Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 197497 times)

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #315 on: January 06, 2013, 10:29:50 AM »
The wrong “I” is the obstruction. It has to be removed in order that
the true “I” may not be hidden.


(Talks)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #316 on: January 06, 2013, 10:33:24 AM »
You must distinguish between the “I,” pure in itself, and the “I”-thought.

The latter, being merely a thought, sees subject and object, sleeps, wakes up, eats and thinks, dies and is reborn.

But the pure “I” is the pure Being, eternal existence, free from ignorance and thought-illusion.


(Guru Ramana)

The mental states are of two kinds. One is the natural state and the other is the transformation into forms or objects. The first is the truth, and the other is according to the doer (kartrutantra). When the latter perishes,jale kataka renuvat (like the clearing nut paste in water) the former will remain over.

(Talks)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #317 on: January 06, 2013, 10:36:38 AM »
The State of non-emergence of “I” is the state of being THAT. Without questing for that State of the non-emergence of “I” and attaining It, how can one accomplish one's own extinction, from which the “I” does not revive? Without that attainment how is it possible to abide in one's true State, where one is THAT?

(Forty Verses on Reality. Trans. Arthur Osborne)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #318 on: January 09, 2013, 07:04:36 AM »
If you dream and see several men, and then wake up and recall your dream, do you try to ascertain if the persons of your dream
creation are also awake?

Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi

Ravi.N

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #319 on: January 11, 2013, 08:30:12 AM »
11th February, 1936 Talk 158.
Mr. Frydman: Janaka was a Jnani and still he ruled his dominions.
Does not action require activity of the mind? What is the rationale
of the working of a jnani’s mind?
M.: You say, “Janaka was a Jnani and yet active, etc.” Does Janaka ask
the question? The question is in your mind only. The Jnani is not
aware of anything besides the Self. He has no doubts of the kind.
D.: Probably it is like a dream. Just as we speak of our dreams, so
they think of their actions.
M.: Even the dream, etc. is in your mind. This explanation too is in
your mind only
.
D.: Yes. I see. All is Ramana-Maya - made up of the Self.
M.: If so, there will be no duality and no talk.
D.: A man, on realising the Self, can help the world more effectively.
Is it not so?
M.: If the world be apart from the Self.

Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #320 on: January 13, 2013, 07:55:44 AM »
Unless one follows the principle, “That which is essential to be reformed is only my own mind”, one’s mind will become more and more impure by seeing the defects of others.

 (Guru Vachaka Kovai, 788)

 ॐ
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #321 on: February 08, 2013, 04:35:43 PM »
Whatever thoughts arise as obstacles to one's sadhana (spiritual discipline), the mind should not be allowed to go in their direction, but should be made to rest in one's self which is the Atman; one should remain as witness to whatever happens, adopting the attitude “Let whatever strange things happen, happen; let us see!” This should be one's practice. In other words, one should not identify oneself with appearances; one should never relinquish one's self. This is the proper means for destruction of the mind (manonasa) which is of the nature of seeing the body as self, and which is the cause of all the aforesaid obstacles.

(Self Enquiry)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #322 on: February 11, 2013, 09:51:17 AM »
This is suitable only for ripe souls. The rest should follow different methods according to the state of their minds.

(Self Inquiry)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #323 on: February 13, 2013, 08:36:19 AM »
Vaidharbha’s question was: “In practice, the thoughts are found to manifest and subside alternately. Is this jnana?” Sri Bhagavan explained the doubt as follows:

Some people think that there are different stages in jnana. The Self is nitya aparoksha,  i.e., ever-realised, knowingly or unknowingly. Sravana, they argue, should therefore be aparoksha jnana (directly experienced) and not paroksha jnana (indirect knowledge). But jnana should result in duhkha nivriti (loss of misery) whereas sravana alone does not bring it about. Therefore they say, though aparoksha, it is not unshaken; the rising of vasanas is the cause of its being weak (not unchanging); when the vasanas are removed, jnana becomes unshaken and bears fruit.

Others say sravana is only paroksha jnana. By manana (reflection) it becomes aparoksha spasmodically. The obstruction to its continuity is the vasanas: they rise up with reinforced vigour after manana. They must be held in check. Such vigilance consists in remembering = “I am not the body” and adhering to the aparoksha anubhava (direct experience) which has been had in course of manana (reflection). Such practice is called nididhyasana and eradicates the vasanas. Then dawns the sahaja state. That is jnana, sure.

The aparoksha in manana cannot effect dukha nivritti (loss of misery) and cannot amount to moksha, i.e., release from bondage because the vasanas periodically overpower the jnana. Hence it is adridha (weak) and becomes firm after the vasanas have been eradicated by nididhyasana (one-pointedness).


(Talks)

« Last Edit: February 13, 2013, 08:38:10 AM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #324 on: February 13, 2013, 09:14:18 AM »
Is the state of 'being still' a state involving effort or effortless?

It is not an effortless state of indolence. All mundane activities which are
ordinarily called effort are performed with the aid of a portion of the mind and
with frequent breaks.

But the act of communion with the Self (atma vyavahara) or
remaining still inwardly is intense activity which is performed with the entire
mind and without break.


(Spiritual Instructions)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #325 on: February 18, 2013, 03:20:28 PM »
Good and bad are found eventually to be only relative terms.
Self-enquiry is found to be no more than the discarding of Vasanas .
So long as one single Vasana remains, good or bad, so long must we remain unrealized.


(Sadhu Arunachala [A.W. Chadwick], A Sadhu’s Reminiscences of Ramana Maharshi)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #326 on: February 20, 2013, 04:34:40 PM »
Besides that, saying (either), “I do not know myself”, (or), “I have known myself”, is a wide ground for ridicule. Why? To make oneself an  object known, are there two selves (one of which can be known by the other)? Because, being one is the truth of everyone’s experience  (that is, whether they be a Jnani or an ajnani, everyone experiences the truth ‘I am one’).

To say ‘I do not know myself’ or ‘I have known myself’ is cause for laughter. What? Are there two selves, one to be known by the other? There is but One, the Truth of the experience of all.


(Ulladu Naarpadu 33)
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #327 on: February 21, 2013, 03:07:10 PM »
Each seeker after God should be allowed to go his own way, the way for which he alone may be built (meant). It will not do to convert him to another path by violence. The Guru will go with the disciple in his own path and then gradually turn him onto the Supreme path at the ripe moment. Suppose a car is going at top speed. To stop it at once or to turn it at once would be attended with disastrous consequences.

(Gems from Bhagavan)

--
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #328 on: February 22, 2013, 11:22:37 AM »


In samadhi there is only the feeling ‘I AM’ and no
thoughts. The experience ‘I AM’ is being still.


॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #329 on: February 22, 2013, 11:35:41 AM »


what does stillness mean? It means ‘destroy yourself ’; because, every name and form is the cause of trouble. ‘I-I’ is the Self. ‘I am this’ is the ego. When the ‘I’ is kept up as the ‘I’ only, it is the Self. When it flies off at a tangent and says ‘I am this or that, I am such and such’, it is the ego.


॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta