Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 197413 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #645 on: January 26, 2014, 10:33:19 AM »
Vichara Sanghraham:

Chapter III:

The World:

Creation:  The main purpose of the scriptures is to expose the illusory nature of the world and to reveal the Supreme
Spirit as the only Reality,  They have built up the theory of creation with this sole end in view.  They even go into details
and entertain the lowest order of seekers with the narration of the successive appearance of the Spirit, of the disequlibrium
of reflected consciousness , of the fundamentals of elements, of the world, of the body, of life, and so on.  But for the highest
order of seekers the scriptures would say, in short, that the whole world appears like a panorama in a dream with an
apparent objectivity and independent existence due to ignorance of the Self and consequent obsession with obtrusive
thoughts,  They seek to show the world as an illusion in order to reveal the Truth.  Those who have realized the Self by
direct and immediate experience clearly perceive beyond all doubt that the phenomenal world   as an objective, independent
reality is wholly non existent. 

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #646 on: January 27, 2014, 10:41:56 AM »
Vichara Sanghraham:

Chapter IiII:

The World:

Discrimination between the Seer and the Seen:

Object seen: insentient                                          The seer: sentient

The body, a pot etc.,                                               the eye

The eye                                                                   the optic nerve center in the brain.

The optic nerve center                                            the mind

The mind                                                                 the individual self or ego.

The individual self                                                    Pure Consciousness

Since the Self, which is pure Consciousness, cognizes everything, as stated in the classification above, it is the ultimate
Seer.  All the rest: the ego, mind etc., are merely its objects.  The subject in one line becomes the object in the next;
so each one of them except the Self or Pure Consciousness is a merely externalized object and cannot be the true Seer.
Since the Self cannot be objectified, not being cognized by anything else, and since the Self is the Seer seeing all else,
the subject-object relation and the apparent subjectivity of the Self exist only on the plane of relativity and vanish in the
Absolute.  There is in truth no other than the Self, which is neither the seer, not the seen, and is not involved, as subject
or object.

Chapter III - concluded.

Arunachala Siva.                                                                                   

Balaji

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #647 on: February 05, 2014, 11:56:16 AM »
Sri Ramana Maharshi - The Essence of Instruction (Upadesa Saram)



(Translated by Prof. K. Swaminathan)


1.  Action yields fruit,
For so the Lord ordains it.
How can action be the Lord?
It is insentient.

2.  The fruit of action passes.
But action leaves behind
Seed of further action
Leading to an endless ocean of action;
Not at all to moksha.

3.  Disinterested action
Surrendered to the Lord
Purifies the mind and points
The way to moksha.


4.  This is certain:
Worship, praise and meditation,
Being work of body, speech and mind,
Are steps for orderly ascent.

5.  Ether, fire, air, water, earth,
Sun, moon, and living beings --
Worship of these,
Regarded all as forms of His,
Is perfect worship of the Lord.

6.  Better than hymns of praise
Is repetition of the Name;
Better low-voiced than loud,
But best of all
Is meditation in the mind.

7.  Better than spells of meditation
Is one continuous current,
Steady as a stream,
Or downward flow of oil.

8.  Better than viewing Him as Other,
Indeed the noblest attitude of all,
Is to hold Him as the `I' within,
The very `I'.

9.  Abidance in pure being
Transcending thought through love intense
Is the very essence
Of supreme devotion.

10.  Absorption in the Heart of being,
Whence we sprang,
Is the path of action, of devotion,
Of union and of knowledge.

11.  Holding the breath controls the mind,
Like a bird caught in a net.
Breath-regulation helps
Absorption in the Heart.

12.  Mind and breath (as thought and action)
Fork out like two branches.
But both spring
From a single root.

13.  Absorption is of two sorts:
Submergence and destruction.
Mind submerged rises again;
Dead, it revives no more.

14.  Breath controlled and thought restrained,
The mind turned one-way inward
Fades and dies.

15.  Mind extinct, the mighty seer
Returns to his own natural being
And has no action to perform.

16.  It is true wisdom
For the mind to turn away
From outer objects and behold
Its own effulgent form.

17.  When unceasingly the mind
Scans its own form,
There is nothing of the kind.
For everyone
This path direct is open.

18.  Thoughts alone make up the mind;
And of all thoughts the `I' thought is the root.
What is called mind is but the notion `I'.

19.  When one turns within and searches
Whence this `I' thought arises,
The shamed `I' vanishes
And wisdom's quest begins.

