Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 197281 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #630 on: January 11, 2014, 10:31:55 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Part III:

Anubhava - Experience

continues.....


Q: 9:  Is it possible to overcome, even while the body exists, the karma (prarabdha) which is said to last till the end of the body?

B:       Yes. If the agent (doer) upon whom the karma depends, namely the ego, which has come into existence between
the body and the Self, merges in its source, and loses its form, will the karma which depends upon it alone survive?  Therefore,
when there is no 'I' there is no karma.

Q: 10:  As the Self is existence and consciousness, what is the reason for describing it as different from the existent and the
non existent, the sentient and the insentient?

B:        Although the Self is real, as it comprises everything, it does not give room for question involving duality about its Reality
or unreality.  Therefore, it is said to be different from the real and the unreal.  Similarly, even though it is consciousness, since
there is nothing for it to know or make itself known to, it is said to be different from the sentient and the insentient.

Chapter III - concluded.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #631 on: January 12, 2014, 12:37:40 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter IV:

Arudha - Attainment:

Q: 1:  What is the state of attainment of Knowledge?

B:       It is a firm and effortless abidance in the Self in which the mind which has become one with the Self does not subsequently
emerge again at any time.  That is, just as everyone usually and naturally has the idea, 'I am not a goat or a cow nor any other
animal but a human', when he thinks of his body, so also when he has the idea 'I am not the principles (tattvas)  beginning with
the body and ending with the sound (nada), but the Self which is existence, consciousness and bliss, the innate self consciousness
(atma prajna)', he is said to have attained firm Knowledge.

Q: 2:  To which of the seven stages of Knowledge (Jnana Bhoomikas) does the sage (Jnani) belong?

B:       He belongs to the fourth stage.

Q: 3:  If that is so why have three more stages superior to it been distinguished?

B:       The marks of the stages four to seven are based upon the experiences of the realized persons (jivanmuktas).  They  are
not states of knowledge and release. So far as knowledge and release are concerned no distinction whatever is made in these
four stages.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #632 on: January 13, 2014, 12:12:31 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter IV:

Arudha - Attainment:

Q: 4:  As the liberation is common to all, why is the Brahmavarishta (literally, the most excellent) alone praised excessively?

B:       So far as the Varishta's common experience of Bliss is concerned he is extolled only because of the special merit
acquired by him in his previous births which is the cause of it.

Q: 5:   As there is no one who does not desire to experience constant bliss what is the reason why all sages (jnanis)
do not attain the state of Varishta?

It is not to be attained by mere desire or effort.  Karma (prarabdha) is its cause.  As the ego dies along with its cause
even the fourth stage (bhoomika), what agent is there beyond that stage to desire anything or to make efforts?  So
long as they make efforts they will not be sages. Do the sacred texts which specially mention the varishta say that the
other three are unenlightened persons?

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #633 on: January 14, 2014, 01:17:25 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter IV:

Arudha - Attainment:

Q: 6:  As some sacred texts say that the supreme state is that in which the sense organs and the mind are completely
destroyed, how can that state be compatible with the experience of the body and the senses?

B: 6:  If that were so, there would not be any difference between that state and the state of deep sleep.  Further, how can
it be said to be the natural state when it exists at one time and not at another?  This happens, as stated before, to some
persons, according to their karma (prarabdha) for some time or till death.  It cannot be properly regarded as the final state.
If it could it would mean that all great souls and the Lord, who were the authors of the Vedantic works (Jnana Granthas) and the
Vedas, were unenlightened persons.  If the supreme state in which neither the senses nor the mind exist and not the state
in which they exist, how can it be the perfect state (Paripuranam)?  As karma alone is responsible for the activity or inactivity
of the Sages, great souls have declared the state or inactivity of the Sages, great souls have declared the state of Sahaja
Nirvikalpa (the natural state of absorption without concepts) alone to be the ultimate state.

Q: 7:  What is the difference between ordinary sleep and waking sleep - jagrat sushupti.?

B:       In ordinary sleep here are not only no thoughts but also no awareness.  In the waking sleep - jagrat sushupti, there
is awareness alone.  That is why it is called awake while sleeping, that is, the sleep in which there is awareness.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #634 on: January 15, 2014, 10:21:35 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter IV:

Arudha - Attainment:

Q: 8: Why is the Self described both as the fourth state (turiya) and beyond the fourth state (turiyatita)?

B:     Turiya means that which is the fourth.  The experiencers (Jiva) of the three states of waking, dreaming and deep sleep,
known as Visva, Taijasa, and Prajna, who wander successively in these three states, are not the Self.  It is with the
object of making this clear, namely that the Self is that which is different from and which is the Witness of these states, that
it is called the fourth, turiya.  When this is known, the three experiencers disappear and the idea that the Self is a Witness,
that it is the fourth also disappears.  That is why the Self is described as beyond the fourth, turiyatita.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #635 on: January 16, 2014, 01:13:06 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter IV:

Arudha - Attainment.

Q: 9:  What is the benefit derived by the sage from the sacred books (srutis)?

B:       The sage who is the embodiment of the truths mentioned in the scriptures has no use for them.

Q: 10: Is there any connection between the attainment of supernatural powers (siddhis) and liberation (mukti)?

B:       Enlightened inquiry alone leads to liberation.  Supernatural powers are all illusory appearances created by the
power of Maya (Mayasakti).  Self Realization which is permanent is the only true accomplishment (siddhi).  Accomplishments
which appear and disappear, being the effect of Maya, cannot be real.  They are accomplished with the object of enjoying
fame, pleasures, etc., They come unsought to some persons through their karma.  Know that union with Brahman is the
real aim of all accomplishments.  This is also called the state of liberation (aikya mukti) known as union (Sayujya).

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #636 on: January 17, 2014, 04:14:41 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter IV:

Anubhava - Attainment

Q: 11:  If this is the nature of liberation why do some scriptures connect it with the body and say that the individual soul
can attain liberation only when it does not leave the body?


B:        It is only if bondage is real that the liberation and the nature of its experiences have to be considered.  So far as
the Self (Purusha) is concerned it has really no bondage in any of the four states.  As bondage is merely a verbal assumption
according to the emphatic proclamation of the Vedanta system, how can the question of liberation, which depends upon the
question of bondage, arise when there is no bondage?  Without knowing this truth, to inquire into the nature of bondage
and liberation, is like inquiring into the non existent height, color etc., of a barren woman's son or the horns of a hare.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #637 on: January 18, 2014, 09:40:27 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Q: 12:  If that is so, do not the description of bondage and release found in the scriptures become irrelevant and untrue?

B:         No. They do not.  On the contrary, the delusion of bondage fabricated by ignorance, from time immemorial can be
remove only by Knowledge, for this purpose the term 'liberation' (mukti) has been usually accepted.  That is all.  The fact
that the characteristics of liberation are described in different ways proves that they are imaginary.

Q:  13.  If that is so, are not all efforts such study (srvanam, hearing) reflection, etc., useless?

B:         No.  They are not.  The firm conviction that there is neither bondage nor liberation is the supreme purpose of all
efforts.  As this purpose of seeing boldly, through direct experience, that bondage and liberation do not exist, cannot be
achieved, except with the aid of the aforesaid practices, these efforts are useful.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #638 on: January 19, 2014, 10:36:12 AM »
Upadesa  Manjari:

Chapter IV:

Arudha - Attainment:

Q: 14:  Is there any authority for saying that there is neither bondage nor liberation?

B:         This is decided on the strength of experience and not merely on the strength of the scriptures.

Q: 15:  If it is experienced, how is it experienced?

B:         'Bondage' and 'liberation' are mere linguistic terms.  They have no reality of their own.  Therefore, they cannot
function on their own accord.  It is necessary to accept the existence of some basic thing of which they are the manifestations.
If one inquires, 'for whom is there bondage and liberation?' it will be seen 'they are for me.'  If one inquires, 'Who am I?'
one will see that there is no such thing as the 'I'.  It will then be clear as an amalaka fruit in one's hand that what remains
is one's real Being.  As this truth will be naturally and clearly experienced by those who leave aside mere verbal discussions
and inquire into themselves inwardly, there is no doubt that all realized persons uniformly see neither bondage nor liberation
so far as the true Self is concerned.

Arunachala Siva.
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #639 on: January 20, 2014, 08:43:38 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter IV

Arudha  - Attainment:

Q: 16:  If truly there is neither bondage nor liberation what is the reason for the actual experience of joys and sorrows?

B:         They appear to be real only when one turns aside from one's real nature.  They do not really exist.

Q: 17:  Is it possible for everyone to know directly without doubt what exactly is one's true nature?

B:         Undoubtedly it is possible.

Q: 18:  How?

B:            It is the experience of everyone that even in  the states of deep sleep, fainting etc., when the entire universe
moving, and stationary, beginning with the earth and ending with the unmanifested (prakriti), disappear, he does not
disappear. Therefore, the state of pure being which is common to all and which is always experienced directly by everybody
is one's true nature.  The conclusion is that all experiences in the enlightened as well ignorant state, which may be described
by newer and newer words are opposed to one's real nature.

Upadesa Manjari - concluded.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #640 on: January 21, 2014, 09:27:46 AM »
Vichara Sangraham:

(Self Inquiry)

Unlike Upadesa Manjari, this is a running essay. 


Chapter I:

Who am I?

Is not the sense of 'I' natural to all beings, expressed in all their feelings as 'I came', 'I went', 'I did' or 'I was'?  On questioning
what this is, we find that the body is identified with 'I' because movements and similar functions pertain to the body. Can
the body then be this 'I-consciousness'?  It was not there before birth, it is composed of the five elements, it is absent in deep
sleep, and it eventually becomes a corpse. No. It cannot be.  This sense of 'I', which arises in the body for the time being, is
otherwise called the ego, ignorance, illusion, impurity, or individual self.  The purpose of all the scriptures is this inquiry into
the Self.  It is declared in them that the annihilation of the ego sense is Liberation.  How then can one remain indifferent to this
teaching? Can this body, which is insentient as a piece of wood, shine and function as 'I'?  No. Therefore, lay aside this insentient
body as through it were truly a corpse. Do not even murmur 'I', but inquire keenly within what is this that shines within the Heart
as 'I'.  Underlying the unceasing flow of varied thoughts, there arises the continuous, unbroken awareness, silent and spontaneous
as 'I-I' in the Heart.  If one catches hold of it in the body, and remains still, it will completely annihilate the sense of 'I' in the body,
and will itself disappear as a fire of burning camphor.  Sages and scriptures proclaim this to be Liberation.

The  veil of ignorance can never completely hide the Self.  How can it?  Even the ignorant do not fail to speak of the 'I'. It only
hides the Reality, 'I am the Self', or 'I am pure Consciousness', and confounds the 'I' with the body.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #641 on: January 22, 2014, 07:47:41 AM »
Vichara Sangrham:

Chapter I - Who am I?

continues...

The Self is self effulgent. One need giver it no mental picture, anyway.  The thought that imagines it is itself is bondage,
because the Self is the Effulgence transcending darkness, and light.  One should not think of it with mind.  Such imagination
will end in bondage, whereas the Self spontaneously shines as the Absolute.  This inquiry into the Self in devotional meditation
evolves into the state of absorption of the mind into the Self and leads to Liberation and unqualified Bliss.  The great Sages
have declared that only by the help of this devotional inquiry into the Self can Liberation be attained.  Because the ego in the
form of 'I'-thought is the root of the tree of illusion, its destruction fells illusion, even as a tree is felled by the cutting of its roots.
This easy method of annihilating the ego is alone worthy to be called bhakti, jnana, yoga or dhyana. 

In the 'I am the body' consciousness, the three bodies (gross, mental, and causal) composed of five sheaths (the gross,. sensory,
mental, intellectual and blissful) are contained.  If that mode of consciousness is removed all else drops off of its own accord;
all other bodies depend on it.  There is no need to eliminate them separately because the scriptures declare that thought alone
is bondage. It is their final injunction that the best method is to surrender. It is their final injunction that the best method is to
surrender the mind in the form of 'I'-thought to Him (the Self) and, keeping quite still, not to forget Him.

Chapter I - concluded.

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #642 on: January 23, 2014, 10:38:35 AM »
Vichara Sanghraham:

Chapter II:

The Mind:

According to the Hindu scriptures, an entity known as the 'mind', is derived from the subtle essence of the food consumed,
which flourishes as love, hatred, anger, lust, and so on;  which is the totality of mentality, intellect, desire and ego; which,
although it has diverse functions, bears the generic name 'mind,'  which is objectified as the insentient objects cognized by us;
which, though itself insentient, appears to be sentient, being associated with Consciousness, just as a piece of red hot iron
appears to be fire; in which the principle of differentiation is inherent; which is transient and is possessed of parts capable of
being molded into any shape like lac, gold or wax; which is the basis of all root principles (tattvas); which is located in the Heart
like sight in the eye and hearing in the ear;  which gives its character to the individual self and which, on thinking of the object
already associated with the consciousness, reflected in the brain, assumes a thought-form; which is in contact with that object
through the five senses operated by the brain, which appropriates such cognizance to itself with the feeling - ' I am
cognizant of  such and such', enjoys the object and is finally satisfied.

To think whether a certain thing may be eaten is a thought form of the mind. 'It is good, It is not good. It can be eaten. It
cannot be eaten.' - discriminating notions like these constitute the discriminative intellect. Because the mind alone constitues
the root principle manifesting as the three entities of ego, God, and world, its absorption and dissolution in the Self is the
final emancipation known as Kaivalya, which is the same as Brahman.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #643 on: January 24, 2014, 12:39:02 PM »
Vichara Sanghraham:

Chapter II - The Mind:

continues....

The senses, being located externally as aids for the cognition of objects, are exterior.  The mind, being internal, is the inner
sense.  'Within and without' are relative to the body.  They have no significance in the Absolute.  For the purpose of showing
the whole objective world to be within, and not without, the scriptures have described the cosmos a being shaped like the
lotus of the Heart.  But that is not other than the Self.  Just as goldsmith's wax ball, although hiding minute specks of gold,
still looks like a simple lump of wax, so too all the individuals merged in dark ignorance (avidya), or the universal veiling (maya),
are only aware of nescience in their sleep.  In deep sleep the physical and subtle bodies, though entering in the dark veiling,
still lie  merged in the Self. From ignorance, sprang the ego --- the subtle body.  The mind must be transformed into the Self.

Mind is, in reality, only consciousness, because it is pure and transparent by nature; in the pure state however, it cannot be
called mind.  The wrong identification of one thing with another is the work of the contaminated mind.  (The mistaken view
that the attributes of the Reality of the Self to the material world as existing by itself independent of the conscious principle.
This is due to the false identification of the Self with the physical body, as a result of which the ignorant person assumes
that what is outside and independent of the physical body is also outside and independent of the conscious principle)
That is to say, the pure, uncontaminated mind, being absolute Consciousness, on becoming oblivious of its primary nature,
is overpowered by the quality of darkness (tamas) and manifests as the physical world.  Similarly, over powered by activity
(rajas), it identifies itself with the body and, appearing in the manifested world, as 'I', mistakes this ego for the reality.  Thus,
swayed by love and hatred, it performs good  and bad actions, and is, as the result, caught up in the cycle of births and deaths.
It is the experience of everyone that in deep sleep and in a faint, he has no awareness of his own Self or of objectivity.  Later
the experience 'I woke up from  sleep', 'I regained consciousness', is the distinctive knowledge born of the natural state. This
distinctive knowledge is called 'vijnana'.  It shines not by itself but by always adhering either to the Self or the non Self. When
it inheres in the Self, it is called true Knowledge; it is awareness of the mental mode in the Self, or the perpetual awareness;
and when this distinctive knowledge combines with the non Self, it is called ignorance

The state in which it inheres in the Self and shines as the Self is termed aham sphurana or the pulsation of the Self. This is
not something apart from the Self; it is a sign of the forthcoming realization of the Self.  However, it is not the state of Primal
Being.  The source in which this pulsation is revealed is called prajnana (Consciousness).  It is this source that Vedanta proclaims
as prajnana gana.  The Vivekachudamani of Sri Sankaracharya describes this Eternal State as follows:  "In the sheath of intelligence
shines eternally  Atman, the self effulgent witness of all.  Making that thy Goal, which is quite different from the unreal, enjoy it
by experience, through unbroken thought-current as thy own Self."

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #644 on: January 25, 2014, 10:47:21 AM »
Vichara Sanghraham:

Chapter II:

Mind:

continues....

The ever luminous Self is One and universal.  Notwithstanding the individual's experience, of the three states, waking,
dream and deep sleep -- the Self remains pure and changeless. It is not limited by the three bodies: physical, mental and causal.
And it transcends the triple relation of seer, sight and seen.  The diagram (see the book) will be helpful in understanding
the changeless state of the Self, transcending the illusory manifestations referred to above.

The individual self resides in the eye during waking state, in the neck (antahkarana) during dream state, and in the Heart
during deep sleep.  But the Heart is the chief among these places, and therefore the individual self never entirely leaves
the Heart.  Although it is specifically said that the neck is the seat of the mind, the brain of the intellect, and the Heart or the
whole body of the ego, still scriptures state conclusively that the Heart is the seat of that totality of the inner senses (antahkarana)
which is called the mind.  The Sages, having investigated all the different versions of the scriptures, briefly stated that the
whole truth that it is the experience of everyone that the Heart, is primarily the seat of the 'I'.

Chapter on Mind - concluded.


Arunachala Siva.