Author Topic: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings  (Read 196519 times)

Nagaraj

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Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« on: October 16, 2012, 10:14:24 PM »
I intend  to open a thread exclusively for the purposes of presenting various quotations, teachings of Sri Bhagavan. Any dicussions, as practice, kindly use the other Discussion thread. Thank you. Everybody is welcome to participate in posting any teachings of Bhagavan that appeals to you, as it is, as published.

« Last Edit: October 16, 2012, 10:25:48 PM by Nagaraj »
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Practice (Abhyasa)
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2012, 10:21:57 PM »
Practice (Abhyasa)

1. What is the method of practice?

As the Self of a person who tries to attain Self-realization is not different from him and as there is nothing other than or superior to him to be attained by him, Self-realization being only the realization of one's own nature, the seeker of Liberation realizes, without doubts or misconceptions, his real nature by distinguishing the eternal from the transient, and never swerves from his natural state. This is known as the practice of knowledge. This is the enquiry leading to Self-realization.

2. Can this path of enquiry be followed by all aspirants?

This is suitable only for the ripe souls. The rest should follow different methods according to the state of their minds.

3. What are the other methods?

They are (i) stuti, (ii) japa, (iii) dhyana, (iv) yoga,(v) jnana, etc.

(i) stuti is singing the praises of the Lord with a great feeling of devotion.

(ii) japa is uttering the names of the gods or sacred mantras like Om either mentally or verbally.(While following the methods of stuti and japa the mind will sometimes be concentrated (lit. closed) and sometimes diffused (lit. open). The vagaries of the mind will not be evident to those who follow these methods).

(iii) dhyana denotes the repetition of the names, etc., mentally (japa) with feelings of devotion. In this method the state of the mind will be understood easily. For the mind does not become concentrated and diffused simultaneously. When one is in dhyana it does not contact the objects of the senses, and when it is in contact with the objects it is not in dhyana. Therefore those who are in this state can observe the vagaries of the mind then and there and by stopping the mind from thinking other thoughts, fix it in dhyana. Perfection in dhyana is the state of abiding in the Self (lit., abiding in the form of 'that' tadakaranilai). As meditation functions in an exceedingly subtle manner at the source of the mind it is not difficult to perceive its rise and subsidence.

(iv) yoga: The source of the breath is the same as that of the mind; therefore the subsidence of either leads effortlessly to that of the other. The practice of stilling the mind through breath control (pranayama) is called yoga. Fixing their minds on psychic centres such as the sahasrara (lit. the thousand-petalled lotus) yogis remain any length of time without awareness of their bodies. As long as this state continues they appear to be immersed in some kind of joy. But when the mind which has become tranquil emerges (becomes active again) it resumes its worldly thoughts. It is therefore necessary to train it with the help of practices like dhyana, whenever it becomes externalised. It will then attain a state in which there is neither subsidence nor emergence.

(v) jnana is the annihilation of the mind in which it is made to assume the form of the Self through the constant practice of dhyana or enquiry (vichara). The extinction of the mind is the state in which there is a cessation of all efforts. Those who are established in this state never swerve from their true state. The terms 'silence' (mouna) and inaction refer to this state alone.

Note: (1) All practices are followed only with the object of concentrating the mind. As all the mental activities like remembering, forgetting, desiring, hating, attracting, discarding, etc., are modifications of the mind, they cannot be one's true state. Simple, changeless being is one's true nature. Therefore to know the truth of one's being and to be it, is known as release from bondage and the destruction of the knot (granthi nasam). Until this state of tranquillity of mind is firmly attained, the practice of unswerving abidance in the Self and keeping the mind unsoiled by various thoughts, is essential for an aspirant.

Note: (2) Although the practices for achieving strength of mind are numerous, all of them achieve the same end. For it can be seen that whoever concentrates his mind on any object, will, on the cessation of all mental concepts, ultimately remain merely as that object. This is called successful meditation (dhyana siddhi). Those who follow the path of enquiry realize that the mind which remains at the end of the enquiry is Brahman. Those who practise meditation realize that the mind which remains at the end of the meditation is the object of their meditation. As the result is the same in either case it is the duty of aspirants to practise continuously either of these methods till the goal is reached.

