Author Topic: The third eye and where does this I spring.  (Read 6378 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: The third eye and where does this I spring.
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2012, 04:10:35 PM »
Dear Ravi,

In Self Inquiry, the ego is killed first and then there is realization, vide last verse of Ulladu Narpadu.
In self surrender, one keeps the ego intact till the end and finally submits it to God saying, Nin ishtam, en ishtam.
Both are not the same paths. But both are the two sides of the same coin.

Arunachala Siva.

Ravi.N

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Re: The third eye and where does this I spring.
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2012, 04:19:08 PM »
Subramanian,
In self surrender ,the Sadhana is done by the Divine.One just hands over charge;whether the Ego is there or not there is immaterial.
In self-enquiry,the effort is by the Sadhaka for a greater part and here too the 'Taking over' has to happen.At this point,the enquiry takes on the nature of surrender only.It cannot be willed.
Namaskar.

sanjaya_ganesh

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Re: The third eye and where does this I spring.
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2012, 05:23:20 PM »
Yes - Self Enquiry results in Self Surrender as I understand from both gurus - Ramakrishna and Ramana. Self enquiry is a PATH. Self Surrender is the end.

Sanjay
Salutations to Bhagawan

Subramanian.R

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Re: The third eye and where does this I spring.
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2012, 05:30:21 PM »
Dear Ravi,

I have given what Sri Bhagavan had said. You may have a different definition.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: The third eye and where does this I spring.
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2012, 09:05:07 PM »
Dear Tushnim

The insistence on subjective awareness of 'I' as the only means of reaching the Self colored his attitude towards practices
of devotion and worship which are usually associated with surrender to God. Sri Bhagavan never discouraged His devotees
from following such practices, but He pointed out that any relationship with God (devotee, worshipper, servant etc.,) was an
illusory one since God alone exists. True devotion, He said, is to remain as one really is, in the state of being in which all ideas
about relationships with God ceased to exist.

The second method, of surrendering responsibility for one's life to God is also related to Self Inquiry since it aims to eliminate the I-
thought by separating it from objects and actions that it constantly identifies with. In following this practice there should be a
constant awareness that there is no individual 'I' who acts or desires, that only the Self exists and that there is nothing apart
from the Self that is capable of acting independently of it. When following this practice , whenever one becomes aware that one is
assuming responsibility for thoughts and actions - for example, I am doing this, I want - one should try to withdraw the mind from
its external contacts, and fix it in the Self.       

Sri Ramana Himself admitted that spontaneous and complete surrender of the 'I' by this method was an impossible goal for many
people and so He sometimes advised His followers to undertake preliminary exercises which would cultivate their devotion and control their minds. Most of these practices involved thinking of or meditating on god or guru either by constantly repeating his name or visualizing his form.

Arunachala Siva.