Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 196924 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #615 on: December 27, 2013, 10:58:45 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

Q: 20:  What is the sign of wisdom, Viveka?

B:          Its beauty lies in remaining free from delusion after realizing the Truth once.  There is fear only for one who sees
             at least a slight difference in the Supreme Brahman. So long as there is the idea that the body is the Self one cannot
             be a realizer of Truth whoever he might be.

Q: 21:   If everything happens according to Karma (prarabdha, the result of one's acts in the past) how is one to overcome
             the obstacles to meditation (dhyana)?

B:          Prarabdha concerns only the out turned, not the in turned mind.  One who seeks his real Self will not be afraid of any
             obstacle.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #616 on: December 28, 2013, 10:07:28 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

Q: 22:  Is ascetism (sannyasa) one of the essential requisites for a person to become established in the Self (atma nishta)?

B:        The effort that is made to get rid of attachment to one's body is really towards abiding in the Self.  Maturity of
            thought and inquiry alone removes attachment to the body, not the stations of life (ashramas), such as student
            (brahmachari) etc., For the attachment is in the mind while the stations pertain to the body.  How can bodily stations
            remove the attachment in the mind?  As maturity of thought and inquiry pertain to the mind, these alone can, by inquiry
            on the part of the mind, remove the attachments which have crept into it through thoughtlessness.  But as the discipline
            of ascetism (sannyas ashrama) is the means for attaining dispassion (vairagya), and the dispassion is the means for
            inquiry, joining an order of ascetics may be regarded, in a way, as a means of inquiry through dispassion.  Instead of
           wasting one's life by entering the order of ascetics before one is fit for it, it is better to live a householder's life. In order
           to fix the mind in the Self which is its true nature it is necessary to separate it from the  family of fancies (sankalpas) and
           doubts (vikalpas), that is to renounce the family (samsara) in the mind.  This is real ascetism.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #617 on: December 29, 2013, 09:19:12 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

Q: 23:  It is an established rule that so long as there is the least idea of I am the doer, Self Knowledge cannot be attained.
But is it possible for an aspirant, who is a house holder to discharge his duties properly without this sense?

B:         As there is no rule that action should depend upon a sense of being the doer it is unnecessary to doubt whether
any action will take place without a doer or an act of doing.  Although the officer of a government treasury may appear,
in the eyes of others, to be doing his duty attentively, and responsibly, all day long, he will be discharging his duties without
attachment, thinking, 'I have no real connection with all this money' and without a sense of involvement in his mind.    In the
same manner, a wise householder may also discharge without attachment the various household duties which fall to his lot
according to his past karma, like a tool in the hands of another.  Action and Knowledge are not obstacles to each other.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                   
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #618 on: December 30, 2013, 10:42:05 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

Q: 25:  How can cessation of activity (nirvritti) and peace of mind be attained in the midst of household duties which are of
            the nature of constant activity?

B:         As the activities of the wise man exist only in the eyes of others and not in his own, although he may be accomplishing
            immense tasks, he really does nothing.  Therefore, his activities do not stand in the way of inaction and peace of mind.
            For he knows the truth that all activities take place in his mere presence and that he does nothing. Hence he will remain
            as the silent witness of all the activities taking place.

Q: 26.   Just as the sage's past karma is the cause of his present activities will not the impressions (vasanas) caused by his
             present activity adhere to him in future.

B:          Only one who is free from all the latent tendencies  (vasanas) is a sage.  That being so how can the tendencies of
              karma affect him who is entirely unattached to activity?

Q: 27:   What is the meaning of brahmacharya?

B:           Only inquiry into Brahman should be called brahmacharya.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #619 on: December 31, 2013, 09:53:31 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice.

Q: 28:  Will the practice of brahmachary which is followed in conformity with the four orders of life (ashramas) be a means
of knowledge?

B:  As the various means of knowledge such as control of senses etc., are included in brahmacharya the virtuous practices
duly followed by those belong to the order of student (brahmacharins) are very helpful for their improvement.

Q: 29:  Can one enter the order of ascetics (sannyasa) directly from the order of students (Brahmacharins)?

B:   Those who are competent need not formally enter the orders of brahmacharya etc., in order laid down. One who has
realized the Self does not distinguish between the various orders of life.  Therefore no order of life either helps or hinders
him.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva. 

 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #620 on: January 01, 2014, 01:20:14 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

Q: 30:  Does an aspirant (sadhaka) lose anything by not observing the rules of case and orders of life?

B:         As the attainment (anushtana, practice) of knowledge is the supreme end of all other practices, there is no rule
that one who remains in any one order of life and constantly acquires knowledge is bound to follow the rules laid down
for that order of life.  If he follows the rules of caste and orders of life he does so for the good of the world.  He does not
derive any benefit by observing the rules.  Nor does he lose anything by not observing them.

Chapter II - concluded.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #621 on: January 02, 2014, 05:59:04 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Invocation:

I seek refuge at the sacred feet of the blessed Ramana, who performs the entire work of creation, preservation and destruction,
while remaining wholly unattached, and who makes us aware of what is Real and thus protects us, that I may set down His words
fittingly.

Importance of the Work:

Worshipping with the instruments of thought, word, and body, the sacred lotus feet of Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi,
the very embodiment of the beginning-less infinite Supreme Brahman, the Sat Chit Ananda, I have gathered this bouquet
of the flowers of His instructions (Upadesa Manjari) for the benefit of those who are foremost among the seekers of liberation
and who are adored by learned persons, in order that they might adorn themselves with it and attain salvation.

This book is an epitome of the immortal works of that great soul Sri Ramana Maharshi, whose teachings entirely dispelled the
doubts and wrong notions of this humble person even as the Sun dispels darkness.

The subject of the book is that eternal Brahman which shines as the pinnacle and heart of all Vedas and Agamas.

That incomparable Self Realization (atma siddhi) which is praised by all the Upanishads and which is the supreme goal
to be sought by all noble aspirants (brahma vids) is the theme of this work.

Chapter I:

Upadesa - Instruction:

Q: 1: What are the marks of a real teacher, Sadguru?

B:      Steady abidance in the Self, looking at all with an equal eye, unshakable courage at all times, in all places and circumstances
etc.,

Q: 2:  What are the marks of an earnest disciple?

B:       An intense longing for the removal of sorrow and attainment of joy and an intense aversion for all kinds of mundane
pleasures.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva. 
       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #622 on: January 03, 2014, 08:41:47 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter I:

Upadesa - Instruction:

Q:3:  What are the characteristics of upadesa, instruction?

B:      The word 'upadesa' means 'near the place or seat', upa= near, desa=place or seat. The Guru who is the embodiment
of that which is indicated by the terms Sat, Chit, and Ananda,  prevents the disciple who, on account of his acceptance of the
forms of the objects of the senses, has swerved from his true state and is consequently distressed and buffeted by joys
and sorrows, from continuing so and establishes him in his own real nature without differentiation.

         Upadesa also means showing a distant object quite near.  It is brought home to the disciple that Brahman which he
believes to be distant and different from himself is near and not different from himself.

Q:4:  If it be true that the Guru's is one's own Self (atman), what is the principle underlying the doctrine which says that,
however, learned a disciple may be or whatever occult powers he may possess, he cannot attain 'Self Realization (Atma siddhi)
without the grace of that Guru?

B:     Although in absolute truth the state of the Guru is that of oneself it is very hard for the Self which has become the jiva
through ignorance to realize its true state of nature without the grace of the Guru. 

All mental concepts are controlled by the mere presence of the real Guru.  If he were to say to one who arrogantly claims that
he has seen the farther shore of the ocean of learning or one who claims arrogantly that he can perform deeds which are well-
nigh impossible, 'Yes, you learnt all that is to be learnt, but have you learnt to know yourself?  And you who are capable of
performing deeds which are almost impossible, have you seen yourself?', they will bow their heads in shame and remain silent.
Thus it is evident that only by the grace of the Guru and by no other accomplishment is it possible to know oneself.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #623 on: January 04, 2014, 10:15:22 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter I:

Upadesa - Instruction:

Q: 5: What are the marks of the Guru's Grace?

B:       It is beyond words or thoughts.


Q: 6:  If that is so, how is that it is said that the disciple realizes his true state by the Guru's grace?

B:       It is like the elephant which wakes up on seeing a lion in its dream.  Even as the elephant  wakes at mere sight
of the lion, so too it is certain that the disciple wakes up from the sleep of ignorance into the wakefulness of true knowlledge
through the Guru's benevolent look of Grace.


Q: 7:   What is the significance of saying that the nature of the real Guru is that of the Supreme Lord (Sarvesvara)?

B:        In the case of the individual soul which desires to attain the state of true knowledge or the state of Godhood (Isvara)
and with that object always practice devotion, the Lord who is the witness of that individual soul and identical with it,
comes forth, when the individual's devotion has reached a mature stage, in human form, with the help of Sat Chit Ananda
His three natural features, and form and name which he also graciously assumes, and in the guise of blessing the disciple,
absorb him in Himself.  According to this doctrine, the Guru can truly be called the Lord.

Arunachala Siva.
assumes, and in the guise of blessing the disciple           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #624 on: January 05, 2014, 10:08:57 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter I:

Instruction - Upadesa:

Q: 8:  How then did some great persons attain knowledge without a Guru?

B:      To a few mature persons the Lord shines as the Light of Knowledge and imparts awareness of the Truth.

Q: 9:  What is the end of devotion (bhakti) and the path of Siddhanta (Saiva Siddhanta)?

B:      It is to learn the truth that all one's actions performed with unselfish devotion, with the aid of three purified
         instruments (body, speech, and mind), in  the capacity of the servant of the Lord, become the Lord's actions,
         and to stand forth free from the sense of 'I' and 'mine'.  This is also the truth of what the Saiva Siddhantins
         call Parabhakti (supreme devotion) or living in the service of God (irai-pani-nittral)

Q: 10: What is the end of the path of knowledge (jnana) or Vedanta?

B:       It is to know the truth that the 'I' is not different from the Lord (Isvara) and to be free from the feeling of being
          the doer (kartutva, ahamkara).

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #625 on: January 06, 2014, 08:41:52 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Part I:

Upadesa - Instruction:

Q: 11:  How can it be said that the end of both these paths is the same?

B:         Whatever the means, the destruction of the sense of 'I' and 'mine' is the goal, and as these are interdependent,
the destruction of either of them causes the destruction of the other.  Therefore in order to achieve that state of silence
which is beyond thought and word, either the path of knowledge which removes the sense of 'I' or the path of devotion
which removes the sense of 'mine' will suffice.  So there is no doubt that the end of the paths of devotion and knowledge
is one and the same.

Q: 12.  What is the mark of the ego?

B:  The individual soul of the form of 'I' is the ego.  The Self which is of the nature of intelligence (Chit) has no sense of 'O'.
Nor does the insentient body possesses a sense of 'I'.  The mysterious appearance of a delusive ego between the intelligent
and the insentient being the root cause of all these troubles, upon its destruction by whatever means, that which really exists
will be seen as it is.  This is called liberation (moksha).

Chapter I - concluded.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #626 on: January 07, 2014, 09:43:40 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter III:

Anubhava - Experience:

Q: 1:  What is the light of consciousness?

B:       It is the self luminous existence consciousness which reveals to the seer the world of names of forms both inside and
outside.  The existence of this existence consciousness can be inferred by the objects illuminated by it.  It does not become
the object of consciousness.

Q: 2: What is knowledge (vijanana)?

B:      It is that tranquil state of existence-consciousness which is experienced by the aspirant and which is like the waveless
ocean or the motionless ether.

Q: 3: What is bliss?

B:     It is the experience of joy or peace in the state of vijanana free of all activities and similar to deep sleep. This is also
called the state of kevala nirvikalpa - remaining without concepts.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #627 on: January 08, 2014, 07:50:03 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter III:

Anubhava - Experience.

Q: 4:  What is the state beyond bliss?

B:        It is the state of unceasing peace of mind which is found in the state of absolute quiescence, Jagarat-Sushupti,
(i.e sleep with awareness), which resembles inactive deep sleep.  In this state, in spite of the activity of the body and the
senses, there is no external awareness, like a child immersed in sleep,  ( who is not conscious of the food given to him
by his mother). A Yogi who is in this state is inactive even while engaged in activity.

This is also called Sahaja Nirvikalpa Samadhi (natural absorption in oneself without concepts, even while in embodied state)

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.

   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #628 on: January 09, 2014, 07:38:29 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter III:

Anubhava - Experience:

Q: 5:  What is the authority for saying that the entire moving and unmoving worlds depend on oneself?

B:       The Self means the embodied being.  It is only after the energy, which was latent in the deep sleep, emerges
with the idea of 'I' that all objects are experienced.  The Self is present in all perceptions as the perceiver.  There are
no objects to be seen when the 'I' is absent.  For all these reasons, it is undoubtedly said that everything comes out
of the Self and goes back to the Self.

Q: 6:  Are the bodies and the selves animating them are everywhere actually observed to be innumerable how can it be said
this Self is only one?

B:       If the idea 'I am the body' is accepted, the selves are multiple.  The state in which this idea vanishes is the Self,
since in that state there are no other objects.  It is for this reason that the Self is regarded as one only.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       
 
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #629 on: January 10, 2014, 10:09:53 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter III:

Anubhava - Experience:

Q: 7:  What is the authority for saying that Brahman can be apprehended by the mind and at the same time that it cannot
be apprehended by the mind?

B:       It cannot be apprehended by the impure mind but can be apprehended by the pure mind.

Q: 8:  What is pure mind and what is impure mind?

B:       When the indefinable power of Brahman separates itself  from Brahman and, in union with the reflection of consciousness
(Chidabhasa) assumes various forms, it is called the impure mind. When it becomes free from the reflection of consciousness
(abhasa), through discrimination, it is called the pure mind.  Its state of union with the Brahman is its apprehension of
Brahman.  The energy which is accompanied by the reflection of consciousness is called the impure mind and its state of
separation from Brahman is its non apprehension of Brahman.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.