(Spiritual Instruction of Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Consciousness
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2012, 10:27:47 PM »
Consciousness

Existence or Consciousness is the only reality. Consciousness plus waking we call waking. Consciousness plus sleep we call sleep. Consciousness plus dream, we call dream. Consciousness is the screen on which all the pictures come and go. The screen is real, the pictures are mere shadows on it.

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Difference between the mind and the Self
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2012, 10:49:13 PM »
Difference between the mind and the Self

There is no difference. The mind turned inwards is the Self; turned outwards, it becomes the ego and all the world. Cotton made into various clothes we call by various names. Gold made into various ornaments, we call by various names. But all the clothes are cotton and all the ornaments gold. The one is real, the many aremere names and forms.

But the mind does no exist apart from the Self, that is, it has no independent existence. The Self exists without the mind, never the mind without the Self.

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2012, 10:01:54 AM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Very nice. This is what Sri Bhagavan says in Ashtakam Verse 5.

Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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What is the ego-self?
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012, 12:14:01 PM »
Q: What is the ego-self ? How is it related to the real Self ?
A: The ego-Self appears and disappears and is transitory, whereas the real Self is permanent. Though you are actually the true Self you wrongly identify the real Self with the ego-self.

Q: How does the mistake come about?
A: See if it has come about.

Q: One has to sublimate the ego-self into the true Self.
A: The ego-self does not exist at all.

Q: Why does it give us trouble?
A: To whom is the trouble ? The trouble also is imagined. Trouble and pleasure are only for the ego.

Q: Why is the world so wrapped up in ignorance?
A: Take care of yourself. Let the world take care of itself. See your Self. If you are the body there is the gross world also. If you are spirit all is spirit alone.

(Be as you are)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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Name is superior to form
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2012, 12:17:25 PM »
Krishna Bhikshu: Bhagavan, formerly, whenever I thought of you, your form would appear before my eyes. But now it does not happen. What am I to do?

Bhagavan: You can remember my name and repeat it. Name is superior to form. But in the course of time even the name will disappear. Till then repeat the name.

Advised Bhagavan

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2012, 12:25:42 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Sri Bhagavan says in Talks No. 285:

Ego is I-thought. In its subtle form it remains as a thought. Whereas in its gross aspect, it embraces the mind., the sense and the body.
They disappear in deep slumber along with the ego,  Still Self is there. Similarly it be in death. Ego is not an entity independent of the Self in order that it must be created or destroyed by itself. It functions as an instrument of the Self and periodically ceases to function.

Arunachala Siva. 

Nagaraj

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factors to be kept in view in dhyana
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2012, 01:43:50 PM »
What are the factors to be kept in view in dhyana?

It is important for one who is established in his Self (atma nista) to see that he does not swerve in the least from this absorption. By swerving from his true nature he may see before him bright effulgences, etc., or hear (unusual) sounds or regard as real the visions of gods appearing within or outside himself. He should not be deceived by these and forget himself.

NOTE:
  • If the moments that are wasted in thinking of the objects which are not the Self, are spent on enquiry into the Self, self-realization will be attained in a very short time.

  • Until the mind becomes established in itself some kind of bhavana (contemplation of a personified god or goddess with deep emotion and religious feeling) is essential. Otherwise the mind will be frequently assailed by wayward thoughts or sleep.

  • Without spending all the time in practising bhavanas like 'I am Siva' or 'I am Brahman', which are regarded as nirgunopasana (contemplation of the attributeless Brahman), the method of enquiry into oneself should be practised as soon as the mental strength which is the result of such upasana (contemplation) is attained.

  • The excellence of the practice (sadhana) lies in not giving room for even a single mental concept (vritti)
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2012, 03:20:09 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Yes. Once Sri Bhagavan said: If you don't do Atma vicharam, loka vicharam would enter your mind.

Arunachala Siva.

Nagaraj

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Doing the allotted work
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2012, 05:22:36 PM »
Doing the allotted work in time is itself meditation

Bhagavan used to go into the kitchen by 4 a.m. and start cutting vegetables; one or two of us would also join and help. Sometime the amount of vegetables used to startle us. Bhagavan managed to cut much more and more quickly than the rest of us.

At such times we would look up at the clock in our impatience to finish the job and try to have another nap. Bhagavan would sense our impatience and say, "Why do you look at the clock?" We tried to bluff Bhagavan saying, "If only we could complete the work before 5, we could meditate for an hour." Bhagavan would mildly retort, "The allotted work has to be completed in time. Other thoughts are obstacles, not the amount of work. Doing the allotted work in time is itself meditation. Go ahead and do the job with full attention." Bhagavan thus taught us the important of right, honest work.

(kunju swAmi)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Nagaraj

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guru kRupA
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2012, 04:29:03 PM »
Spiritual significance guru kRupA

The guru is both 'external' and 'internal'. From the exterior He gives a push to the mind to turn inward; from the 'interior' He pulls the mind towards the Self and helps in the quieting of the mind. That is guru kRupA.

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2012, 04:36:31 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Nice. The external guru is in the form of a man or even bird (as in case of Avaduta). They are also the Self. The internal Guru
is the Self. While the external guru pushes your mind inside, the Self within pulls you with It.

The Supreme Lord (Self) Himself appears as Guru in human form to the aspirant, being pleased with his devotion.
(Guru Ramana Vachana Mala)

Arunachala Siva.   

Nagaraj

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Our Natural State
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2012, 04:45:34 PM »
Our Natural State

Pilgrim: You have said here that you know no such period of sAdhanA; you never performed japA or chanted any mantrA; you were in your natural state. I have no done any sAdhanA worth the name. can I say that I am in my natural state? But my natural state is no different from yours. Does that mean that the natural state of ordinary persons and realised persons are different?

Sri Bhagavan: What you think to be your natural state is your unnatural state/ (And this was my second chock that shook me from the slumber of my pet notions). With your intellect and imagination you have constructed the castles of your pet notions and desires. But do you know who has built up these castles, who is the culprit, the real owner? The 'I' who really owns them and the 'I' of your conception are quite different.  Is it necessary that you put forth some effort to come into the 'I' who owns these, the 'I' behind all states?

Would you have to walk any distance to walk into the 'I' that is always you? This is what I mean by saying that no sAdhanA is required for Self-Realisation. All that is required is to refrain from doing anything, by remaining still and being simply what one really is. You have only to dehypnotise yourself of your unnatural state. Then you have asked whether there is any difference between the natural state of ordinary persons and realised persons. What have they realised? They can realise only that is real in them. What is real in them is real in you also. SO where is the difference?

Even then, some may ask, where is the conviction that one's Self is sAkshAt all right, that no sAdhanA is required at all for Self - Realization? Well, do you need anybody to come and convince you that you are seated before me and talking to me? You know for certain that you are seated here and talking to me.

When we read a book, for instance, we read the letters on the page. But can we say that we are reading only the letters? Without the page of the book where are the letters. Again we say that we are seeing the picture projected on a canvas. No doubt we are seeing the picture, but without the canvas where is the picture?

You can doubt and question everything but how can you doubt the 'I' that questions everything. That 'I' is your natural state. Would you have to labour or do sAdhanA to come into this natural state?

(The author of this article is unknown but the incident must have taken place some time after 1946)

(A Pilgrim, ARBOG-VI)

॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: Bhagavan Ramana Teachings
« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2012, 04:51:56 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

Yes. If we genuinely know as to how to remain Still, summa iruthal, no Sadhana is required. We are doing all sadhanas because
we are not capable of remaining Still.

Arunachala Siva.