Author Topic: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:  (Read 35617 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #180 on: June 21, 2013, 10:12:45 AM »

The Jnani  or Jivanmukta:

1.  'A Child and a Jnani are similar in a way.  The interest of the child in things ends with the things.  These leave no impressions
in the child's mind.  The same is the case with the Jnani.'

                                                              - Talks No. 9.

NOTES: Desires are the cause of all our trouble.  We look around this magnificent world of diversity and desire the things
which impress us most, and so do our best to obtain them.  We sacrifice a lot and suffer any amount of inconvenience for the
sake of the desired object till we get it.  Yet our trouble does not end with this acquisition, for new aims and objects rise before
us and lure us into new desires and what we call new needs, for which we have again to exert and again to suffer; and so on
and on endlessly.  Thus we remain bound hand and foot to the world without rest and without satisfaction. But the Jnani,
having cultivated and achieved desirelessness, has not the least interest in the world around him, so that his perceptions
do not leave any impression on his mind.  Even if he evinces an interest in an object it is only one of curiosity, much like that
of a child in its surroundings, which passes away the moment in turns its back on them.

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Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #181 on: June 22, 2013, 10:26:59 AM »

The Jnani or Jivamukta:

2. 'The look of the Jnani has a purifying effect.  Purification cannot be visualized.  Just a piece of coal takes long to be
ignited, a piece of charcoal takes a short time, and a mass of gunpowder is instantaoeusly ignited, so it is with grades
of men coming in contact with Mahatma.

                                                                          - Talks No. 155.

NOTES: This is an answer to a question by an English disciple -- one of the earliest - who has been staying in the Asramam
for three months and has yet been unaware of any spiritual benefit  to himself from it.   The 'grade' of the disciple in question
need not be inferred from this question or this answer.,  For Bhagavan assures us that the process and degree of purification
cannot be assessed easily.  It goes its own quiet way without the direct knowledge of the disciple concerned or anyone else.

This has been the experience of almost each and everyone in this Asramam.  Even on the very threshold of the Supreme
Experience one is likely to be almost unaware of its imminence.  It is small wonder therefore that this disciple's surface
consciousness was not aware of what was going on in depths.  The purification incessantly goes on in the presence of the Master,
irrespective of the degree of impurity which the disciple brings with him.  The difference in time  of attaining Jnana between
one disciple and another lies naturally in the difference in the degrees of impurity which they respectively bring with them,

***

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #182 on: June 23, 2013, 10:38:27 AM »

The Jnani or Jivanmukta:

3. 'Is Maharshi's teaching same as Sankara's?'  The Master answers about Himself. 'Maharshi's teaching is only an expression
of His own experience and realization.  Other finds that it tallies with Sri Sankara's.  A realized man uses his own language.'

                                        - Talk No. 189.

NOTES; This is an autobiographical answer, which may be applicable to most Jnanis.  The peculiarities of Sri Bhagavan's
Realization consist in the unique fact that Realization came to Him when He was still in the prime life and had not yet had
any contact with philosophical or metaphysical elements, either through reading or through human guidance.  He had been
preoccupied with his studies for the Matriculation Examination, when the Realization knocked Him down and clean out of
His studies.  The result was that when later He recounted His experiences in the ordinary language, the learned among the
devotees found them to be identical with Sankara's philosophy.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #183 on: June 24, 2013, 09:22:43 AM »

The Jnani or Jivanmukta:

4. "A Self realized being cannot help benefiting the word. His very existence is the highest good."

                                      - Talk No. 210.

NOTES: This should satisfy those who criticize the Jnani as a useless ascetic, should they be fortunate enough to read it.
The wisdom that flows from his lips and the purity of his life and conduct stand as shining ideals for humanity to emulate,
or aspire for, which no amount of preaching Socialism, Communism and philanthropy can do.  What has all this preaching
created except more antagonism, more divisions,, more jealousy, and thus more hatred in the world.  If these preachers
really mean well and sincere, they should turn into ascetics and become Saints themselves and see the difference between
their old preaching and the good they can do with their holiness and purity by their mere presence.   If they cannot do that,
they should mind their own business, and try to bring peace and good to themselves, before they can stand before the world
and boast of doing good to others.

