Author Topic: Being Still - Summa Iruthal  (Read 6391 times)

Nagaraj

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Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« on: February 20, 2013, 04:44:16 PM »
Dear Friends,

I am just opening this thread and leaving it to us to express ourselves whenever we feel any musings on the topic "Being Still" or "Summa Iruthal" Just for our own individual contemplation. Thank you.
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2013, 04:46:23 PM »
Let me begin...

Unless we get rid ourselves of our sankalpas, we will never be able to truly be in abidance or being still, as our sankalpas or tendencies will keep prompting us to act in our own volition.
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2013, 06:12:24 PM »
Udai,

Taking what you have conveyed, being that stillness and not being the changing movie which are sankalpas, there is a witness and witnessed. Let me quote to you from Who am I -

What is called “mind” is a wondrous power residing in the Self. It causes all thoughts to arise. Apart from thoughts, there is no such thing as mind. Therefore, thought is the nature of mind. Apart from thoughts, there is no independent entity called the world. In deep sleep there are no thoughts, and there is no world. In the states of waking and dream, there are thoughts, and there is a world also. Just as the spider emits the thread (of the web) out of itself and again withdraws it into itself, likewise the mind projects the world out of itself and again resolves it into itself. When the mind comes out of the Self, the world appears. Therefore, when the world appears (to be real), the Self does not appear; and when the Self appears (shines) the world does not appear. When one persistently inquires into the nature of the mind, the mind will end leaving the Self (as the residue). What is referred to as the Self is the Atman. The mind always exists only in dependence on something gross; it cannot stay alone. It is the mind that is called the subtle body or the soul (jiva).

Therefore, your observation does not meet the pramana of Bhagavan as He has revealed as follows in the above -

When the mind comes out of the Self, the world appears. Therefore, when the world appears (to be real), the Self does not appear; and when the Self appears (shines) the world does not appear.

And the sankalpas cannot exist by themselves, as in the above revelation Bhagavan says -

the mind will end leaving the Self (as the residue)

The mind always exists only in dependence on something gross; it cannot stay alone

What you say is just one of the sheeths, if its pure, it is just Vijnanamaya kosha, wisdom-apparent-sheath (Vijnana) but not Ananda itself.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2013, 06:50:32 PM »
The first step is a quiet mind—silence is a further step, but quietude must be there; and by a quiet mind I mean a mental consciousness within which sees thoughts arrive to it and move about but does not itself feel that it is thinking or identifying itself with the thoughts or call them its own. Thoughts, mental movements may pass through it as wayfarers appear and pass from elsewhere through a silent country—the quiet mind observes them or does not care to observe them, but, in either case, does not become active or lose its quietude. Silence is more than quietude; it can be gained by banishing thought altogether from the inner mind keeping it voiceless or quite outside; but more easily it is established by a descent from above—one feels it coming down, entering and occupying or surrounding the personal consciousness which then tends to merge itself in the vast impersonal silence.
The words “peace, calm, quiet, silence” have each their own shade of meaning, but it is not easy to define them.

Peace—santi.

Calm—sthirata.

Quiet—acancalata.

Silence—niscala-niravata.

Quiet is a condition in which there is no restlessness or disturbance.

Calm is a still unmoved condition which no disturbance can affect—it is a less negative condition than quiet.

Peace is a still more positive condition; it carries with it a sense of settled and harmonious rest and deliverance.

Silence is a state in which either there is no movement of the mind or vital or else a great stillness which no surface movement can pierce or alter.

Sri Aurobindo


Nagaraj

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2013, 07:35:36 PM »
Sri Ravi,

Thank you, such an important post. "The first step is a quiet mind - silence is a further step" if we keep remembering and strive this alone, it would do us so much good.

Brings a very clear perspective now and give a whole picture in our palm, that cam never let us go astray in imagined knowledge.

it requires a closer study.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2013, 07:38:48 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Be still in utter silence, keeping your mind in the Self.

Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2013, 07:44:50 PM »
Dear Sir,

I am wondering, if it is bliss that is experienced keeping the mind in Self, why is it that we give in to our sankalpas of any kind, it goes to prove that even if it may mean temporary, we choose our sankalpa over keeping the mind in Self.

However, we are able to keep our minds absorbed in Self, some time, but not continuously as sahaja nirvikalpa.

my own intention is to see for myself or ourselves by our expressions here, that may give us some clues to bridge the void here.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2013, 07:55:42 PM »
Question : What is samadhi?
Ramana Maharshi : The state in which the unbroken experience of existence-consciousness is attained by the still mind, alone is samadhi. That still mind which is adorned with the attainment of the limitless supreme Self, alone is the reality of God.
When the mind is in communion with the Self in darkness, it is called nidra [sleep], that is, the immersion of the mind in ignorance. Immersion in a conscious or wakeful state is called samadhi. Samadhi is continuous inherence in the Self in a waking state. Nidra or sleep is also inherence in the Self but in an unconscious state. In sahaja samadhi the communion is con-tinuous.

Question : What are kevala nirvikalpa samadhi and sahaja nirvikalpa samadhi?
Ramana Maharshi :The immersion of the mind in the Self, but without its destruction, is kevala nirvikalpa samadhi. In this state one is not free from vasanas and so one does not therefore attain mukti. Only after the vasanas have been destroyed can one attain liberation.

Question : When can one practise sahaja samadhi?
Ramana Maharshi : Even from the beginning. Even though one practises kevala nirvikalpa samadhi for years together, if one has not rooted out the vasanas one will not attain liberation.

Question : May I have a clear idea of the difference between savikalpa and nirvikalpa?
Ramana Maharshi : Holding on to the supreme state is samadhi. When it is with effort due to mental disturbances, it is savikalpa. When these disturbances are absent, it is nirvikalpa. Remaining permanently in the primal state without effort is sahaja.

Question : Is nirvikalpa samadhi absolutely necessary before the attainment of sahaja?
Ramana Maharshi : Abiding permanently in any of these samadhis, either savikalpa or nirvikatpa, is sahaja [the natural state]. What is body-consciousness? It is the insentient body plus consciousness. Both of these must lie in another consciousness which is absolute and unaffected and which remains as it always is, with or without the body-consciousness. What does it then matter whether the body-consciousness is lost or retained, provided one is holding on to that pure consciousness? Total absence of body-consciousness has the advantage of making the samadhi more intense, although it makes no difference to the knowledge of the supreme.

(Be as you are)

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2013, 08:33:36 PM »
questions for reflection

is there any experience in being still?

abiding is being self,
can being be experience?

Self being the most intimate to us, must be the most desired object of desire as well.

what is the goal really?

are we really striving to the goal as directed by the sages?

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Jewell

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2013, 08:40:36 PM »
Dear Friends,

How i understood Be Still teaching,it is staying in ones own presence,or being,avoiding thoughts. Well,whille staying in the presence,there cannot be thoughts,and vice versa. Thoughts will sure come,and try to take our attention,but thats why constant coming back to self abidance is needed. Be Still for me means be without movements and thoughts. The mind,sure,is ment to be without movements. Just Be. Presene,Awareness,staying in the core of our being,our knowing and feeling that we are. That is not possible in any other way,to be without thoughts,exept in holding on ones very Presence and Abidance. To try to be without thoughts in any other way is impossible,by my thinking. Peace comes from that,peace is that which follows constant effort to Abide. Until it is effortless. Here is something i found from Bhagavan.

" The pure state of attention to the Self alone is one's own state of silence, which is devoid of any other thing.

 *
If you adhere to that path of silence, the means to liberation, there will be no suffering of any kind.

The supreme Reality that is liberation is experienced only by perfect silence. Indulging in thoughts drives it away.
*
 *
When one remains without thinking, one understands another by means of the universal language of silence. What one fails to know by conversation extending to several years can be known instantly through silence. Dakshinamurti is a good example of this. This is the highest and most effective language.

Initiation into silence is the most perfect initiation; it comprises looking, touching and teaching. It will purify the individual in every way and establish him in the Reality.
*
 *
Silence does not mean negation of activity or stagnant inertness. It is not a mere negation of thoughts but something more positive than you can imagine.
*
 *
The silence of the Self is ever there. As long as you run with the running mind you cannot have it. It is a supreme peace, immutable like a rock, that supports all your activities, in fact, all movements. It is in this silence that God and the liberated souls are rooted.

* *
In the state of silence one merely abides as 'I-I'. Apart from this, there is neither thinking nor knowing.

Silence will manifest itself when the clarity of Self-knowledge, which overflows with the exalted direct experience, causes the trinities of seer-seeing-seen and knower-knowing-known to depart.
"

With love and prayers,


 


 

 
« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 09:20:43 PM by Jewell »

Jewell

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #10 on: February 20, 2013, 08:48:41 PM »
Just to add,to make effort to be without thoughts,or to be too concerned with thoughys,is not aim of Selfenquiry,i believe. Leaving thoughts aside,just not giving them attention,and give our whole attention to Self only,is the true meaning of it. Constant Self Attention will itself make thoughts subdue and wanish.

Jewell

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #11 on: February 20, 2013, 09:15:59 PM »

eranilkumarsinha

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2013, 09:19:57 PM »
“How i understood Be Still teaching,it is staying in ones own presence,or being,avoiding thoughts. Well,whille staying in the presence,there cannot be thoughts,and vice versa. Thoughts will sure come,and try to take our attention,but thats why constant coming back to self abidance is needed. Be Still for me means be without movements and thoughts. Just Be. Presene,Awareness,staying in the core of our being,our knowing and feeling that we are. That is not possible in any other way,to be without thoughts,exept in holding on ones very Presence and Abidance. To try to be without thoughts in any other way is impossible,by my thinking. Peace comes from that,peace is that which follows constant effort to Abide. Until it is effortless.”


Dear Sri Jewell, yes, that is how I have always felt also. A wonderful expression, dear friend! Thanks very much.

Anil 

Ravi.N

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2013, 06:57:41 AM »
You can certainly go on developing the consciousness of the Witness Purusha above, but if it is only a witness and the lower Prakriti is allowed to have its own way, there would be no reason     why these conditions should ever stop. Many take that attitude – that the Purusha has to liberate itself by standing apart, and the Prakriti can be allowed to go on till the end of the life doing its own business – it is prАrabdha karma; when the body falls away, the Prakriti will drop also and the Purusha go off into the featureless Brahman! This is a comfortable theory, but of more than doubtful truth; I don't think liberation is so simple and facile a matter as that. In any case, the transformation which is the object of our yoga would not take place.
       The Purusha above is not only a Witness, he is the giver (or withholder) of the sanction; if he persistently refuses the sanction to a movement of Prakriti, keeping himself detached, then, even if it goes on for a time by its past momentum, it usually loses its hold after a time, becomes more feeble, less persistent, less concrete and in the end fades away. If you take the Purusha consciousness, it should be not only as the Witness but as the Anumanta, refusing sanction to the disturbing movements, sanctioning only peace, calm, purity and whatever else is part of the divine nature. This refusal of sanction need not mean a struggle with the lower Prakriti; it should be a quiet, persistent, detached refusal leaving unsupported, unassented to, without meaning or justification, the contrary action of the nature.

Sri Aurobindo

atmavichar100

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Re: Being Still - Summa Iruthal
« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2013, 08:52:19 AM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha