Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 196350 times)

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1440 on: January 12, 2016, 07:00:22 AM »

The Self is revealing all the time.  At the waking level, at the dream level, and at the deep sleep level.
The Self reveals because that it is its nature.  The Self is eternal light.  It reveals the world, the body,
the senses and the mind.  Even in deep sleep, where the mind, senses, and the body are absent, the Self is still revealing.  It is like fire, where the burning capacity manifests when something flammable like a piece
of wood, is brought near it.  Fire burns only when something comes into contact with it. 

But unlike fire, the revelation of the Self is always manifest because it reveals not only the presence
of objects, as in the case of waking and dream states, but also the absence of objects, as in the case of
deep sleep.  The power of revelation of the Self is manifest in the presence as well as the absence
of objects.

It is the non-relational Self that becomes the Jiva, due to Avidya. The mind-sense-body complex is a
product of Avidya.  What is called the Jiva is the Self in association with or conditioned by the
mind-body complex.  The Jiva is the Self in the body.  Though the Self by its very nature is non-relational,
it becomes relational, as it were, with the mind sense body complex and gets involved in empirical
existence as the knower, agent and enjoyer.  The Self-in-itself, which is not involved in any empirical experience, is called Tuirya, or simply the Fourth.

This is the Self which is called Visva at the waking state, Taijasa at the dream state and Prajna in
deep sleep state.  When all the three states of experiences are transcended, when the Vyavaharika
is left behind, "That Beyond" where only the Self remains is called the Fourth or Turiya.   The Fourth
is beyond the three states of experiences.  There is no cognition, be it external or internal, and all
distinctions of knower, known and knowledge have faded into oblivion.  It is beyond Avidya.  It is,
therefore, said to be trans-empirical and trans-relational.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1441 on: January 15, 2016, 06:52:29 AM »



Most of us are used to image worship, because it is ingrained in our blood due to the religion
that we adopt.  Bhagavan Ramana never criticized image worship.  He only said that one has
to go past the names and forms.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1442 on: January 17, 2016, 06:18:20 AM »


The problems in reflection (inquiry) are described by Swami Sadasivananda, in his article on Practical Sadhana, vide Mountain Path, Oct-Dec 2008.

Question:  I know Bhagavan Ramana has said:  "The obstacles that hinder realization are habits
of the mind [vasanas], and the aids to realizations are the teachings of the scriptures of the
realized souls.  (Talks No. 13)

What is difficult to grasp, and therefore needs clarification are the methods of carrying out the
teachings, especially, in regard to Bhagavan Ramana's system.

Reflection [inquiry] is said to be one of the most effective and advanced techniques of spiritual
attainment, for it leads to Self-realization.  Reflection in Sanskrit is Vichara, also sometimes called
Manana.  Its foundation is based upon the quality of intellect.

When the intellect is pure and subtle, one begins to reflect upon "Who am I?", what is the nature
of this world, and what is my goal in this life and how am I going to attain it.  These are all the
questions pertaining to an inward movement of the mind.  But when the intellect is externalized,
it becomes tainted through attachment to material things.

This attachment in time, will contaminate the intellect, resulting not in questions vital to man's
inner search, but rather in ones external with acquiring wealth, sensual pleasures, name and
fame, and then equal time is spent warding off troubles that might jeopardize their anger when
the desire is thwarted and from anger proceeds delusion and forgetfulness.

(Source: As indicated above)

Arunachala Siva.


Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1443 on: January 17, 2016, 06:21:26 AM »



Bhagavan say that both the self and the Self are formless.  Because they are not two, they are
only the one without a second.  Names and forms, come about when one takes up a thought and
that is the mischief of ego/mind/intellect.

But one has to know the real nature of the mind, only through the mind!  Bhagavan says,
with the mind that is stone, you polish the Ruby, that is mind.  (Arunachala Ashtakam Verse 5).
He also says when a sugar-doll gets into sweet milky ocean, it dissolves and becomes the milky
ocean.  (ibid. Verse 3).

(I am not able to succeed in Vichara.  As regards surrender, I am yet to achieve the goal.)