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Arunachala Siva.   
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #184 on: June 25, 2013, 10:46:28 AM »


The Jnani or Jivanmukta:

5. Speaking of Jnanis who depart from the world without leaving the body behind, like Manikkavachagar, Sri Bhagavan said:
'The gross body is only the concrete form of the subtle stuff -- the mind.  When the mind melts away and blazes forth as light,
the body is consumed in that process.  Nandanar is another whose body disappeared in blazing light.'

An English disciple pointed out that the case of Biblical Elijah whose body disappeared in the same way and wanted to know
if Christ['s body did the same, The Master replied:  'No. Christ's body was left as a corpse, which was at first entombed, whereas
the others did not leave corpses behind.'

                                                                                                   - Talk No. 215.

NOTES: This text should be studied in the light of Sri Bhagavan's Advaitic teachings.

'When the mind melts away and blazes forth as light, the body consumed in that process', is the rationale of the disappearance
of the body of the Siddhanta Jnani at his Maha Samadhi  -- so called death.  This helps us to understand the relation of the mind
to the body on the one hand and o the light to which the quoted sentence refers to the other.  But first we have to observe that
the disintegration of he body takes only through a process of which some Jnanis knows as Siddhas -- no all Jnanis - whose
prarabdha entitles them to it, have the Key.  The benefits of such miraculous performances by some Siddhas consist of creating
tremendous psychological effects on the common people, increasing their faith.  But most Jnanis do not approve of them, because
while they increase the people's devotion, they tend to encourage credulity, superstitions, witchcraft and magic, which they are]
out to combat by teaching the Truth, the whole Truth, and nothing but the Truth.

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Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #185 on: June 26, 2013, 11:18:09 AM »
The Jnani or Jivanmukta:


continues......

6. 'Is there no I-am-the-body' idea for the Jnani?  If, for instance, Sri Bhagavan is bitten by an insect, is there no sensation?'

    Bhagavan:  'There is the sensation and there is also the 'I-am-the-body' idea. The latter is common to both Jnani and the
    ajnani with this difference, that the ajnani thinks 'only body is myself' whereas the Jnani knows 'all this is Self'.  or 'all this
    is Brahman;  if there be pain, let it be. It is also the part of the Self. The Self is perfect.'

    'Now with regards to the actions of the Jnanis, they are only so called, because they are ineffective.  Generally the
    actions get embedded as samskaras in the individual.  That can only be so long as the mind is fertile, as is the case of
    the ajnani.  With a Jnani he mind is only surmised; he has already transcended the mind.  Because of his apparent
    activity the mind has to be inferred in his case, and the mind is not fertile like that of an ajnani.  Hence it is said that the
    Jnani's mind is Brahman.  Brahman is certainly no other than the Jnani's mind.  Vasanas cannot bear fruit in that soil.
    His mind is barren, free from the vasanas etc.,

    'However, since prarabdha is conceded in his case, vasanas also must be supposed to exist.  But they are only vasanas
    for enjoyment, leaving no impressions to be the seeds  for future karma.'
                                             
                                                             Talks No, 383.

NOTES: In this text, we have a full view of the Jnani's state: in pains, in action, in the working out of an old, and the generation
of a new karma, etc.,  It all amounts to this: his perceptions of pain and pleasure and of the world are exactly those of the
ajnani, as it has been discussed in Note 45 of the previous chapter.  He sees other bodies and his own exactly as others see
them, but unlike others, he knows the truth about them.  A peasant who, for the first time goes to a cinema show and sees
the fierce fire raging on the screen, starts screaming and tries to run out of the theatre, taking the fire to be real;  whereas
others sit back in their chairs unconcerned.  This is the exact difference between the Jnani and the ajnani in their perceptions.
Both see the very same sights, yet their knowledge of them vastly differs.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #186 on: June 27, 2013, 10:11:50 AM »
The Jnani or Jivanmukta:

Notes for item 6 continues......

