Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 196388 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #600 on: December 12, 2013, 01:45:00 PM »
Fate and Free Will - Sri Bhagavan's Teachings:  As told to Mother Azhagamma:


The Ordainer controls the fate of souls in accordance with their past deeds, their prarabdha karma.
Whatever is destined not to happen will not happen, try how hard you may.
Whatever is destined to happen will happen, do what you may to stop it. This is certain.
The best course, therefore, is for one to be resigned.’


Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #601 on: December 13, 2013, 10:09:25 AM »
Upadesa Manjari - Part I

Upadesa:

continues.....

Q: 4:  If it be true that the Guru is one's own Self (Atman), what is the principle underlying the doctrine which says that,
however learned ma disciple may be or whatever occult powers he may possess, he cannot attain "Self Realization"
(atma siddhi) without the grace of Guru?

B: Although in absolute truth the state of the Guru is that of oneself, it is very hard for the Self which has become the
individual soul  (jiva) through ignorance to realize its true state or nature without the grace of the Guru.

All mental concepts are controlled by the mere presence of the real Guru.  If he were to say to one who arrogantly claims
that he has he has seen the farther shore of ocean of learning or one who claims arrogantly that he can perform deeds which
are well nigh impossible, 'Yes, you learnt all that is to be learnt, but have you learnt to know yourself?  And you who are
capable of performing deeds which are almost impossible, have you seen yourself?', they will bow their heads in shame,
and remain silent.  Thus it is evident that only by the grace of the Guru and by no other accomplishments is it possible to
know oneself.

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #602 on: December 14, 2013, 12:25:02 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:  Chapter I:

Upadesa:

continues....

Q: 5:  What the marks of the Guru's Grace?

B:       It is beyond words or thoughts.

Q: 6:  If that is so, how is that it is said that the disciple realizes his true state by the Guru's Grace?

B:      It is like the elephant which wakes up on seeing a lion in its dream.  Even as the elephant wakes up at the
          at the mere sight of the lion, so too is it certain that the disciple wakes up from the sleep of ignorance into the
         wakefulness of true knowledge through the Guru's benevolent look of grace.

q: 7: What is the significance of saying that the nature of the real Guru is that of the Supreme Lord (Sarveswara)?

B:      In the case of the individual soul which desires to attain the state of true knowledge or the state of Godhead (Isvara)
         and with that object always practice devotion, the Lord who is the witness of the individual's soul and identical with
         it, comes forth, when the individual's devotion has reached a mature stage, in human form, with the help of Sat Chit
         Ananda.  His three natural features, and form and name which he also graciously assumes, and in the guise of blessing
         the disciple, absorbs him in Himself.  According to this doctrine the Guru can truly be called the Lord.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #603 on: December 15, 2013, 10:07:38 AM »
Upadesa Manjari -

Chapter I.

Upadesa:

continues....

Q: 8:  How then did some great persons attain Knowledge without a Guru?

B:      To a few mature persons, the Lord shines as the Light of Knowledge and imparts awareness of Truth.

Q: 9:  What is the end of devotion (bhakti) and the path of Siddhanta (Saiva Siddhanta)?

B:       It is to learn the truth that all one's actions performed with unselfish devotion, with the aid of the three purified
          instruments (body, speech and mind), in the capacity of the servant of the Lord, become the Lord's actions, and
          to stand forth free from the sense of 'I' and 'mine'.  This is also the truth of what Saiva Siddhantins call Parabhakti
          (supreme devotion) or living in the service of God (iRai paNi niRRal).


contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #604 on: December 16, 2013, 01:29:27 PM »
Upadesa Manjari -

Chapter I:

Upadesa:

Q: 10:  What is the end of the path of Knowledge (Jnana) or Vedanta?

B:         It is to know the truth that the 'I' is not different from the Lord (Isvara) and to be free from the feeling of being
the doer (kartrutva, ahamkara).

Q:11:  How can be said that the end of both these paths is the same?

B:        Whatever means, the destruction of the sense of 'I' and 'mine' is the goal, and as these are interdependent , the
destruction of either of them causes the destruction of the other.  Therefore in order to achieve that state of silence, which
is beyond thought and word, either the path of Knowledge which removes the sense of 'I' or the path of devotion which
removes the sense of 'mine' will suffice. So there is no doubt that at the end of the paths of devotion and knowledge is
one and the same.

Q: 12: What is the mark of the ego?

B:        The individual soul of the form of 'I' is the ego.  The Self which is of the nature of intelligence (chit) has no sense of 'I'.
Nor does the insentient body possess the sense of 'I'.  The mysterious appearance of a delusive ego between the intelligent
and the insentient being the root cause of all these troubles , upon its destruction by whatever means, that which really
exists will be seen as it is.  This is called liberation (Moksha)

Chapter I - concluded.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #605 on: December 17, 2013, 09:54:40 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa (Practice)

Q: 1:  What is the method of practice?

B:       As the Self of a person who tries to attain Self Realization is not different from him, and as there is nothing else
other than or superior to him to be attained by him.  Self Realization being only the realization of one's own nature, the
seeker of the liberation realizes, without doubts and misconceptions, his real nature by distinguishing the eternal from the
transient, and never swerves from his natural state. This is known as the practice of knowledge.  This is the inquiry leading
to the Self realization.

Q: 2:  Can this path of inquiry to be followed by all aspirants?

B:       This is suitable only for ripe souls.  The rest should follow different methods according to the state of their minds.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #606 on: December 18, 2013, 10:26:33 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice.

Q: 3: What are the other  methods?

B:      They are (i) Stuti, (ii) japa (iiii) dhyana (iv) yoga, (v) jnana etc.,

Stuti is singing the praises of the Lord with a great feeling of devotion.

Japa is the uttering the names of the gods or sacred mantras like Om either mentally or verbally.  (While following the methods
of Stuti and Japa, the mind will sometimes be concentrated and sometimes diffused. The vagaries of the mind will not be evident
to those who follow the methods.)

Dhyana denotes the repetitions of the names etc., mentally with feeling of devotion. In this mind, the state of the mind will be
understood easily.  For the mind does not become concentrated and diffused simultaneously.  When one is in dhyana it does
not contact the objects of senses, and when it is in contact with the objects, it is not Dhyana.  Therefore those who are in this state
can observe the vagaries of the mind then and there and by stopping the mind from thinking of other thoughts, fix in dhyana.
Perfection in dhyana is the state of abiding in the Self. tadarkaranilai.

Yoga; The source of the breath is the same as that of the mind; therefore subsidence of either leads effortlessly to that of other.
The practice of stilling the mind through breath control if called Yoga.

Jnana is the annihilation of the mind in which it is made to assume to the form of Self through constant practice of dhyana or
inquiry (vichara).  The extinction of the mind is the state in which there is a cessation of all efforts.  Those who are established in this
state never swerve from their true state.  The terms silence (mauna) and inaction refers to this state alone.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #607 on: December 19, 2013, 01:18:37 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

continues...

Q: 4: Is the state of 'being still' a state involving effort or effortless?

B:     It is not an effortless state of indolence.  All mundane activities which are ordinarily called are effort are performed
with the aid of a portion of the mind with frequent breaks.  But the act of communion with the Self (Atma vyavahara) or
remaining still inwardly is intense activity which is performed with the entire mind and without break.

Maya (delusion or ignorance) which cannot be destroyed by any other act is completely destroyed by this intense activity
which is called Silence (mauna)

Q: 5: What is the nature of Maya?

B:      Maya is that which makes us regard as non existent the Self, the Reality, which is always and everywhere present, all-
pervasive and self luminous, and as existent the individual soul (jiva), the world (jagrat) and god (para) which have been
conclusively proved to be non existent at all times and places.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
 
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #608 on: December 20, 2013, 12:28:02 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Part II:

Abhyasa - Practice.


Q: 6:  As the Self shines fully of its own accord, why is it not generally recognized like the other objects of the world by all persons?

B:      Whenever particular objects are known it is the Self which has known itself in the form of those objects.  For what known
          as Knowledge or Awareness is only the potency of the Self (Atma Sakti).  The Self is the only sentient object.  There is
          nothing apart from the Self. If there are such objects they are all insentient and therefore cannot know either themselves
          or mutually know one another.  It is because the Self does not know its true nature, in the manner, that it seems to be
          immersed and struggling in the ocean of birth (and death) in the form of the individual soul or jiva.

Q: 7: Although the Lord is all pervasive it appears, from passages like 'adorning him through his grace', that He can be known
         only through His Grace.  How then can the individual soul by its own efforts attain Self Realization in the absence of Lord's
         Grace?

B:      As the Lord denotes the Self and as Grace means the Lord's presence or revelation, there is no time when Lord remains
         unknown.  If the light of the Sun is invisible to the owl it is only the fault of the bird and not of the Sun.  Similarly can the
         unawareness by ignorant persons of the Self which is always of the nature of Awareness be other than their own fault?
         How can it be the fault of the Self?  It is because Grace is the very nature of the Lord that He is well known as 'the blessed
         grace.'  Therefore, the Lord, whose nature itself is Grace, does not have to bestow His grace.  Nor is there any particular
          time for bestowing His grace.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #609 on: December 21, 2013, 12:14:48 PM »
Upadesa Manjari -

Chapter Two

Abhyasa - Practice:


Q: 8:  What part of the body is the abode of the Self?

B:       The heart on the right side of the chest is generally indicated.  This is because we usually point to the right side of
the chest when we refer to ourselves.  Some say that the Sahasrara (the thousand petaled lotus) is the abode of the Self.
But if that were true, the head should not fall forward when we go to sleep or faint.

Q: 9:  What is the nature of the heart?

B:       The sacred texts describing it say:

          Between the two breasts, below the chest and above the abdomen, there are six organs of different colors.  (These are
not the same as Chakras).  One of them resembling the bud of a water lily and situated two digits to the right is the heart.
It is inverted and within it is a tiny orifice which is the seat of dense darkness (ignorance) full of desires.  Al the psychic nerves
(nadis) depend upon it.  It is also the abode of the vital forces, the mind and the light of consciousness.

         But, although it is described us, the meaning of the word heart (hridyam) is the Self (Atman)  As it is denoted by the terms
Existence, Consciousness, Bliss, eternal and plenum (Sat, Chit, Anandam, Nityam, Purnam) it has no differences such as exterior
and interior or up and down.  That tranquil state in which all thoughts come to an end is called the state of the Self.  When it is
realized, as it is, there is no scope for discussions about its location inside the body or outside.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.                         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #610 on: December 22, 2013, 12:09:27 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

Q: 10: Why do thoughts of many objects arise in the mind even when there is no contact with external objects?

B:        All such things are due to latent tendencies (purva samskaras).  They appear only to the individual consciousness
(jiva) which has forgotten its real nature and become externalized.  Whenever particular things are perceived, the inquiry
'Who is it that sees them?'  should be made. They will then disappear at once.

Q: 11: Why do the triple factors (i.e. knower, known and knowledge), which are absent in deep sleep, Samadhi etc., manifest
themselves in the Self (in the states of waking and dreaming)?

B:        From the Self there arise in succession:

     (i) Chidabhasa (reflected consciousness) which is a kind of luminosity.

     (ii) Jiva (the individual consciousness) or the seer or the first concept.

     (iii) Phenomena, that is the world.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #611 on: December 23, 2013, 12:38:08 PM »
Upadesa Manjari :

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice.

Q: 12:  Since the Self is free from the notions of knowledge and ignorance how can it be said to pervade the entire body
in the shape of sentience or to impart sentience to the senses?

B:         Wise men say that there is a connection between the source of the various psychic nerves and the Self, that this is
knot (granthi) of the heart, that the connection between the sentient and the insentient will exist until this is cut asunder
with the aid of true knowledge, that just the subtle and invisible force of electricity travels through wires and does many
wonderful things, so the force of the Self also travels through the psychic nerve, and, pervading the entire body, imparts
sentience to the senses, and that if this knot is cut, the Self will remain as it always is, without any attributes.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #612 on: December 24, 2013, 10:25:00 AM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice.

Q:  13:  How can there be a connection between the Self which is Pure Knowledge
and the triple factors which are relative knowledge?

B:         This is, in a way, like the working of a cinema as shown in the next page.
             Just as the pictures appear on the screen as long as the film throws shadows through the lens,
             so the phenomenal world  will continue to appear to the individual  in the waking and dream states,
             as long as there are latent mental impressions. Just as the lens magnifies the tiny specs on the film
             to a huge size and as number of pictures are shown in a second, so the mind enlarges the sprout like
             tendencies into a tree like thoughts and shows in a second innumerable worlds.  Again, just as there is
             only the light of the lamp visible when there is no film, so the Self alone shines without the triple facors
             when the mental concepts in the form of tendencies, are absent in the states of deep sleep, swoon,
             and Samadhi.  Just as the lamp illumines the lens etc., while remaining unaffected, the Self illumines the
             ego (chidabhasa) etc., while remaining unaffected.

            The Picture:

            i. The lamp inside the apparatus                           - i. the Self
            ii. The lens in front of the lamp                              -ii The pure Sattvic mind close to the Self.
           iii. The film which is a long series of
                (separate photos)                                            -iii. The stream of latent tendencies consisting of thoughts.
            iv. The lens, the light passing through it
                 and the lamp, which together form
                 the focused light.                                            -iv.  The mind, the illumination of it and the Self, which together
                                                                                               form the Jiva or seer.
             v. The light passing through the lens
                 and falling on the screen.                               -v.   The light of the Self emerging from the mind through the
                                                                                               senses, and falling on the world.
            vi.  The various  kinds of pictures
                  appearing in the light of the screen,             -vi.   The various forms and names appearing as the objects perceived
                                                                                                in the light of the world.
           vii.  The mechanism which sets the film
                 in motion.                                                      -vii.    The divine law manifesting the latent tendencies of the mind.


Arunachala Siva.                               
                                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #613 on: December 25, 2013, 12:27:29 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa - Practice:

Q: 14:  What is dhyana? (meditation).

B:         It is abiding as one's Self without swerving in any way from one's real nature and without feeling that one is meditating.
As one is not in the least conscious of the different states of waking, dreaming etc., in this condition, the sleep (noticeable) here
is also regarded as dhyana.

Q: 15:  What is the difference between dhyana and samadhi?

B:         Dhyana is achieved through deliberate mental effort; in Samadhi there is no such effort.

Q: 16:  What are the factors to be kept in view in dhyana?

B:         It is important for one who is established in his Self (atma nishta) to see that he does not swerve in the least from
this absorption.  By swerving from his true state, he may see before him bright effulgence etc. or hear unusual sounds or
regard as real the visions of gods appearing within or outside himself.  He should not be deceived by these and forget himself.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #614 on: December 26, 2013, 12:38:25 PM »
Upadesa Manjari:

Chapter II:

Abhyasa  - Practice.

Q: 17:  What are the rules of conduct which an aspirant (sadhaka) should follow?

B:         Moderation in food, moderation in sleep, and moderation in speech.

Q: 18:  How long should one practice?

B:         Until the mind attains effortlessly its natural state of freedom from concepts, that is, till the sense of 'I' and 'mine'
            exists no longer.

Q:  19: What is the meaning of dwelling in solitude (ekanta vasa)?

B:         As the Self is all pervasive it has no particular place for solitude.  The state of being free from mental concepts is called
            'dwelling in solitude'.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.