Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 197363 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #825 on: November 22, 2014, 01:28:49 PM »
To see God but not the Self is only to see a projection of the mind.

God is seen by him who sees the Self.

But one who has lost the ego and seen the Self is none other than God.

When scriptures speak of 'seeing the Self' and 'seeing God' what is the truth they have in mind?

How does one see the Self?

How does one see the God?

To see Him is to be consumed by Him.

After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva.

Balaji

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #826 on: November 22, 2014, 02:35:53 PM »
Fate or Free-will, which determines one?s life? Bhagavan enjoins very intense self-effort to win freedom, complete predetermination of smallest events of one?s life, irrelevance of the question itself, and absolute unconditional freedom of the Self, unaffected by both destiny and free-will. The answer depends on whether a person believes himself to be the body, the Self or some something else. We list some quotations of Bhagavan so the reader can find the answer for himself.

"If (as Arjuna was told in the Gita) there is a certain work destined to be done by each and we shall eventually do it however much we do not wish to do it or refuse to do it, is there any free will?"

Bhagavan said, 'It is true that the work meant to be done by us will be done by us. But it is open to us to be free from the joys or pains, pleasant or unpleasant consequences of the work, by not identifying ourselves with the body or that which does the work. If you realize your true nature and know that it is not you that do any work, you will be unaffected by the consequences of whatever work the body may be engaged in according to destiny or past karma or divine plan, however you may call it. You are always free and there is no limitation of that freedom.'

Bhagavan: It does not really rest with a man whether he goes to this place or that or whether he gives up his duties or not. All that happens according to destiny. All the activities that the body is to go through are determined when it first comes into existence. It does not rest with you to accept or reject them. The only freedom you have is to turn your mind inward and renounce activities there

K. M. Jivrajani: Why is it that turning inward alone is left to us and not any outer things?
Bhagavan: If you want to go to fundamentals, you must enquire who you are and find out who it is who has freedom or destiny. Who are you and why did you get this body that has these limitations?
Khanna: Is there destiny? And if what is destined to happen will happen is there any use in prayer or effort or should we just remain idle?

Bhagavan: There are only two ways to conquer destiny or be independent of it. One is to enquire for whom is this destiny and discover that only the ego is bound by destiny and not the Self, and that the ego is nonexistent. The other way is to kill the ego by completely surrendering to the Lord, by realizing one's helplessness and saying all the time : 'Not I but Thou, oh Lord!', and giving up all sense of 'I' and 'mine' and leaving it to the Lord to do what he likes with you. Surrender can never be regarded as complete so long as the devotee wants this or that from the Lord. True surrender is love of God for the sake of love and nothing else, not even for the sake of salvation. In other words, complete effacement of the ego is necessary to conquer destiny, whether you achieve this effacement through Self enquiry or through path of devotion.
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #827 on: November 22, 2014, 06:58:45 PM »
One morning Sri Bhagavan said: 'one cannot correctly carry out an act just by merely seeing or hearing about it. Slip up does happen occasionally even in a trivial little act, despite having done it correctly on a continual basis. Such being the case with ordinary deeds, (even more) so knowing occasionally 'I am Atma' or hearing it from the guru alone one cannot realize the Self.'
He is pointing to the verse no. 6 of upadesa undiyar:
"Continuous meditation is better than interrupted meditation
Like the flow of a stream, like the flow of oil."

Sri Annamalai swami's diary -Entry no.35
« Last Edit: November 22, 2014, 10:22:10 PM by Ravi.N »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #828 on: November 24, 2014, 12:52:17 PM »
Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings:

The path of Self inquiry is to hold on to the 'I', transcending all the different states of experience. To be -
to remain as the unchanging 'I' at all times -- Sri Ramana Maharshi said, is to be the Truth.  There is no  Truth
apart from Being. To achieve that, intuitive analysis of one's own experience of waking, dream and deep sleep is
essential.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #829 on: November 24, 2014, 01:36:53 PM »
God is always the first person, the I, ever standing before you.  Because you give precedence to worldly things, God appears
to have receded to the background.  If you give up all else and seek Him alone, He will remain as the I, the Self.   You cannot
by any means escape the Self. You want to see God in all, but not in yourself?  If all is God, are you not included in that all?

To see God is to be God.  There is no 'all' apart from God for Him to pervade.  He alone IS.

After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #830 on: November 25, 2014, 01:11:34 PM »
Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings:

It is into our real nature or the Self that the 'I' or the 'I' thought merges in deep sleep and again comes out daily on waking,
since it is its Source.  Scriptures too declare that the first name of God is 'I' !  It is very essential that we observe the 'I'-
thought closely since it is the only link between the body and the Self, spoken of as hidden within us by the scriptures.
We can do so by paying full attention to it and whence it arises.  All the time one's attention should unwaveringly be directed
to the feeling of 'I' or 'I' thought.  How?  When thoughts arise pose the question, 'For whom is this thought?' The answer is
'For me'. Then ask 'Who am I?' Such questioning brings one's full attention on the 'I'. There is no answer to the question
'Who am I?'  The keen attention leads one to one's Source, which is pure Silence.  Focusing one's attention on oneself is the
sole effort one has to put forth to find out one's own Truth.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.
   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #831 on: November 25, 2014, 01:46:04 PM »
The eternal, unbroken, natural state of abiding in the Self is Jnanam.

To abide in the Self you must love the Self.


Since God is verily the Self, love of the Self is love of God; and that is Bhakti.

Jnana and Bhakti are thus one and the same.

Whether you meditate on God or on the Self is immaterial; the goal is the same.

All kinds of thoughts  arise in meditation - unless they rise up, how can they be destroyed?  They rise up spontaneously
in order to be extinguished in due course.

Thoughts are Vasanas accumulated in innumerable previous births. Their annihilation is the aim.

Atman, the Self is realized with mruta manas (dead mind) i.e. the mind devoid of thoughts and turned inward. Then
the mind sees its own source and becomes That.

After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva. 

Pythagoras

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #832 on: November 26, 2014, 03:39:03 AM »
Hi all, I have some questions:

In one of Bhagavan's response he says:
"You say 'Who am I?' becomes a japa. It is not meant that you should go on asking 'Who am I?" in that case, thoughts will not so easily die. In the direct method, as you call it, in asking yourself 'Who am I?', you are told so to concentrate within yourself where the 'I'-thoughts."

So what does he mean exactly hold on to the I-thought? I understand the I-thoughts are thoughts but what does he mean to hold on to them? For example if a thought pops up that you want to go outside or chase some desire. Do you hold on to that thought? How so? Do you just hold that image in your head?

Also what does he mean by 'I, I'? Why are there 2 'I's'?

Next question is when he said:

"If by saying 'I do not love this, I do not love that,' you reject all things, that which remains is swarupa, that is the real form of the Self. that is pure bliss. Call it pure bliss, God, atma, or what you will. That is devotion, that is realization and that is everything."

I find it a little contradicting because isn't that neti-neti? He says that is not how you do neti-neti but he also says when can also reject thoughts at first.

Hopefully someone can help clear this up for me  :P

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #833 on: November 26, 2014, 12:48:48 PM »
Bhagavan Ramana Teachings:

Sage Vasishta enlightened Lord Rama: 'Shining in every body as 'I'-'I'' - is nothing but the Self on which one has to meditate....
With the stick of inquiry strike the fierce-looking mind and snake like senses, and make them abide in the Heart (the Source).'

The Self, the Truth, the Silence, the Happiness, the Source that one seeks to know is thus verily oneself.

"If one inquires as to who  one is and what one is, and finds out the Truth, one becomes oneself.' says Bhagavan Ramana
in Letters from Sri Ramanasramam. 

When a devotee once put a question to the Maharshi as to what he should do to master this science of the Self, Sri
Bhagavan with a benign smile, answered: 'Be as you ARE.'

V.Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.         
« Last Edit: November 26, 2014, 01:11:44 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #834 on: November 26, 2014, 12:59:58 PM »
Dear Pythagoras,

1. Who am I? is not a mantra, in the sense, by merely repeating Who am I?, like Rama, Rama or Siva, Siva, one will not attain
the Atma, Self.

2. Who am I? is essentially a question to ask who you are and find out your real nature.  That is, The answer would come ax,
'I am this, or that.' Now, you are not this or that, you are merely 'I'. Then when this I is further contemplated upon, it will
take you to the Heart, the Source, Self.   By  'I thought' what Sri Bhagavan means is: This is the first thought; this will lead
you to many thoughts, like I am good, he is bad, she is beautiful, she is wicked etc., etc., These thoughts will spread endlessly
like the water circles when you throw a stone on water tank. The idea is to curb these endless thoughts and remain as I.

3. The I (Naan in Tamizh) goes to the source that is the Heart, you will 'experience the dancing of the Self, I-I, I am the
Self, I am the Self.  Now you may ask, "when the Self is non moving, how can It dance?"  The answer is that the Self
will shine in all brilliance and so it is said to dance.  Like the twinkling star that you see is seen moving, because of its
twinkling.

4. Up to certain point, Bhagavan's method is neti neti i.e only upto the point you negate I am not this, I am not that.'
Thereafter it is simple Silence.

Arunachala Siva.               

« Last Edit: November 26, 2014, 01:05:08 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #835 on: November 26, 2014, 01:10:58 PM »
But he who thinks, raises troubles.  The real 'I' is silent.  Thoughts are the enemy.

Thoughts amount to creation of the Universe.  In their absence, there is neither world nor God the Creator.

Give up thoughts and you need not give up anything else.

Thoughts alone make up the mind. Of all thoughts , the 'I'-thought is the root. What is called the mind is but the notion 'I'

When one turns within and searches whence the 'I' thought arises, the 'I' vanishes and wisdom's quest begins.

After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #836 on: November 27, 2014, 12:32:13 PM »
Because of the emergence of thoughts, we surmise something from which they start.  That we term mind.

But what is mind?

The mind is only a bundle of thoughts. Thoughts arise because there is a thinker.  The thinker is the Ego.  The ego is the root
thought from which all the other thoughts arise.  If sought, it will vanish automatically.

Destroy the power of mind by seeking it.  When the mind is examined, its activities cease.

After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #837 on: November 27, 2014, 12:41:09 PM »
'To tread the path of Self Knowledge is like walking on a razor's edge.'  This famous statement of the scriptures is often quoted
by those who give religious discourses in order to warn and frighten the seekers who long to turn to the practice of spirituality.

But Bhagavan emphatically asserts:

'Self Knowledge is an easy thing.
The easiest thing there is.;

Is it easy or difficult?

It is both!

It is the most difficult as long as you cling to your mind and its dictates, Or, rather, if you depend on the mind, to help
take you to the region of Self Knowledge; it is incapable of doing it!

Rather, we must reject the mind, ignore its many tongued voices and transcend its limits by turning within:

With the mind you are far, far away from Self Knowledge, unreachable by the mind.

Without mind, you are already That!

So its easiness or 'most difficultness depends on You.  By itself, it is both easy and difficult.

Bhagavan Ramana Teachings.

V, Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #838 on: November 28, 2014, 12:09:54 PM »
There are five elements:  earth, water, fire, air, and ether.  Of these, earth is the grossest element.  You can see it, touch it,
taste it, feel it, hold it, and smell it.  Next is water. It is subtler than earth.  Fire is still subtler than water.  Air is much subtler -
so subtle that you can only feel it on your body; you can neither see nor hold it.  Ether is the most subtle of all.  All  you can
neither see nor even feel it!  So subtle is it that we must only accept that it is there as the all pervading element.

The elements, in their gradations, become ever subtler until ether is reached, an element which we can only admit exists,
but cannot tangibly prove.  Thus the subtlest among the elements is ether.

Can you imagine?  Mind is far subtler than ether, say the Vedas!

Bhagavan Ramana Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #839 on: November 28, 2014, 12:15:10 PM »
But if you go the way of your thoughts, you will be carried away by them and you will find yourself in an endless maze.

As thoughts arise, they should be destroyed then and there in the very place of their origin.  through inquiry.

Who am I? will destroy all other thoughts, and like the stick used for stirring the burning pyre, it will itself be destroyed
in the end.  As long as there are impressions of objects in the mind, so long is the inquiry 'Who am I?' to sally forth;
but if they are destroyed as they emerge, the fortress will into our hands.


After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva.