Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 197436 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #810 on: November 12, 2014, 02:12:23 PM »
Nature is that which is -- that which exists.  To elaborate, we may divide it into objective and subjective nature.  That which
perceives is subjective nature and that which is perceived is objective nature.

In the waking state the world exists, the world is perceived.  Nature as the world is objective nature and the one who perceives
that world is subjective nature.  In the waking state, both exist.  In deep sleep both cease. In the dream state, both objective
and subjective natures remain, but in a totally different dimension. 

According to an oft quoted Tamizh saying, the essence of Nature is 'the destruction of the old and re emergence of the new.' Nature
is always changing yet remains eternally  the same.  Like a river, -- or time itself -- ever flowing yet undeniably  present in the spaciousness of the moment   .

The Tirumandiram of Tiru Moolar says, 'Nature is in a flux, every moment, changes continue to take place. The author saint
of this ancient Tamizh classic calls this modification Vibhuti (sacred ashes). He likens the perceiver to Lord Siva and the
perceived to Vibhuti.  The Lord is the Seer , smeared all over with the seen - Vibhuti.  Eternal changlessness hidden in the
ever changing!

If the perceived is an ever changing flow, does it not imply that the perceiver is changelss?

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.       

Jewell

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #811 on: November 12, 2014, 11:40:08 PM »

Q:Is the state of 'being still' a state involving effort or
effortlessness?


B:It is not an effortless state of indolence. All mundane
activities which are ordinarily called effort are performed with
the aid of a portion of the mind and with frequent breaks. But
the act of communion with the Self (atma vyavahara) or
remaining still inwardly is intense activity which is performed
with the entire mind and without break.

Maya (delusion or ignorance) which cannot be destroyed
by any other act is completely destroyed by this intense activity
which is called 'silence' (mauna).

Q: What is the nature of maya?

B:Maya  is that which makes us regard as nonexistent the Self,
the Reality, which is always and everywhere present, all-
pervasive and Self-luminous, and as existent the individual soul
(jiva), the world (jagat), and God (para) which have been
conclusively proved to be nonexistent at all times and places.

Q:Why do thoughts of many objects arise in the mind even
when there is no contact with external objects?


B:All such thoughts are due to latent tendencies (purva
samskaras). They appear only to the individual consciousness
(jiva) which has forgotten its real nature and become
externalised. Whenever particular things are perceived, the
enquiry `Who is it that sees them?' should be made; they will
then disappear at once.

Q:How do the triple factors (i.e., knower, known and
knowledge), which are absent in deep sleep, samadhi,
etc., manifest themselves in the Self (in the states of waking
and dreaming)?


B:From the Self there arise in succession:

(i) Chidabhasa (reflected consciousness) which is a kind
of luminosity.


(ii) Jiva (the individual consciousness) or the seer or the
first concept.


(iii) Phenomena, that is the world.

Q:Since the Self is free from the notions of knowledge
and ignorance how can it be said to pervade the entire
body in the shape of sentience or to impart sentience to
the senses?


B:Wise men say that there is a connection between the source
of the various psychic nerves and the Self, that this is the knot
of the Heart, that the connection between the sentient and the
insentient will exist until this is cut asunder with the aid of
true knowledge, that just as the subtle and invisible force of
electricity travels through wires and does many wonderful
things, so the force of the Self also travels through the psychic
nerves and, pervading the entire body, imparts sentience to
the senses, and that if this knot is cut, the Self will remain as
it always is, without any attributes.

Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi
Collected Works

« Last Edit: November 13, 2014, 12:51:14 AM by Jewell »

Jewell

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #812 on: November 12, 2014, 11:51:37 PM »

Q:What is the significance of the saying that the nature of
the real Guru is that of the Supreme Lord (Sarveshwara)?

Bhagavan:In the case of the individual soul, which desires to attain
the state of true knowledge or the state of Godhood (Ishwara)
and with that object always practises devotion, the Lord who
is the witness of that individual soul and identical with it,
comes forth, when the individual's devotion has reached a
mature stage, in human form with the help of sat-chit-ananda.
These three natural features, and form and name which he
also graciously assumes, and in the guise of blessing the
disciple, absorbs him in Himself. According to this doctrine
the Guru can truly be called the Lord.


Q:What is the end of devotion (bhakti) and the path of
Siddhanta (i.e., Saiva Siddhanta)?

B:It is to learn the truth that all one's actions performed with
unselfish devotion, with the aid of the three purified
instruments (body, speech and mind), in the capacity of the
servant of the Lord, become the Lord's actions, and to stand
forth free from the sense of 'I' and 'mine'. This is also the
truth of what the Saiva Siddhantins call parabhakti (supreme
devotion) or living in the service of God (irai-pani-nittral).


Q: What is the end of the path of knowledge (jnana) or
Vedanta?

B:It is to know the truth that the 'I' is not different from the
Lord (Ishwara) and to be free from the feeling of being the
doer (kartritva, ahamkara).


Q:How can it be said that the end of both these paths is the
same?

B:Whatever the means, the destruction of the sense 'I' and
'mine' is the goal, and as these are interdependent, the
destruction of either of them causes the destruction of the
other; therefore in order to achieve that state of silence which
is beyond thought and word, either the path of knowledge
which removes the sense of 'I' or the path of devotion which
removes the sense of 'mine', will suffice. So there is no doubt
that the end of the paths of devotion and knowledge is one
and the same.


Note: So long as the 'I' exists it is necessary to accept the
Lord also. If any one wishes to regain easily the supreme state
of identity (sayujya) now lost to him, it is only proper that he
should accept this conclusion.


 Q:What is the mark of the ego?

B:The individual soul of the form of 'I' is the ego. The Self
which is of the nature of intelligence (chit) has no sense
of 'I'. Nor does the insentient body possess a sense of 'I'.
The mysterious appearance of a delusive ego between
the intelligent and the insentient, being the root cause of
all these troubles, upon its destruction by whatever means,
that which really exists will be seen as it is. This is called
liberation (moksha).

Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi
Collected works


Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #813 on: November 14, 2014, 10:41:30 AM »
Viewed from another perspective, Nature again has two aspects.  One is static and the other is dynamic -- achala and
chala.  All that moves, moves in space which is unmoving, sthira tattva.

Arunachala is that absolute immovable principle, says Bhagavan, around which all movements (chalana) revolve and
into which all finally merge.  Agitation attains stillness in its very proximity, like iron filings which dance only to cling
immovably to the magnet, itself actionless. Bhagavan says in Arunachala Ashtakam, 'I was drawn to Arunachala, and
nearing it, I saw it as the Unmoving!'

All creation is made up of the five elements, -- the earth, water, fire, air and ether and all that move and move not  are only
the combination of these five elements. Bhagavan addressing Arunachala, says, 'The five elements, all living beings and
the vast expanse of the universe are nothing but You alone."  (Arunachala Padigam)

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #814 on: November 15, 2014, 12:28:42 PM »
What is the basis, the ground for these five elements?  The Puranas state that Siva, the One, created Sakti, His Consort,
the Second, and then all of creation was brought forth.  Siva, the static aspect, creating Sakti, the dynamic aspect,
followed by the entire process of evolution.

The process of involution, vice versa, is movement (Sakti) merging into stillness (Siva).  That is the story of the Mother
Goddess, after arduous tapas, attaining union with her Lord Arunachaleswara, related in the Arunachala Mahatmyam.

This process of evolution and involution is taking place every moment of the day.  A mighty tree grown from a tiny
seed gives fruit and dies, yet springs from the seed again. The process goes on.  This is the same for all living beings.

Why? What are exactly does all this begin?   Where does it end?  Objectively, scientifically all these questions remain
unanswered. But spiritually, each one of us carries the answer within ourselves.

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #815 on: November 16, 2014, 03:17:59 PM »
Nature's gits to the man, the basic experiences of everyday life -- the three states of waking, dream and deep sleep --
contain the clues to the mystery of Nature's operation.  The root of five elements, of static and dynamic principles,
is know if these three states of being are carefully analyzed and the truth experientially realized.

Sleep is blessed  relief from the 'slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.'  In deep sleep, the whole world is dissolved
along with the perceiver (that is, for everyone of us, individually). There is nothing. Upon waking, consciousness of
being, then, identification with one's body arises, followed by myriad circumstances and relationships.

Sages affirm that 'as above, so below' -- 'what is contained in the macrocosm is contained in the microcosm.' In the act
of experiencing the waking and sleep states, man daily enacts the drama of evolution and involution.

contd.,

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #816 on: November 17, 2014, 12:44:25 PM »
The act of dreaming is indicative of the fact  that each one of us is invested with this tremendous power of creation and
dissolution. The whole gamut of activities, entities, joys and sorrows experienced in the dream state is the sole creation
of a single dreamer.

The waking perceiver, too is similarly responsible for his waking world.

The scriptures further state that just as the content of dreams is unreal, to the waking mind, objective nature as perceived
in the waking state. together with the subjective perceiver, is unreal from the ultimate view point of Self Realization.

So, the ground of Nature, both objective and subjective, is rooted in one's own Awareness, which houses projects, nourishes
and swallows up all of creation. This Awareness is the substratum of the waking, dream,  and deep sleep states.  Bhagavan
calls this Awareness the 'Self', 'the Heart'.

In one steps out of the grip of these various states and remains in Awareness per se, the truth of Nature is revealed.
This revelation takes place in Silence, -- the innermost core of each being.

In this Silence one realizes that Nature is simply ananda, eternal joy, compassion, pure intelligence, 'choiceless awareness'
and It shines as such everywhere.

