Author Topic: The Quest - Spiritual Life - Lucia Osborne - Deepam, 2011 of Mountain Path.  (Read 1088 times)

Subramanian.R

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Before a child can walk, it is supported on both sides and held up.  As it gains strength and confidence, the support diminishes,
and finally ceases so that it can learn to walk alone not without falls and stumbles, till walking becomes natural.  Similarly with
Sadhana.  When I first came to Sri Bhagavan, and started to meditate according to His teaching, the Grace and support were
tremendous, a time of discovery and sheer wonder.  Such undeserved Grace may also be vouchsafed to those who need more
encouragement than others to make them know what the real aim is.

Normally we are submerged in the innumerable shifts and changes of life and so we are caught up in the world, with its troubles
and confusions.  To be deluded and to suffer belongs to the state of all human beings interspersed with a little unsteady happiness.
We live in a belt of illusory time with birth, old age, and death.  It is in this state, which is said to be superior to the state of
angels that we can work out our destiny and awaken our primordial divine state in timelessness where there is no birth or death.

It is a return to the All-source relatively speaking because the departure was an illusion, a dream from which one has to wake
up.  If a man is well he takes it for granted.  When he returns to his well being after severe illness or suffering how great and
precious is his well being.   How much more so, how sublime the return to All source after suffering of embodied existence which
is said to be the greatest suffering.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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continues.....

Meditation that leads to Self Realization is neither idle reverie nor vacant inaction but an intense inner struggle to master
the mind and then use it like any other instrument, like a silent missile to penetrate the barrier of the five senses and the
discursive intellect.

It is the greatest, most worthwhile effort a human being is capable of.  It demands determination, steadfastness and courage,
particularly,  so when after a period of Grace one feels abandoned,, desperate, at being left alone to struggle like a deer that
is trapped.  This is the time when one can rise much higher than when one is made to feel good and successful by self styled
gurus with some siddhis like thought reading and hypnotic or magnetic powers.  It is the ego which feels good and 'special'.

'God, Guru and the Self are the same',  Sri Bhagavan affirmed.  'Grace is always there.  We are never out of its operation.  It is
only the clouded mind which does not feel it.  Yet, though effort it can experience Grace.'

Questions about renunciation were also asked frequently and the explanation that Sri Bhagavan gave usually was that true
renunciation is in the mind and is neither achieved by physical renunciation nor impeded by lack of it.  The life of action need not
be renounced.  If one meditates for an hour or two everyday then the current of mind induced will continue to flow even in the midst
of work.  It is possible to perform all the activities of life with detachment and regard only the Self as real.  Actions tend to express
and follow the line taken in meditation.

People sometimes assume ochre robes and play the part of renunciates when they have comfortable assured incomes or are
looked after by someone who has to work to enable the renunciate not to work. With others it may be escapism from performing
the duties in life.

Bhagavan never encouraged young people to leave home and give up their duties in life.  When a man is ready for a life of pure
contemplation, everything falls into place of its own accord for him to do so.  'Sannyasa means renouncing one's individuality,
not shaving one's head and putting on ochre robes', Bhagavan affirmed.  'A man may be a householder but if he does not think
he is one, he is a sannyasin.  On the other hand he may be wearing ochre robes and wander about so long as he thinks he is
a sannyasin, he is not one.  To think about one's renunciation defeats the purpose of renouncing.  Why should your occupation
or duties in life interfere with your spiritual effort?  It is wrong to suppose that if one is fixed in the Self one's duties in life will
not be properly performed.'

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   
     
         

Subramanian.R

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continues.....

Nowadays one comes across so called communes, usually in the countryside, where a group of people lead a spiritual life
and practice Sadhana.  If combined with work which it usually is, it has more chance of success.

In the selfless performance of plain duty man mounts higher spirituality.  Huang Po cautions not to permit the events of our
daily life to bind us but never to withdraw from them.  Only by thus acting, can one become liberated. 

Reading books on spiritual matters and the sayings of wise men explained by questioning attitude in childhood and many
things became clear.  In the Genjokoan Shobogenzo writes:  'In the feeling of inadequacy of body and mind the dharma is
fulfilled.  But one should know also that in the feeling that the dharma has been fulfilled by body and mind something is still
lacking.'  I also read that Plotinus was ashamed of having a body.

In Plato's Dialogues Lady Diotima confirmed my conviction that whatever life has to offer will not quench the thirst in our soul
for true fulfillment. 'Wise man knew that so great is the human heart that nothing less than God, the return to the Source, their
divine Self will satisfy it.'

Seeking happiness, true happiness, means seeking one's true state.  But it is one thing to try to get happiness for oneself and
quiet another thing to try to establish the Kingdom of Heaven in the heart......

Even if so called good things in life are at one's disposal for enjoyment it does not satisfy the deepest longing of the human
heart and more often than not ends up in boredom.  In the depth of the heart remains an unfulfilled longing which only the
Unconditioned call fill.  Modern man flies to the planets and seeks to conquer space due to the unconscious urge to transcend
his earthly finitude.  This he does in physical manner which is the only one the majority believe to be possible.  There is no joy
or pleasure so great in this life that it can quench the thirst in our soul.  The efforts to conquer mountains, speed and to fly into
space prove that man does not live by bread alone.  There is the urge to escape from the tyranny of finitude; the urge for the
Infinite, for the Sublime, to seek the Holy Grail.

To illustrate: at the height of her career the greatest Russian ballerina, Anna Pavlova, said, 'There is a desert in my heart.'

Happiness derived from relationships, worldly success, acquisition, circumstances in general usually has an element of restlessness
combined with insecurity. 

'Happiness', said Aristotle, is the object of the good, but peace is the object of happiness.'  'Where is happiness without
peace?' asks the Gita,

******

Arunachala Siva.