As for the actions of the Jnani they are equally productive  -- often even more so -- as those of the ajnani (the word 'ineffective
in the text is likely to be misinterpreted as qualifying actions, whereas it qualifies for the production of samskaras), but they
are without vasanas, although they appear as if they were.  They resemble Coleridge's wonderful pen picture of 'a painted
ship on a painted ocean', though ship and ocean are real.  The actual ship is there, the actual ocean is there, but there is no
movement in either on account of the curse.  The same are the vasanas of a Jnani which have no impressions on his mind.
The driving force in an action which produces Karma is its motive, which is absent in the Jnani's.  Hence there is no creation of
a new Karma for him.  The actor is there, the action is also there, but the diving force of the action is, in his case, automatic,
being impersonal and vasana-less.  The Srutis compare it to the fried seed which can no longer sprout.  That is why the action
of the Jnani is viewed as inaction.  The Jnani appears to act, and efficiently too, but he is not acting at all.  This is the significance
of inaction in action and action in inaction.  The motiveless mind is Brahman Itself.  This is one of the most revealing statements
of Sri Bhagavan.

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Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #187 on: June 28, 2013, 11:08:02 AM »
The Jnani or Jivanmukta:

7.  'The Sage is characterized by eternal and intense activity.  His stillness is like the apparent stillness of a fast rotating
top.  Its very speed cannot be followed by the eye, and so it appears to be still.  So is the apparent inaction of the Sage.
This must be explained because the people generally mistake his stillness to be inertness. It is not so.'

                                                        -  Talk No 599.

NOTES:  Sri Bhagavan has reasons to explain this truth about the Jnani to the critics of His 'inactive life'.  There is no activity
under the sun which is more intense than that of the Jnani, because he is the plenum, the pure Chaitanya which is the
storehouse of all the energy in the universe.  Thus the critics will do well to reflect before they pass a sentence on the
Jnani's activity or inactivity.

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Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Reflections on Talks - S.S. Cohen:
« Reply #188 on: June 29, 2013, 12:41:06 PM »

continues...

The Jnani or Jivanmukta:

8. 'The Jnani is fully aware that that the true state of Being remains fixed and stationary and that all actions go around  him.
His nature does not change and his state is not affected in the least.  He looks on everything with unconcern and remains
blissful.  He is the true state, the primal, natural state of Being.  There is no difference between the Jnani and the ajnani in
their conduct.  The difference lies only in their angles of vision.'

                                                                      - Talk No. 607.

NOTES: The previous text speaks of the intense activity of the Jnani and the first part of this text says the Being is "fixed."

Action appears as such only in the context of sense perceptions.  In order to perceive, energy is needed, more so if it is
followed by thinking and physical acting.  Where does this energy come from?  Certainly not from outside the pereciver,
thinker and actor, but from inside himself, from his very be-ing.  Thus the Being is the source of all energy, the fullness of
energy, nay, Energy itself.  Therefore the Jnani who is ever aware of this Being,  ever merged in the Being, is himself this
massive Energy.  The Being is said to be inactive, because it is ever changeless, though ever full.  And it is because it is ever
full as the Eternal Consciousness-Energy that the last text compares it to the intensively spinning top which appears  to be
standing stark still.  Thus the Jnani is inactive as the changeless Being, and active as the Infinite Energy itself.  The paradox
is thus resolved.  The activity of sense perceptions in the Jnani remains as an appearance in him, as we have already studied.

Therefore the Jnani is literally Brahman in a physical body, the "the mind is only surmised in a Jnani" (text above).  He
enjoys the senses without being imprisoned in them -- his being only "vasnas for enjoyment."  His life is pure light to his
disciples, an inspiring ideal to the ordinary admirers, a focus of wisdom and peace to the wisdom and peace seekers,
and a silent blessing to the whole world. 

Of Him, Sri Krishna spoke the lines:

'Flee unto Him for shelter with all thy being, O Bharata.  By His Grace thou shalt obtain supreme peace, the everlasting home.'

ending iwth:

'Thus hath wisdom, more secret than secrecy itself, been declared unto thee by Me.  Having reflected on it fully, then
act thou as thou listeth.

(Bhagavad Gita, XVIII, 62-63).


Reflections on Talks - concluded.

Sri Ramanarpanamastu.

Arunachala Siva.