20.  Where this `I' notion fades,
Now there as I, as I, arises
The One, the very Self, The Infinite.

21.  Of the term, `I' the permanent import
Is `That'. For even in deep sleep
Where we have no sense of `I'
We do not cease to be.

22.  Body, senses, mind, breath, sleep --
All insentient and unreal --
Cannot be `I',
`I' who am the Real.

23.  For knowing That which Is
There is no other knower.
Hence Being is Awareness
And we are all Awareness.

24.  In the nature of their being, creature and creator
Are in substance one.
They differ only
In adjuncts and awareness.

25.  Seeing oneself free of all attributes
Is to see the Lord,
For He shines ever as the pure Self.

26.  To know the Self is but to be the Self,
For It is non-dual.
In such knowledge
One abides as That.

27.  That is true knowledge which transcends
Both knowledge and ignorance,
For in pure knowledge
There is no object to be known.

28.  Having known one's nature one abides
As being with no beginning and no end
In unbroken consciousness and bliss.

29.  Abiding in this state of bliss
Beyond bondage and release,
Is steadfastness
In service of the Lord.

30.  All ego gone,
Living as That alone
Is penance good for growth,
Sings Ramana, the Self.



from fb
« Last Edit: February 05, 2014, 11:58:05 AM by Balaji »
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #648 on: March 23, 2014, 03:17:02 PM »
Talk 643.

An elderly, learned Andhra asked: "Are the two methods Karma marga and jnana marga separate and independent of each other? Or is the Karma marga only a preliminary which after successful practice should be followed by jnana marga for the consummation of the aim? The Karma advocates non-attachment to action and yet an active life, whereas the jnana means renunciation. What is the true meaning of renunciation? Subjugation of lust, passion, greed, etc., is common to all and forms the essential preliminary step for any course. Does not freedom from passions indicate renunciation? Or is renunciation different, meaning cessation of the active life? These questions are troubling me and I beg lights to be thrown on those doubts."

Bhagavan smiled and said: You have said all. Your question contains the answer also. Freedom from passions is the essential requisite. When that is accomplished all else is accomplished.
D.: Sri Sankara emphasises the jnana marga and renunciation as preliminary to it. But there are clearly two methods dwividha mentioned in the Gita. They are Karma and Jnana (Lokesmin dwividha nishtha...).
M.: Sri Acharya has commented on the Gita and on that passage also.
D.: The Gita seems to emphasise Karma. For Arjuna is persuaded to fight; Sri Krishna Himself set the example by an active life of great exploits.
M.: The Gita starts saying that you are not the body, that you are not therefore the karta.
D.: What is the significance?
M.: That one should act without thinking that oneself is the actor. The actions go on despite his egolessness. The person has come into manifestation for a certain purpose. That purpose will be accomplished whether he considers himself the actor or not.
D.: What is Karma yoga? Is it non-attachment to Karma or its fruit?
M.: Karma yoga is that yoga in which the person does not arrogate to himself the function of being the actor. The actions go on automatically.
D.: Is it the non-attachment to the fruits of actions?
M.: The question arises only if there is the actor. It is being all along said that you should not consider yourself the actor.
D.: So Karma yoga is kartrtva buddhi rahita karma - action without the sense of doership.
M.: Yes. Quite so.
D.: The Gita teaches active life from beginning to end.
M.: Yes, the actor-less action.
D.: Is it then necessary to leave the home and lead a life of renunciation?
M.: Is the home in you? Or are you in the home?
D.: It is in my mind.
M.: Then what becomes of you when you leave the physical environment?
D.: Now I see. Renunciation is only action without the sense of being the karta. Is there not action for a jivanmukta?
M.: Who raises the question? Is he a jivanmukta or another?
D.: Not a jivanmukta.
M.: Let the question be raised after jivanmukti is gained if it is found necessary. Mukti is admitted to be freedom from the mental activities also. Can a mukta think of action?
D.: Even if he gives up the action, the action will not leave him. Is it not so?
M.: With what is he identified in order that this question might apply?
D.: Yes, I see all right. My doubts are now cleared.

Talks with Sri Ramana maharshi
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 03:43:07 PM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #649 on: March 24, 2014, 07:51:41 PM »
Talk 273.