Arunachala Siva.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4001
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1444 on: January 17, 2016, 04:46:02 PM »
27th November, 1936 Talk 287.
A Punjabi gentleman, a doctor by profession, came here with his wife to visit Sri Bhagavan. He was in the hall when Sri Bhagavan came in after lunch; then he asked: ?How should I meditate? I do not have peace of mind.?
M.: Peace is our real nature. It need not be attained. Our thoughts must be obliterated.
D.: I have been trying to obliterate them but I am not successful.
M.: The Gita method is the only one for it. Whenever mind strays away bring it back to bear on meditation.
D.: I cannot bring my mind to meditate.
Another devotee: An elephant when free puts its trunk here and there and feels restless. If a length of chain is given to it, the trunk holds it and is no longer restless. Similarly, mind without an aim is restless, with an aim it remains at peace.
D.: No, no, it is all theory. I have read many books. But no use. It is practically impossible to make the mind concentrate.
M.: Concentration is impossible so long as there are predispositions. They obstruct bhakti also.
The interpreter advised the questioner to study Who am I? The doctor was ready with his protestations: ?I have read it also. I cannot still make my mind concentrate.?
M.: By practice and dispassion ? abhyasa vairagyabhyam.
D.: Vairagya is necessary ...
M.: Abhyasa and vairagya are necessary. Vairagya is the absence of diffused thoughts; abhyasa is concentration on one thought only. The one is the positive and the other the negative aspect of meditation.
D.: I am not able to do so by myself. I am in search of a force to help me.
M.: Yes, what is called Grace. Individually we are incapable because the mind is weak. Grace is necessary. Sadhu seva is meant only for it. There is however nothing new to get. Just as a weak man comes under the control of a stronger one, the weak mind of a man comes under control easily in the presence of the strong-minded sadhus.
That which is - is only Grace; there is nothing else.
The questioner said, ?I request your blessings for the good of myself?.
Bhagavan said: ?Yes - yes.?
He left with his wife.


atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2198
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1445 on: January 17, 2016, 08:21:31 PM »
Q: What is the correct waQ: What is the correct way to pursue self-enquiry?

AS: Bhagavan has said: 'When thoughts arise stop them from
developing by enquiring: "To whom is this thought coming?" as soon as soon as the thought appears. What does it matter if many thoughts keep coming up? Enquire into their origin or find out who has the thoughts and sooner or later the flow of thoughts will stop.'
This is how self-enquiry should be practiced.
When Bhagavan spoke like this he sometimes used the analogy of a besieged fort. If one systematically closes off all the entrances to such a fort and then picks off the occupants one by one as they try to come out, sooner or later the fort will be empty. Bhagavan said that we should apply these same tactics to the mind.
How to go about doing this? Seal off the entrances and exits to the mind by not reacting to rising thoughts or sense impressions. Don't let new ideas, judgments, likes, dislikes, etc. enter the mind, and don't let rising thoughts flourish and escape your attention.
When you have sealed off the mind in this way, challenge each emerging thought as it appears by asking, 'Where have you come from?' or 'Who is the person who is having this thought? If you can do this continuously, with full attention, new thoughts will appear momentarily and then disappear. If you can maintain the siege for long enough, a time will come when no more thoughts arise; or if they do, they will only be fleeting, undistracting images on the periphery of consciousness. In that thought-free state you will begin to experience yourself as consciousness, not as mind or body.
However, if you relax your vigilance even for a few seconds and allow new thoughts to escape and develop unchallenged, the siege will be lifted and the mind will regain some or all of it former strength.
Living by the Words of Bhagavan.
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2198
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1446 on: January 17, 2016, 08:36:02 PM »
CONSCIOUS IMMORTALITY
Q: What is the difference between meditation and Self-enquiry?

M: Meditation is possible only if the ego is retained: there is the ego and the object meditated upon. This method is indirect.
However, if we seek the ego-source, the ego disappears and what remains is the Self. This method is the direct one.
- Conscious Immortality p.59
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Sadhak

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1447 on: January 17, 2016, 09:33:21 PM »
"I am not able to succeed in Vichara.  As regards surrender, I am yet to achieve the goal.)".

This applies to just about everyone. Even this state has to be firm, to realize I cannot surrender even after making intense efforts. Only then is there a possibility of the maker of effort to yield completely to the divine will.

atmavichar100

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2198
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1448 on: January 18, 2016, 03:53:05 PM »
CONSCIOUS IMMORTALITY

Q: What is the path?

M: The method can be anything.
From whatever directions the pilgrims gather,
they must enter the kaaba by only one passage.

Q: People speak of different methods. Which method is the easiest?

M: The methods appear easy according to the nature of the individual.
It depends upon what one has practiced before.

Q: What is the jnana path?


M: Yoga is similar because both help to concentrate the mind.
Yoga aims at union of the individual with the Universal Reality.
Yoga is itself an aid to Self-realization, the goal of all.
This Reality cannot be new. It must exist even now.
Therefore jnana tries to find out how separation came about.

p. 59
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Sadhak

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1449 on: January 18, 2016, 10:58:22 PM »
29-10-1945.

"You say that sages have not said anything to contradict each other. Yet, we find one advocating bhakti, another jnana etc leading thus to all sorts of quarrels."

Bhagawan: There is really nothing contradictory in such teachings. When for instance, a follower of bhakti marga declares that bhakti is the best, he really means by the word bhakti what the jnana marga man calls jnana. There is no difference in the state or its description by attributes or transcendence of attributes. Only different thinkers have used different words.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1450 on: January 22, 2016, 06:39:44 AM »



Sivaprakasam Pillai asked Him:  What is the difference between non-attachment and jnana?

Bhagavan replied:  "Non attachment and Jnana are not different. Both
are the same.  Non attachment is where the mind does not go after
any objects/persons.  Jnana is where no object/person appears.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1451 on: January 23, 2016, 07:00:49 AM »




The problems in reflection (inquiry) are described by Swami Sadasivananda, in his article on
Practical Sadhana, vide Mountain Path, Oct-Dec 2008.

Question:  I know Bhagavan Ramana has said:  "The obstacles
that hinder realization are habits of the mind [vasanas], and the
aids to realizations are the teachings of the scriptures of the
realized souls.  (Talks No. 13)

What is difficult to grasp, and therefore needs clarfication are
the methods of carrying out the teachings, especially, in regard
to Bhagavan Ramana's system.

Reflection [inquiry] is said to be one of the most effective and
advanced techniques of spiritual attainment, for it leads to Self-
realization.  Reflection in Sanskrit is Vichara, also sometimes called
Manana.  Its foundation is based upon the quality of intellect.

When the intellect is pure and subtle, one begins to reflect upon
"Who am I?", what is the nature of this world, and what is my goal
in this life and how am I going to attain it.  These are all the questions pertaining to an inward movement of the mind.  But when the intellect is externalized, it becomes tainted through attachment to material
things.

This attachment in time, will contaminate the intellect, resulting not
in questions vital to man's inner search, but rather in ones external
with acquiring wealth, sensual pleasures, name and fame, and then
equal time is spent warding off troubles that might jeopardize their
anger when the desire is thwarted and from anger proceeds delusion
and forgetfulness.

(Source: As indicated above)

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1452 on: January 25, 2016, 06:56:33 AM »




Muruganar says in Sri Guru Ramana Prasadam:

Versse 198:-

My natural duty, as I perceive, is to dwell without thought upon
those feet that abide in Holy Silence, flooding my consciousness
with bliss.  This is the state of liberation, the holy silence in which
the ego that thrives on the mind's confusion is rendered powerless
and disappears completely.

Verse 204:-

He caused a flower of light to unfold in the state of pure consciousness, so that the disastrous error
of a body-mind ego faded.  That radiance grew ever brighter with my love until I realized the flawless knowledge of the Self manifesting as the unbroken awareness I, I, within my heart.

Verse 213:-

Drawn by his magnetic charm I have sought shelter at the lotus feet of Sri Ramana whose teaching
is eternal, so that the murky twilight of the illusory world, created by the trickery of the senses,
has faded in the clear light of dawn like turmeric left out in the sun.*

(*  Turmeric loses its color when exposed to sunlight, and becomes
white.)

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1453 on: January 28, 2016, 06:46:14 AM »


Who am I?

Bhagavan Ramana in Who am I?

Sivaprakasam Pillai asked Him:  What is the difference between non-
attachment and jnana?

Bhagavan replied:  "Non attachment and Jnana are not different. Both
are the same.  Non attachment is where the mind does not go after
any objects/persons.  Jnana is where no object/person appears.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43530
    • View Profile
Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #1454 on: January 28, 2016, 06:48:56 AM »
Faith in Guru's Teachings:

Everyday , whether it is short or long, needs a conviction and steadfast faith in Guru's words.
Many devotees used to ask Bhagavan Ramana whether they could  take up surrender instead
of self inquiry, presuming that the former was easy.  Bhagavan Ramana smiled and told them:
"Do not think surrender is easy,  it is as difficult as self inquiry."  Both the ways need conviction
and faith in Guru's teachings and guidance.

Arunachala Siva.