Author Topic: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough  (Read 981668 times)

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3823
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5595 on: December 13, 2018, 08:54:59 AM »
Bhagwan Sri Ramana Maharshi:
What is called mind (manam) is a wondrous power existing in Self (Atma-swarupam). It projects all thoughts. If we set aside all thoughts and see, there will be no such thing as mind remaining separate; therefore, thought itself is the nature (or form) of the mind. Other than thoughts, there is no such thing as the world. In deep sleep there are no thoughts, (and hence) there is no world; in waking and dream there are thoughts, (and hence) there is the world also, Just as the spider spins out the thread from within itself and again withdraws it into itself, so the mind projects the world from within itself and again absorbs it into itself. When the mind comes out (rises) from Self, the world appears. Therefore, when the world appears, Self will not appear; and when Self appears (shines), the world will not appear, If one goes on scrutinizing the nature of the mind, it will finally be found that 'oneself' alone is (what is now mistaken to be) the mind. What is (here) called oneself (tan) is verily Self (Atma-swarupam). The mind can exist only by always depending upon something gross (that is, only by always identifying a gross name-and-form , a body, as 'I'); by itself it cannot stand. It is the mind alone that is called-the subtle body (sukshma sarira) or soul (jiva).
That which rises in this body as 'I' ('I am this body) is the mind. If one enquires "In which place in the body does the thought 'I' rise first?", it will be known to be in the Heart (Hridayam). That is the source (literally, birth-place) of the mind. Even if one incessantly thinks 'I,I', it will lead to that place (our true state, Self). Of all the thoughts that rise in the mind, the thought 'I' (the feeling 'I am the body') is the first thought, it is only after the rising of this that all other thoughts rise. It is only after the rising of the first person (the subject, 'I', whose form is the feeling 'I am this body' or 'I am so-and-so') that the second and third persons (the objects, 'you', 'he', 'she', 'it', 'this', 'that' and so on) appear; without the first person, the second and third persons will not exist.





Dear devotees, 'that is the Source, birth-place of the mind'. The import of the birth-place is our True State, that is, the Self, rather than any place limited by time and place.  'That place' where even the trace of the 'I'-thought does not exist can only be the Self (Swarupam). Therefore, when Sri Bhagwan says, "If one enquires in which place (idam) in the body the thought 'I' rise first?", what He in fact expects us to do is to enquire 'From what?', in which case the answer will not be a place in the body, but only 'we', the Self, the truly-existing Thing. Hence, as Sri Bhagavan Himself often explained, the true import of the word 'Heart' (Hridayam) is not a limited place in the body, but only the unlimited Self. However, since the mind or ego can rise only by identifying body as 'I', and so long an aspirant identifies with the body, a place for its rising has to be pointed out in the body, 'two digits to the right from the centre of the chest', though, of course, such a place can never be the absolute reality.

Pranam,
 Anil

« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 09:14:18 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3823
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5596 on: Today at 09:25:17 AM »
Bhagwan Sri Ramana Maharshi:

The mind will subside only by means of the enquiry 'Who am I?'. The thought 'Who am I?' (which is but a means for turning our attention Self-wards), destroying all other thoughts, will itself finally be destroyed like the stick used for stirring the funeral pyre. If other thoughts rise (thereby indicating that Self-attention is lost), one should, without attempting to complete them, enquire 'To whom did they rise?'. What does it matter however many thoughts rise? (The means to set aside thought-attention and regain Self-attention is as follows:) At the very moment that each thought rises, if one vigilantly enquires 'To whom did this rise?', it will be known 'To me'. If one then enquires 'Who am I?', the mind (our power of attention) will turn back (from the thought) to its source (Self), (then, since no one is there to attend to it) the thought which had risen will also subside. By repeatedly practising thus, the power of the mind to abide in its source increases. When the mind (the attention), which is subtle, goes out through the brain and sense-organs (which are gross), the names-and-forms (the objects of the world), which are gross, appear; when it abides in the heart (its source, Self), the names-and-forms disappear. Keeping the mind in the heart (through the above-described means of fixing our attention in Self), not allowing it to go out, alone is called 'Self-wardness' (ahamukham) or 'introversion' (antarmukham). Allowing it to go out from the heart alone is called 'extroversion' (bahirmukham). When the mind thus abides in the heart, the 'I' (the thought 'I', the ego), which is the root of all thoughts, having vanished, the ever-existing Self alone will shine. The place (or state) where even the slightest trace of the thought 'I' does not exist, alone is Self (Swarupam). That alone is called 'Silence' (Maunam). To be still (Summa Iruppadu) in this manner alone is called 'seeing through (the Eye of) Knowledge' (Jnana-drishti). To be still is to make the mind subside in Self (through Self-attention). Other than this, knowing the thoughts of others, knowing the three times (past, present and future), knowing events in distant places ? all these can never be Jnana-drishti.

What really exists is Self (Atma-swarupam) alone. The world, soul and God are superimpositions in it like the sliver in the mother-of-pearl; these three appear simultaneously and disappear simultaneously. Self itself is the world: Self itself is 'I' (the Soul); Self itself is God; all is the Supreme Self (Siva-swarupam).





Dear Devotees,

These three words with the note of interrogation (WHO  AM  I ?) are said to be a Fire which burns everything. It burns past, present, and future, as well as the predispositions (Vasanas) and memory. In the the Yoga Vashishta also it has been said that 'Who Am I?' Enquiry is the axe which cuts the ego (I-thought), which is the knot of Consciousness with the Jada or Insentience.  Indeed, asking who am I, keeping attention onto ourselves (Self-attention), and establishing ourselves firmly in the Awareness 'I AM' is the beginning and also the end of all endeavour whatsoever.   


Dear devotees, Sri Bhagwan Ramana has taught that are all really Sat-Chit-Ananda (Existence-Consciousness-Bliss) but falsely we imagine that we are bound by destiny and thus suffers immensely. So, out of great compassion for His devotees, He has taught us  to ask ourselves as to whom this ignorance has come, and if we do that earnestly, with perseverance and love for the Self, we discover soon enough that indeed it (ignorance) never really came to us and that we have always been Sat-Chit-Ananda (Existence-Consciousness-Bliss). Therefore, we must understand that every time we raise to ourselves the question 'Who Am I?', we are moving a step ahead on the path of discovering the Swarupam (Self).     

Anil

« Last Edit: Today at 09:33:09 AM by eranilkumarsinha »

eranilkumarsinha

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3823
    • View Profile
Re: Self-enquiry as taught by Sri Bhagwan is enough
« Reply #5597 on: Today at 02:55:54 PM »
The only burden you've ever had is your mind. There is no other burden. See if you can stop your mind for a few seconds and see how peaceful you are. When there are no thoughts there are no fears, no worries. There are no anxieties, no desires, no wants, no greed, no hurt, no enemies. It is the mind, the thoughts, that cause these things to come to us. We actually create these conditions. We create our own reality.
...
Vichara, Self-inquiry is only to keep your mind from thinking. That's all it is. All the practices of yoga lead to the place where you stop thinking.

Sri Robert Adams