Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 196550 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1455 on: January 29, 2016, 07:12:30 AM »


Tat tvam asi:


However the special aspect of (visesha amsa) of the Self is unknown to us.  That is to say, we are
ignorant of the Self's real nature.  Therefore, the Self is known in a general way.  This is evident
from our day to day statements, such as, "I know myself", "I exist", etc., which we all make at one
time or another. Beyond that, the real nature of the Self as truth, consciousness, and bliss remain
unknown.  At most, some of us may have the intellectual knowledge of the Self from studying the
scriptures or listening to spiritual discourses.

The knowledge of the Self, even at the general level, is unlike the knowledge of an object, for example,
a stone or a chair.  A stone for instance, is always an object because it has to be known.  Being
a material entity, it can never be the knowing object.  As an object, the stone requires a subject
to know it.  The Self, however, is not in such a logical predicament.  The Self is not an object of
knowledge. These objects are known through 'pramanas', such as, perception.
It is however, impossible to prove the existence of the Self by any 'pramana'.

In the case of the Self, there is no need for any proof by any 'pramana'.  In the case of a building,
the existence of the superstructure is sufficient proof for the existence of the foundation underneath. 
The question of proof does not arise at all, because he building cannot exist without the foundation. 
The latter is presupposed by the former.  The same explanation holds good in the case of the Self.
Every case of knowing is made possible by the Self and every time we make any knowledge claim,
we presuppose the existence of the Self. So the Self does not remain unknown. 

An object requires something else to know it.  However, being the ground of all experiences,
there is really nothing apart from from the Self to know it.  " Where there is duality, there one
perceives another, one smells another, one tastes another, one contacts another, one knows
another, but where all this is Atman, who is there to think, smell, touch and know whom?
Who can know him by whom all this is known?....Who can know the Knower?" declares
Brahadaranyaka Upanishad. [4.5.15].

Indeed, the normal mind is an instrument of knowledge for ordinary objects.  Being a finite entity,
the mind can never know the infinite, as the pen will never know or understand the writer who is
using it. More specifically, he Self being Self-luminous,  Svaprakasa, is shining all the time, revealing
its presence.  The term Svaprakasa, conveys the idea that while the Self reveals everything else,
it itself is not revealed by anything.  [Kathopanishad 2.2.15: Br. Up. 4.3.9].


Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1456 on: January 30, 2016, 06:48:52 AM »

The Self is revealing all the time.  At the waking level, at the dream level, and at the deep sleep level.
The Self reveals because that it is its nature.  The Self is eternal light.  It reveals the world, the body,
the senses and the mind.  Even in deep sleep, where the mind, senses, and the body are absent,
the Self is still revealing.  It is like fire, where the burning capacity manifests when something flammable
like a piece of wood, is brought near it.  Fire burns only when something comes into contact with it. 

But unlike fire, the revelation of the Self is always manifest because it reveals not only the presence of
objects, as in the case of waking and dream states, but also the absence of objects, as in the case of
deep sleep.  The power of revelation of the Self is manifest in the presence as well as the absence of
objects. It is the non-relational Self that becomes the Jiva, due to Avidya. The mind-sense-body complex
is a product of Avidya.  What is called the Jiva is the Self in association with or conditioned by the
mind-body complex.  The Jiva is the Self in the body.  Though the Self by its very nature is non-relational,
it becomes relational, as it were, with the mind sense body complex and gets involved in empirical
existence as the knower, agent and enjoyer.  The Self-in-itself, which is not involved in any empirical experience, is called Tuirya, or simply the Fourth.

This is the Self which is called Visva at the waking state, Taijasa at the dream state and Prajna in deep
sleep state.  When all the three states of experiences are transcended, when the Vyavaharika is left
behind, "That Beyond" where only the Self remains is called the Fourth or Turiya.   The Fourth is
beyond the three states of experiences.  There is no cognition, be it external or internal, and all
distinctions of knower, known and knowledge have faded into oblivion.  It is beyond Avidya.  It is,
therefore, said to be trans-empirical and trans-relational.

Arunachala Siva.



Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1457 on: February 01, 2016, 07:07:55 AM »


Running a Veda Patasala is not a social reform.  In fact, He just permitted it and the running expenses
and selection of the teachers were done by Major Chadwick and Chinnaswami.

Bhagavan Ramana has also said that social reforms like Harijan entry into the temples and removal
of caste systems would not bear fruit and if they succeed, the same would not serve the real purpose
but would result in different distinctions within the temples and different classes of societies.

Today in Arunachaleswara Temple, you will see that there are dharma darsanam, free entry, and
darsanam for money, some payment.  Further, with all these, if suddenly one Minister or MLA comes
to the temple, all queues are stopped and even Unnamulai's bathing time is postponed
for a VVIP darsan.  The Tirupati queue business is known to everyone.

Regarding castes, have we really achieved class-less society?  Today, we have got new class distinctions,
an IT worker, who earns in 6 figure salary in India, a bank officer who earns 5 figure salary and a
government school teacher whose salary is not paid for the past six months, because
the govt has no money! 

The President of India has gone on record saying that the prices have gone up, because the purchasing
power of an Indian has gone up?!

Which Indian is this, that he is referring to?  A school teacher, a govt office peon or a traffic policeman? 
think I should read my Milton Friedman once again.

Arunachala Siva.

Sadhak

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1458 on: February 01, 2016, 09:21:01 AM »
Quote
Bhagavan Ramana has also said that social reforms like Harijan entry into the temples and removal
of caste systems would not bear fruit and if they succeed, the same would not serve the real purpose
but would result in different distinctions within the temples and different classes of societies.

The idea of 'equality' is just that. An idea, an illusion. No two people would even agree on the idea of equality and what it really means. They have their own ideas of equality. To some it means equal opportunity, to others it means eating side by side. To the husband it means he will buy the provisions and the wife will do all the cooking. 8) To the wife it means the husband will wash the dishes and help with cleaning the laundry. :P

Though no two persons ever agree on what it means, they all agree on 'bringing about equality'. All the democratic countries in the world have a Constitution that even strives to bring about equality for all their citizens. :o

From the standpoint of jnanis also, again equality cannot happen because there must be two or more different entities to begin with. But there is only one. When there is only oneness, the question of equality does not arise.


Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1459 on: February 03, 2016, 06:37:08 AM »

Chanting God's name repeatedly makes you realize that you have surrendered to God. Only God
is there and not you.  Bhagavan Ramana says that this is the state of Atma Nishtaparan.
Surrender and inquiry are the two sides of the same coin.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1460 on: February 03, 2016, 06:38:41 AM »
Begging for food is an exercise to pull down one's ego.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1461 on: February 03, 2016, 06:41:06 AM »


Some one asked Bhagavan Ramana:  How to remove ajnana - ignorance? 
Bhagavan Ramana said:  Oye, ajnana engu irukku Oye?

Where is Ajnana?  We are all Jnana.  Bhagavan said that there is no Jnanis either, there is only
Jnana.  The ajnana comes because we think we are the thoughts and the world is real.
This is the first fallacy or sin.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1462 on: February 07, 2016, 06:54:14 AM »

A topic on which Bhagavan Ramana's teaching can never be omitted is the state of Sahaja Nishta,
in which according to His devotees, He was permanently established.  Once can easily conceive
of Nirvikalpa Samadhi, where one is absorbed in the Self that all else is non-existent, where one
is awake to the Self and dead to the world, where stands rooted in the Absolute or transcendental
plane alone.  But how can one function both in relative and the absolute plane at the same time? 
How can one, while seeing the Self or Brahman and nothing else, live in the world and function
outwardly as the other men do?  This is something that I at any rate cannot comprehend.  I have asked Bhagavan Ramana about it. He agreed it is really impossible to explain that only a Jnani can
fully understand it.  But by various illustrations, He sought to impress on me how it is possible.
One of these is the cinema.  The child takes the pictures on the screen to be real, while the
adult knows all the time they are only shadows on the screen. The adult need not be blind to the
pictures, but he does not mistake them for reality.  He knows that they are only fleeting appearances
sustained by the substratum of the screen.

Bhagavan has often said that the Jnani sees only the Self and nothing else, in all  that we see. 
This is also what is said in all our books.  There come to my recollection, two instances in
which while not expounding the state of Sahaja Nishta, He spontaneously referred to His personal experiences.  He was telling us of some old devotee of His we arranged a tour for Him to the
several places all over India.  Bhagavan declined to go for various reasons.  When telling us about it,
He remarked:  "What is the use of my going anywhere?  I cannot see anything."  He clearly meant
that wherever He goes and whatever He is shown, He sees only the Self.

On another occasion, when A. Bose's mother prepared various dishes at home, brought them to
the dining hall and served at lunch to Bhagavan and others, He took a little of each and mixed them
all up in one lump, as very often He does and ate them.  He said:
"Let her not make such efforts any more.  What can I eat?  I see only one taste."

(Source:  My Recollections of Sri Bhagavan Ramana, A. Devaraja
Mudaliar.)

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1463 on: February 09, 2016, 04:38:07 PM »

The Ordainer controls the fate of souls in accordance with their past deeds, their prarabdha karma.
Whatever is destined not to happen will not happen, try how hard you may. Whatever is destined
to happen will happen, do what you may to stop it. This is certain. The best course, therefore, is for
one to be resigned.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1464 on: February 09, 2016, 04:40:26 PM »



Unless and until a man embarks upon this quest of the true self doubt and uncertainty will follow
his footsteps throughout life. The greatest kings and statesmen try to rule others, when in their
heart of hearts they know that they cannot rule themselves. Yet the greatest power is at the
command of the man who has penetrated to his inmost depth

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1465 on: February 09, 2016, 04:42:05 PM »



Ye who wish to celebrate the birthday, seek ye first whence was your birth. That indeed is
one?s birthday, on which one is born as the birth-less and deathless Eternal Being.

Aruachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1466 on: February 09, 2016, 05:46:29 PM »


By a steady and continuous investigation? into the nature of the mind, the mind is transformed
into That to which the 'I' refers; and that is in fact the Self.

Arunachala Siva.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2016, 05:48:27 PM by Subramanian.R »

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1467 on: February 10, 2016, 06:45:49 AM »



If one is a realized Jnani, then he has no ego and body and hence the effect of prarabdha
is not felt by him, since he is drowned in the greater experience of bliss of the Self.
Bhagavan Ramana mentioned in Sad Darsanam, the story of three wives becoming widows
simultaneously when the husband dies.  e.g. King Dasaratha.  So all the three karma effects
are burnt lock, stock and barrel for a Brahma Jnani.  As Bhagavan
Ramana said during his cancer years, "only the body is having
pain..."


Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1468 on: February 11, 2016, 06:44:32 AM »



Sri Devi Kaalottaram, Jnanachara Vichara Patalam, rendered in Tamizh verses by Bhagavan Ramana,
in 85 verses from Sanskrit Upa-Agama, (auxiliary scripture), is one of the lesser read or known of
Bhagavan's works, like the Atma Sakshatkara Patalam.


Verse 12:

nivritto vishayajnaanaat nishkala jnaanataparah |
anicchanapi medhavee labhate mokshamakshayam ||

Being rid of the worldly knowledge, the great hero who has
acquired pure wisdom, in which there are no sense objects
and which is all pervading and without any form, will attain
immutable moksha without fail, even though he may have no
desire to attain liberation.

(Source: Tr. Sri Ramanasramam, Tiruvannamalai, 1998)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1469 on: February 11, 2016, 12:31:34 PM »



All scriptures without any exception proclaim that for attaining Salvation,
the mind should be subdued; and once one knows that control of the mind
is their final aim, it is futile to make an interminable study of them.


Arunachala Siva.