long. Both are the result of the mind. Our real state is called turiya, which is beyond the waking, dream and sleep states.

The Self alone exists and remains as It is. The three states owe their existence to avichara (non-enquiry), and enquiry puts an end to them. However much one may explain, this fact will not become clear until one attains Self-realization, and wonders how he was blind to the self-evident and only existence for so long.

All that we see is a dream, whether we see it in the dream state or waking state. On account of some arbitrary standards about the duration of the experience and so on, we call one experience a dream and another waking experience. With reference to Reality both the experiences are unreal. A man might have an experience such as getting anugraha (grace) in his dream, and the effects and influence of it on his entire subsequent life may be so profound and abiding, that one cannot call it unreal - whilst calling real some trifling incident in the waking life that just flits by, which is casual, of no consequence and is soon forgotten. Once I had an experience, a vision or a dream, whatever you may call it. I and some others, including Chadwick, had a walk on the hill. Returning, we were walking along a huge street with great buildings on either side. Pointing out the street and the buildings, I asked Chadwick and others, whether anybody could say that what we were seeing was a dream, and they all replied, ‘Which fool will say so?’ We then walked along, entered the hall and the vision or dream ceased, or I woke up. What are we to call this?

Just before waking up from sleep, there is a very brief state, free from thought. That should be made permanent.

In dreamless sleep there is no world, no ego and no unhappiness, but the Self remains. In the waking state there are all of these. Yet there is the Self. One has only to remove the transitory happenings in order to realize the ever-present beatitude of the Self.

Your nature is bliss. Find that on which all the rest are imposed and you then remain as the pure Self.

In sleep there is no space or time. They are concepts, which arise after the ‘I-thought’ has arisen. You are beyond time and space. The ‘I-thought’ is the limited ‘I’. The real ‘I’ is unlimited, universal, beyond time and space. Just while rising from sleep and before seeing the objective world, there is a state of awareness which is your Pure Self. That must be known.
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2013, 08:49:16 AM »
GRACE AND GURU

I have not said that a Guru is not necessary. But a Guru need not always be in human form. First a person thinks that he is inferior and that there is a superior, all-knowing, all powerful God who controls his own and the world’s destiny and worships him or does bhakti. When he reaches a certain stage and becomes fit for enlightenment, the same God whom he was worshipping comes as Guru and leads him onward. That Guru comes only to tell him, ‘That God is within yourself. Dive within and realize’. God, Guru and the Self are the same.

Realization is the result of the Master’s (Guru’s) grace, more than teachings, lectures, meditations, etc. They are only secondary aids, whereas the former is the primary and essential cause.

Guru’s grace is always there. You imagine it to be something somewhere high up in the sky, far away and which has to descend. It is really inside you in your Heart, and the moment, by any of the methods, you effect subsidence or merger of the mind into its source, the grace rushes forth, spouting as from a spring from within you.

Contact with jnanis is good. They will work through silence. A Guru is not the physical form. Hence His contact remains even after the physical form of the Guru vanishes.

After your bhakti to God has matured you, God comes in the shape of a Guru and from outside pushes your mind inside, while being inside as Self He draws you there from within. Such a Guru is needed generally, though not for very rare and advanced souls.

One can go to another Guru after one’s Guru passes away. But after all, Gurus are one, as none of them are the form. Mental contact is always the best.

Sat Sang means association with Sat or Reality. One who knows or has realized Sat is also regarded as Sat. Such association is absolutely necessary for all. Sankara has said, “In all the three worlds there is no boat like sat sang to carry one safely across the ocean of births and deaths.”

Guru not being physical, His contact will continue after His form vanishes. If one Jnani exists in the world, His influence will be felt by or benefit all people in the world, and not simply His immediate disciples. As described in Vedanta Chudamani, all the people in the world can be put under four categories: The Guru’s disciples, bhaktas, those who are indifferent to Him and those who are hostile to Him. All these will be benefited by the existence of the Jnani - each in his own way and to various degrees.

From the book, Divine Grace Through Total Self-Surrender by D. C. Desai, Bhagavan read out the following quotations by Paul Brunton for our benefit:

“Divine Grace is a manifestation of the cosmic free will in operation. It can alter the course of events in a mysterious manner through its own unknown laws, which are superior to all natural laws, and can modify the latter by interaction. It is the most powerful force in the universe.

[Contd...]
Salutations to Bhagawan

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: GEMS from bhagawan - Devaraja Mudaliar
« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2013, 09:14:07 AM »
“It descends and acts only when it is invoked by total self-surrender. It acts from within, because God resides in the Heart of all beings. Its whisper can be heard only in a mind purified by self-surrender and prayer.

“Rationalists laugh at it, and atheists scorn it, but it exists. It is a descent of God into the soul’s zone of awareness. It is a visitation of force unexpected and unpredictable. It is a voice spoken out of cosmic silence - It is ‘Cosmic Will which can perform authentic miracles under its own laws’.”

In truth, God and the Guru are not different. Just as the prey which has fallen into the jaws of a tiger has no escape, so those who have come within the ambit of the Guru’s gracious look will be saved by the Guru and will not get lost; yet, each one should by his own effort pursue the path shown by God or Guru and gain release.

Each seeker after God should be allowed to go his own way, the way for which he alone may be built (meant). It will not do to convert him to another path by violence. The Guru will go with the disciple in his own path and then gradually turn him onto the Supreme path at the ripe moment. Suppose a car is going at top speed. To stop it at once or to turn it at once would be attended with disastrous consequences.
Salutations to Bhagawan