Bhagavan Ramana Teachings,

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.               
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #817 on: November 18, 2014, 03:19:00 PM »
Sri Venkateswara Sarma was an astoundingly exceptional astrologer.  He was a genius from childhood. His extraordinary
intelligence enabled him to master the most and abstruse and difficult branch of astrology - Prasna - even at a very tender
age. He was acclaimed as the wisest student by his guru. Prasna is an asrological science based on, and also a perfect fruition
of, mathematics and intuition.

During that period, he heard for the first time about Sri Ramana Maharshi. He saw Bhagavan's picture and felt the pull
towards Him very powerfully.  He went to Arunachala and climbed the Hill to Skandasramam, the abode of Bhagavan at that
time. The very first look that Bhagavan gave, instantly made Sastrigal His slave. He had a strong desire to stay with the
Maharshi, permanently, renouncing everything he had held dear.  Yet, there was this one attraction of his science of astrology
and it was distracting him.  There was a dilemma and that disturbed him.

One day he mustered courage, approached the Maharshi and in all humility, yet with full conviction, he put the following
question: 'Bhagavan! Is not astrology the best and most accurate of all sciences?'

Bhagavan looked at him intently for sometime, in silence. Then slowly but firmly, He replied, 'The science of Self is superior
to all other sciences.' Sastrigal was at the height of his career. Yet, these conclusive words from Bhagavan gave him the total
conviction to renounce his lucrative position the same day and pursue the science of the Self. His wife too fully agreed with him
and the rest of their lives they lived in utter poverty at the holy feet of the Sadguru, under the protective shade of sacred Hill,
Arunachala!

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #818 on: November 19, 2014, 12:12:18 PM »
To know oneself, as one really is, denuded of all that is artificial, impermanent,, and hence unreal, is not only possible
and desirable -- in that it solves all man's problems and allows him to abide in his true nature, which is peace, stillness,
and happiness -- it is a total science, a perfect science and hence naturally superior to physics, astronomy, mathematics,
chemistry and all other sciences.  It is a 'total' science because it alone of all sciences, goes into the nature of the very one
who comprehends or deduces all other sciences.

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #819 on: November 19, 2014, 01:32:49 PM »
The 'I' casts off the illusion of 'I' and yet remains as 'I'.

Such is the paradox of Self Realization.

Take the case of Bhakti.  I approach Iswara and pray to be absorbed in Him. I then surrender myself in faith.
What remains afterwards?  In place of original 'I' perfect surrender leaves a residuum of God in which the 'I' is lost.
This is the highest form of devotion and surrender.

Source: After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva.   
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #820 on: November 20, 2014, 01:48:00 PM »
Each one of us longs ever to be happy, untainted by sorrow. Also, one can seek only that which is known already. It is
quite evident that one has the greatest love for oneself only. Can it not thus be derived that happiness is one's real nature?
And that is the reason why one only loves oneself deeply? So it is essential that one should know oneself to realize that
inherent and untainted happiness which surges from within.  For obtaining such Self Knowledge the inquiry Who am I?,
the quest for the Self is the best means, says Bhagavan Ramana.

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #821 on: November 20, 2014, 02:38:54 PM »
Thus there is a state beyond effort and effortlessness. Until it is realized, effort is necessary. After tasting such a bliss even once,
one will repeatedly try to regain it.  Effort is meant as a way, not to allow oneself to be distracted by thoughts. Having
once experienced the Bliss of Peace, one will not engage oneself otherwise. It is as difficult for a Jnani to engage in thoughts
as it is for an ajnani to be free from thought.

After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #822 on: November 21, 2014, 01:37:45 PM »
To discover the truth about oneself, Sri Ramana said, 'one has do delve within and seek the source of all one's
activities. If the Truth is not within oneself, He said, then the Truth cannot be found outside. To drive home this vital
point, Ramana Maharshi never indulged in jargon or polemics.  He referred to one's own daily experiences. No one can
say, I 'do not exist', 'I don't know what is sleep, dream, hunger or thirst', and so on.  By drawing one's attention
to such common experiences, He made one realize that one is nothing but Truth.

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #823 on: November 21, 2014, 02:41:25 PM »
Truly there is no cause for you to be miserable and unhappy.  You yourself impose limitations on your true nature of
Infinite Being, and then weep that you are but a finite creature. 

Then you take up this or that Sadhana to transcend the non existent limitations.  But if your Sadhana itself assumes the existence
of such limitations, how can it help you to transcend them?

Hence I say, know that you are really infinite, pure Being -- the Self absolute.

The only way to be rid of your grief is to know and be the Self. How can this be unattainable?

After the Rain.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #824 on: November 22, 2014, 12:46:07 PM »
Everyone refers to himself as 'I' only.  The entire population, millions and millions, all the time says, referring to each to
themselves, 'I' only 'I'. Are there so many millions of 'I's? Conversely, there is only one 'I' by which countless number
of bodies are referred to!  Is it not strange that the mind boggling multiplicity is reduced to one single syllable!  Yes. the
'I' is a symbol which stands for something immeasurably vaster and wider than itself.

Bhagavan Ramana's Teachings.

V. Ganesan.

Arunachala Siva.