Dr. Syed asked: I have been reading the Five Hymns. I find that the hymns are addressed to Arunachala by you. You are an Advaitin. How do you then address God as a separate Being?
M.: The devotee, God and the Hymns are all the Self.
D.: But you are addressing God. You are specifying this Arunachala Hill as God.
M.: You can identify the Self with the body. Should not the devotee identify the Self with Arunachala?
D.: If Arunachala be the Self why should it be specially picked out among so many other hills? God is everywhere. Why do you specify Him as Arunachala?
M.: What has attracted you from Allahabad to this place? What has attracted all these people around?
D.: Sri Bhagavan.
M.: How was I attracted here? By Arunachala. The Power cannot be denied. Again Arunachala is within and not without. The Self is Arunachala.

Talks with Sri Ramana maharshi

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #650 on: April 28, 2014, 10:31:09 PM »
Talk 157

M:Grace is in the beginning, middle and end. Grace is the Self. Because of the false identification of the Self with the body the Guru is considered to be with body. But from the Guru?s outlook the Guru is only the Self. The Self is one only. He tells that the Self alone is. Is not then the Self your Guru? Where else will Grace come from? It is from the Self alone. Manifestation of the Self is a manifestation of Grace and vice versa. All these doubts arise because of the wrong outlook and consequent expectation of things external to oneself. Nothing is external to the Self.

Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #651 on: May 25, 2014, 09:30:46 AM »
D.: Seeking the 'I' there is nothing to be seen.
M.: Because you are accustomed to identify yourself with the body and sight with the eyes, therefore, you say you do not see anything. What is there to be seen? Who is to see? How to see? There is only one consciousness which, manifesting as 'I-thought', identifies itself with the body, projects itself through the eyes and sees the objects around. The individual is limited in the waking state and expects to see something different. The evidence of his senses will be the seal of authority. But he will not admit that the seer, the seen and the sight are all manifestations of the same consciousness - namely, 'I-I'. Contemplation helps one to overcome the illusion that the Self
must be visual. In truth, there is nothing visual. How do you feel the 'I' now? Do you hold a mirror before you to know your own being? The awareness is the 'I'. Realise it and that is the truth.
D.: On enquiry into the origin of thoughts there is a perception of ?I?. But it does not satisfy me.
M.: Quite right. The perception of 'I' is associated with a form, maybe the body. There should be nothing associated with the pure Self. The Self is the unassociated, pure Reality, in whose light, the body, the ego, etc. shine. On stilling all thoughts the pure consciousness remains over. Just on waking from sleep and before becoming aware of the world there is that pure 'I-I'. Hold to it without sleeping or without allowing thoughts to possess you. If that is held firm it does not matter even though the world is seen. The seer remains unaffected by the phenomena.

Excerpt from Talk 196,Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi
« Last Edit: May 25, 2014, 09:53:35 AM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #652 on: May 25, 2014, 10:11:54 AM »
Talk 208
It is enough that one surrenders oneself. Surrender is to give oneself up to the original cause of one's being. Do not delude yourself by imagining such source to be some God outside you. One's source is within yourself. Give yourself up to it. That means that you should seek the source and merge in it. Because you imagine yourself to be out of it, you raise the question 'Where is the source?' Some contend that the sugar cannot taste its own sweetness and that a taster must taste and enjoy it. Similarly, an individual cannot be the Supreme and enjoy the Bliss of that state; therefore the individuality must be maintained on the one hand and God-head on the other so that enjoyment may result! Is God insentient like sugar? How can one surrender oneself and yet retain one's individuality for supreme enjoyment? Furthermore they say also
that the soul, reaching the divine region and remaining there, serves the Supreme Being. Can the sound of the word 'service' deceive the Lord? Does He not know? Is He waiting for these people's service? Would not He - the Pure Consciousness - ask in turn: 'Who are you apart from Me that presume to serve Me'?
Still more, they assume that the individual soul becomes pure by being divested of the ego and fit for being the body of the Lord. Thus the Lord is the Spirit and the purified souls constitute His body and limbs! Can there be a soul for the souls? How many souls are there? The answer must be, 'There are many individual souls and One Supreme Soul.' What is soul in that case? It cannot be the body, etc. What remains over after all these are eliminated must be said to be the soul. Thus even after realising the soul as that which cannot be discarded, the Supreme Soul must be known to exist. In that case, how was the soul realised to be the ultimate reality after discarding all that was alien to it? Should this be right, the soul which was described as that inalienable reality is not the true soul. All such confusion is due to the
word 'soul' (atma). The same word atma is used to signify the body, the senses, the mind, the vital principle, the individual soul and the Supreme Being. This wide application of the word has given rise to the idea that the individual soul (jivatma), goes to constitute the body of the Supreme (Paramatma). 'I, O Arjuna! am the Self, seated in the heart of all beings; ...' (Bhagavad Gita, X-20). The stanza shows that the Lord is the Atma (Self) of all beings. Does it say, 'the Self of the selves'? If, on the other hand, you merge in the Self there will be no individuality left. You will become the Source itself. In that case what is surrender? Who is to surrender what and to whom? This constitutes devotion, wisdom, and investigation.
Among the Vaishnavites too, Saint Nammalvar says, 'I was in a maze, sticking to 'I' and 'mine'; I wandered without knowing my Self. On realising my Self I understand that I myself am You and that 'mine' (i.e., my possessions) is only You.'
Thus - you see - Devotion is nothing more than knowing oneself. The school of Qualified Monism also admits it. Still, adhering to their traditional doctrine, they persist in affirming that the individuals are part of the Supreme - his limbs as it were. Their traditional doctrine says also that the individual soul should be made pure and then surrendered to the Supreme; then the ego is lost and one goes to the regions of Vishnu after one's death; then finally there is the enjoyment of the Supreme (or the Infinite)!
To say that one is apart from the Primal Source is itself a pretension; to add that one divested of the ego becomes pure and yet retains individuality only to enjoy or serve the Supreme, is a deceitful stratagem. What duplicity is this - first to appropriate what is really His, and then pretend to experience or serve Him! Is not all this already known to Him?

Talks with Sri Ramana maharshi
« Last Edit: May 25, 2014, 07:38:55 PM by Ravi.N »

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #653 on: July 19, 2014, 09:52:02 AM »
D:After leaving this Ashram in October, I was aware of the Presence that prevails in Sri Bhagavan?s presence enfolding me for about ten days. All the time, while busy in my work, there was an undercurrent of that peace in unity; it was almost like the dual consciousness which one experiences while half-asleep in a dull lecture. Then, it faded out entirely, and the old stupidities came in instead. Work leaves no time for separate meditation. Is it enough constantly reminding oneself ?I AM?, while at work?

M: (After a short pause). If you strengthen the mind, that peace will continue for all time. Its duration is proportional to the strength of mind acquired by repeated practice. And such a mind is able to hold on to the current. In that case, engagement or no engagement in work, the current remains unaffected and uninterrupted. It is not the work that hinders but the idea that it is you who are doing it.

D: Is a set meditation necessary for strengthening the mind?

M: Not if you keep the idea always before you that it is not your work. At first, effort is needed to remind yourself of it, but later on it becomes natural and continuous. The work will go on of its own accord, and your peace will remain undisturbed. Meditation is your true nature. You call it meditation now, because there are other thoughts distracting you. When these thoughts are dispelled, you remain alone ? that is, in the state of meditation free from thoughts; and that is your real nature, which you are now trying to gain by keeping away other thoughts. Such keeping away of other thoughts is now called meditation. But when the practice becomes firm, the real nature
shows itself as true meditation.

Excerpt from Maharshi's Gospel

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #654 on: July 20, 2014, 04:07:47 PM »
Sri Bhagavan's advices:


The Ordainer controls the fate of souls in accordance with their past deeds, their prarabdha karma.
Whatever is destined not to happen will not happen, try how hard you may.
Whatever is destined to happen will happen, do what you may to stop it.
This is certain.
The best course, therefore, is for one to be resigned.


Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #655 on: July 26, 2014, 11:00:10 PM »
If the mind clearly knows that being as it really is,
having subsided and become one with Self, alone is
real happiness, and that rising 'I', a separate individual
or ego, is nothing but misery, it will gain the liking to
subside in Self without ever rising again, having
completely destroyed the duality of likes and dislikes.


(Sadhana Saram, Sadhu Om)
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #656 on: July 26, 2014, 11:10:49 PM »


     














Guru's grace works automatically, spontaneously.
The disciple gets precisely the helphe requires.
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #657 on: July 27, 2014, 04:15:31 PM »
He who does not think that he is the doer is superior to the one who thinks that he has given up everything.

Sri Bhagavan from the Diary of Sri Annamalai swami

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #658 on: July 27, 2014, 04:20:10 PM »
He is not a sanyasi (Renunciant) who thinks that he is one. A householder who does not think that he is one, is indeed a Renunciant.

Sri Bhagavan from the Diary of Sri Annamalai swami

Balaji

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #659 on: July 28, 2014, 01:03:50 PM »

Discourse by Swami Sarvalokananda of Ramakrishna Mutt

http://www.sriramanamaharshi.org/resource_centre/audio/mumbai-ramakrishna-matt-swamiji-talks/
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya