Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 196884 times)

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #330 on: February 23, 2013, 09:31:18 AM »


When you really feel that equal love for all, when your heart has
so expanded as to embrace the whole of creation, you will
certainly not feel like giving up this or that; you will simply
drop off from secular life as a ripe fruit does from the branch
of a tree. You will feel that the whole world is your home.


(Path of Self Knowledge)

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #331 on: February 23, 2013, 09:49:31 AM »


             

Oh Lord! Hill of my refuge, who curest the ills of
recurrent births, it is for Thee to cure my mother’s fever.

Oh God who slayest death! Reveal Thy feet in the
Heart-Lotus of her who bore me to take refuge at Thy Lotus-
Feet, and shield her from death. What is death if scrutinised?

Arunachala, Thou blazing fire of Knowledge! Enfold
my mother in Thy Light and make her one with Thee.
What need then for cremation?

Arunachala, Dispeller of illusion! Why dost Thou
delay to dispel my mother’s delirium? Is there any but Thee
to watch as a Mother over one who has sought refuge in
Thee and to rescue from the tyranny of karma?


--
« Last Edit: February 23, 2013, 09:51:13 AM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #332 on: February 23, 2013, 10:24:36 AM »
Dear Nagaraj,

This is an interesting poetic request by Sri Bhagavan when His Mother took seriously ill. He prays to Arunachala.
THIS IS THE ONLY OCCASION WHERE SRI BHAGAVAN PRAYS FOR SOMEONE OTHER THAN HIMSELF.

Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #333 on: February 24, 2013, 03:53:40 AM »
Without giving room even to the thought which occurs in the form of doubt, whether it is possible to stay merely as the very Self, whether all the vasanas can be destroyed, one should firmly and unceasingly carry on meditation on the Self.

(Who am I)

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #334 on: February 25, 2013, 01:05:58 PM »
"Pursue the inquiry 'Who am I' relentlessly. Analyse your entire personality. Try to find out where the I-thought begins. Go on with your meditations. Keep turning your attention within. One day the wheel of thought will slow down and an intuition will mysteriously arise. Follow that intuition, let your thinking stop, and it will lead eventually to the goal."

 'In Days of Great Peace' by Mouni Sadhu
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #335 on: February 25, 2013, 01:34:53 PM »
You have to ask yourself the question,Who am I? This investigation will leadin the end to the discovery of somethingwithin you which is behind the mind.Solve that great problem, and you willsolve all other problems thereby. 

A Search in Secret India
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Balaji

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #336 on: March 02, 2013, 01:11:17 PM »
The Siddhas' Lesson
============A STORY

In the Vasishtam it is stated that Rama, after his return from a pilgrimage, found that the whole world was full of misery and that bearing the body was itself a cause of misery.

He, therefore left everything, even things like eating and drinking, and remained motionless. When Viswamitra asked Dasaratha to send Rama to guard his oblations ceremony
(yagna), Dasaratha said that Rama was like a mad man and
described some of the signs of his madness.

On hearing them, Viswamitra said that he was very pleased to hear of those symptoms, that such madness did not come to many people and that he would like to see him and asked for him to be brought.

Rama accordingly came, prostrated before all those present and sat down. Viswamitra saw him and asked him the cause of his
madness, and addressing Vasishta, said, “Please teach Rama
the knowledge of the Self, the knowledge which Brahma taught
you and me.”

Vasishta agreed to do so. While he was teaching, siddhas from all over came to listen to him and they thought to themselves, “Rama has gained so much knowledge at such a young age. How surprising! How great! What is the use of our living so long?”

Sri Ramana Maharshi

from the Ramana Rajyam facebook
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #337 on: March 13, 2013, 06:24:52 PM »
Without  upasana there cannot be attainment for him this is definite.

(Ramana Gita)
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Hari

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #338 on: March 13, 2013, 06:27:17 PM »
Dear Nagaraj, what is Upasana?
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Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #339 on: March 13, 2013, 06:38:46 PM »
Dear Hari,

Upasana is praying or meditating or doing pujas, with form-ful God.  Meditation can also be done with formless God.

Arunachala Siva.     

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #340 on: March 13, 2013, 06:39:06 PM »
Upasana is any kind of recognised regular spiritual practice, that usually involves the discipline of body mind and soul, reconised spiritual practices is an holistic discipline.



Additional stray thoughts -

Usually a sadhaka takes a firm resolve to practice the discipline regularly, without any expectations of fruits of such practice, it results in fine refinement of ones body mind and soul.

Just Jnana will not be enough if body does not co operate or mind does not co operate. We all have enough Jnana and clarity, but what stops from the Atma to shine is just because the body and mind does not co-operate with the soul or Jnana.

It is cultivating of all-round best practices as hailed in all religions, the substratum being absolute purity, cleanliness of body and mind.

A spiritual practice may usually be monotonous mechanical habitual discipline - it is so, so as to discipline the body and mind from seeking varieties and changes and various experiences and simply perform action without absolutely any desire or aspirations for fruits of such spiritual practice, and thereby disciplining the mind and body to implicitly obey to the commands of the discipline which is the Dharma and cease from questioning in the lines of what is the use of these mundane meaningless disciplines, etc...

When this is mastered, the obligatory actions drop off themselves, leaving the perfect nature to prevail, absolute purity prevails, shines.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Hari

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #341 on: March 13, 2013, 06:51:43 PM »
Oh, thank you very much! :)
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Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #342 on: March 21, 2013, 05:43:17 PM »
"My" implies the "I", which owns the senses.  You take your existence for granted, at the same time, ask others to prove it to you.  Similarly you admit the certainty of your senses, which see others, whilst denying all certainty.  You see how you contradict yourself!  The fact is that there are no others.  There is no such a person as "You".  Each man, although addressed as "You", styles himself as "I".  Even the confirmation you demand from others comes only from the "I".  "You" and "they" occur to the "I", without which they are meaningless.

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #343 on: March 21, 2013, 05:59:16 PM »
The ‘I’ casts off the illusion of ‘I’ and yet remains as ‘I’.
Such is the paradox of Self-realization.
The realized do not see any contradiction in it.


(Be as you are)

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Humility - Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #344 on: March 23, 2013, 09:09:25 AM »
Humility

Maharshi prized humility. He himself had a natural, effortless humility, and he frequently stressed that humility was necessary for spiritual development. But how to practice it? This is a big problem because attempting to be humble is just the ego adopting a new behavior pattern. If it's done deliberately, it's not true humility.

     Lakshmana Swamy, a direct disciple of Sri Ramana, also stresses humility, even occasionally saying that humility alone will be enough to attain realization of the Self. However, he defines humility as 'the mind humbling itself before the Self'. This, for me, is the true humility. To whatever extent your mind has surrendered to the Self within, to that extent you are humble. It is nothing to do with how you behave with other people. If the inner humility that comes from an attenuated mind is there, then true humility will manifest in outer behavior. Humility is egolessness, and egolessness is attained by making the mind subside into its source, the Self.

     Let me give you an extract from a book, Sri Ramana Darsanam, that I recently edited. This is Sri Ramana speaking about the necessity of humility:
 
     The power of humility, which bestows immortality, is the foremost among powers that are hard to attain. Since the only benefit of learning and other similar virtues is the attainment of humility, humility alone is the real ornament of the sages. It is the storehouse of all other virtues and is therefore extolled as the wealth of divine grace. Although it is a characteristic befitting wise people in general, it is especially indispensable for sadhus.

     Since attaining greatness is impossible for anyone except by humility, all the disciplines of conduct such as yama and niyama, which are prescribed specifically for aspirants on the spiritual path, have as their aim only the attainment of humility. Humility is indeed the hallmark of the destruction of the ego. Because of this, humility is especially extolled by sadhus themselves as the code of conduct befitting them.

     Moreover, for those who are residing at Arunachala, it is indispensable in every way. Arunachala is the sacred place where even the embodiments of God, Brahma, Vishnu and Sakti, humbly subsided. Since it has the power to humble even those who would not be humbled, those who do not humbly subside at Arunachala will surely not attain that redeeming virtue anywhere else. The Supreme Lord, who is the highest of the high, shines unrivalled and unsurpassed only because he remains the humblest of the humble. When the divine virtue of humility is necessary even for the Supreme Lord, who is totally independent, is it necessary to emphasize that it is absolutely indispensable for sadhus who do not have such independence? Therefore, just as in their inner life, in their outer life also sadhus should possess complete and perfect humility. It is not that humility is necessary only for devotees of the Lord; even for the Lord it is the characteristic virtue.

 
     In the final paragraph of this extract Sri Ramana mentions that God Himself derives His greatness from His humility. This is a point of view I have never found expressed by other teachers. We all imagine God as a being who has infinite power. Sri Ramana is on record as saying, perhaps somewhat whimsically, that God got His job because He was the most humble being in the universe, not because He was the most powerful. Here are two of his statements on this topic:
 
          One's greatness increases to the extent that one becomes humble. The reason why God is supreme to such an extent that the whole universe bows to Him is His sublime state of humility in which the deluded ego never rises unknowingly.

     Is it not on account of His behaving so humbly, as one ever in the service of every creature, that God stands worthy of all the glorious worships ever performed by all the worlds? By seeing Himself in all, by being humble even to devotees who bow to everyone, and by naturally remaining at such a pinnacle of humility that nothing can be humbler than Himself, the state of being supreme has come to the Lord.

 
     All this may sound very eccentric unless one understands that humility equates with egolessness, rather than with a kind of 'nice' or socially acceptable behaviour. God is God because he is utterly egoless, utterly humble, and not because He is omnipotent or omniscient.

(Excerpts from David Godman's Page)

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta