Author Topic: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj  (Read 176845 times)

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #735 on: September 16, 2015, 09:00:37 PM »
Pure Experience is incapable of being pointed at.
Paramatman is devoid of knowingness.

Sri Siddharameshwar Maharaj

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #736 on: September 21, 2015, 09:32:41 PM »
Questioner: What is your state at the present moment?

Maharaj: A state of non-experiencing. In it all experience is included.

Q: Can you enter into the mind and heart of another man and share his experience?

M: No. Such things require special training. I am like a dealer In wheat. I know little about breads
and cakes. Even the taste of a wheat-gruel I may not know. But about the wheat grain I know all
and well. I know the source of all experience. But the innumerable particular forms experience can
take I do not know. Nor do I need to know. From moment to moment, the little I need to know to live
my life, I somehow happen to know.

Q: Your particular existence and my particular existence, do they both exist in the mind of Brahma?

M: The universal is not aware of the particular. The existence as a person is a personal matter. A
person exists in time and space, has name and shape, beginning and end; the universal includes all
persons and the absolute is at the root of and beyond all.

Q: I am not concerned with the totality. My personal consciousness and your personal
consciousness -- what is the link between the two?


M: Between two dreamers what can be the link?

Q: They may dream of each other.

M: That is what people are doing. Everyone imagines 'others' and seeks a link with them. The
seeker is the link, there is none other.

Q: Surely there must be something in common between the many points of consciousness we are.

M: Where are the many points? In your mind. You insist that your world is independent of your
mind. How can it be? Your desire to know other people's minds is due to your not knowing your own
mind. First know your own mind and you will find that the question of other minds does not arise at
all, for there are no other people. You are the common factor, the only link between the minds.
Being is consciousness; 'I am' applies to all.

Q: The Supreme Reality (Parabrahman) may be present in all of us. But of what use is it to us?

M: You are like a man who says: 'I need a place where to keep my things, but of what use is space
to me?' or 'I need milk, tea, coffee or soda, but for water I have no use'. Don't you see that the
Supreme Reality is what makes everything possible? But if you ask of what use is it to you, I must
answer: 'None'. In matters of daily life the knower of the real has no advantage: he may be at a
disadvantage rather: being free from greed and fear, he does not protect himself. The very idea of
profit is foreign to him; he abhors accretions; his life is constant divesting oneself, sharing, giving.

Q: If there is no advantage in gaining the Supreme, then why take the trouble?

M: There is trouble only when you cling to something. When you hold on to nothing, no trouble
arises. The relinquishing of the lesser is the gaining of the greater. Give up all and you gain all.
Then life becomes what it was meant to be: pure radiation from an inexhaustible source. In that light
the world appears dimly like a dream.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #737 on: September 22, 2015, 10:25:29 PM »
Q: Between the body and pure awareness stands the 'inner organ', antahkarana, the 'subtle body',
the 'mental body', whatever the name. Just as a whirling mirror converts sunlight into a manifold
pattern of streaks and colours, so does the subtle body convert the simple light of the shining Self
into a diversified world. Thus I have understood your teaching. What I cannot grasp is how did this
subtle body arise in the first instance?


M: It is created with the emergence of the 'I am' idea. The two are one.

Q: How did the 'I am?appear?

M: In your world everything must have a beginning and an end. If it does not, you call it eternal. In
my view there is no such thing as beginning or end -- these are all related to time. Timeless being is
entirely in the now.

Q: The antahkarana, or the ?subtle body?, is it real or unreal?

M: It is momentary. Real when present, unreal when over.

Q: What kind of reality? Is it momentary?

M: Call it empirical, or actual, or factual. It is the reality of immediate experience, here and now,
which cannot be denied. You can question the description and the meaning, but not the event itself.
Being and non-being alternate and their reality is momentary. The Immutable Reality lies beyond
space and time. Realise the momentariness of being and non-being and be free from both.

Q: Things may be transient, yet they are very much with us, in endless repetition.

M: Desires are strong. It is desire that causes repetition. There is no recurrence where desire is not.

Q: What about fear?

M: Desire is of the past, fear is of the future. The memory of past suffering and the fear of its
recurrence make one anxious about the future.

Q: There is also fear of the unknown.

M: Who has not suffered is not afraid.

Q: We are condemned to fear?

M: Until we can look at fear and accept it as the shadow of personal existence, as persons we are
bound to be afraid. Abandon all personal equations and you shall be free from fear. It is not difficult.
Desirelessness comes on its own when desire is recognised as false. You need not struggle with
desire. Ultimately, it is an urge to happiness, which is natural as long as there is sorrow. Only see
that there is no happiness in what you desire.

Q: We settle for pleasure.

M: Each pleasure is wrapped in pain. You soon discover that you cannot have one without the
other.

Q: There is the experiencer and there is his experience. What created the link between the two?

M: Nothing created it. It is. The two are one.

Q: I feel there is a catch somewhere, but I do not know where.

M: The catch is in your mind, which insists on seeing duality where there is none.

Q: As I listen to you, my mind is all in the now and I am astonished to find myself without questions.

M: You can know reality only when you are astonished.

Q: I can make out that the cause of anxiety and fear is memory. What are the means for putting an
end to memory?


M: Don?t talk of means, there are no means. What you see as false, dissolves. It is the very nature
of illusion to dissolve on investigation. Investigate -- that is all. You cannot destroy the false, for you
are creating it all the time. Withdraw from it, ignore it, go beyond, and it will cease to be.

atmavichar100

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #738 on: October 06, 2015, 10:01:26 AM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #739 on: October 09, 2015, 09:54:28 AM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #740 on: October 20, 2015, 08:41:18 AM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #741 on: October 30, 2015, 09:28:54 AM »
The witness attitude is also faith; it is faith in oneself.
You believe that you are not what you experience, and you look at everything as from a distance.

There is no effort in witnessing. You understand that you are the witness only, and the understanding acts. You need nothing more, just remember that you are the witness only.

If in the state of witnessing you ask yourself 'Who am I?', the answer comes at once, though it is wordless and silent. Cease to be the object and become the subject of all that happens; once having turned within, you will find yourself beyond the subject.

When you have found yourself, you will find that you are also beyond the object, that both the subject and the object exist in you, but you are neither.

Nisargadatta, I AM THAT ch. 64
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

atmavichar100

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #742 on: November 03, 2015, 09:00:46 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #743 on: December 05, 2015, 09:40:50 PM »

If you get yourself involved in the flow,
 then you will come to misery.
You understand what is the flow?
All that maya, the activities.
You try to derive pleasure from the activities:
this is a product of the illness.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #744 on: December 17, 2015, 09:46:21 PM »

Truly all is me and by me. There is nothing else.
The very idea of 'else' is a disaster and a calamity.

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #745 on: February 07, 2016, 06:43:22 PM »
       Q: I came to India in search of a Yoga teacher. I am still in search.

M: What kind of Yoga do you want to practice, the Yoga of getting, or the Yoga of giving up?

Q: Don't  they come to the same in the end?

M: How can they? One enslaves, the other liberates. The motive matters supremely. Freedom comes through renunciation. All possession is bondage.

Q: What I have the strength and the courage to hold on to, why should I give up? And if I have not the strength, how can I give up? I do not understand this need of giving up. When I want something, why should I not pursue it? Renunciation is for the weak.

M: If you do not have the wisdom and the strength to give up, just look at your possessions. Your mere looking will burn them up. If you can stand outside your mind, you will soon find that total renunciation of possessions and desires is the most obviously reasonable thing to do. You create the world and then worry about it. Becoming selfish makes you weak. If you think you have the strength and courage to desire, it is because you are young and inexperienced. Invariably the object of desire destroys the means of acquiring it and then itself withers away. It is all for the best, because it teaches you to shun desire like poison.

Q: How am I to practice desirelessness?

M: No need of practice. No need of any acts of renunciation. Just turn your mind away, that is all. Desire is merely the fixation of the mind on an idea. Get it out of its groove by denying it attention.

Q: That is all?

M: Yes, that is all. Whatever may be the desire or fear, don?t dwell upon it. Try and see for yourself. Here and there you may forget, it does not matter. Go back to your attempts till the brushing away of every desire and fear, of every reaction becomes automatic.

Q: How can one live without emotions?

M: You can have all the emotions you want, but beware of reactions, of induced emotions. Be entirely self-determined and ruled from within, not from without. Merely giving up a thing to secure a better one is not true relinquishment. Give it up because you see its valuelessness. As you keep on giving up, you will find that you grow spontaneously in intelligence and power and inexhaustible love and joy.

Q: Why so much insistence on relinquishing all desires and fears? Are they not natural?

M: They are not. They are entirely mind-made. You have to give up everything to know that you need nothing, not even your body. Your needs are unreal and your efforts are meaningless. You imagine that your possessions protect you. In reality they make you vulnerable. realise yourself as away from all that can be pointed at as 'this' or 'that'. You are unreachable by any sensory experience or verbal construction. Turn away from them. Refuse to impersonate.

Q: After I have heard you, what am I to do?

M: Only hearing will not help you much. You must keep it in mind and ponder over it and try to understand the state of mind which makes me say what I say. I speak from truth; stretch your hand and take it. You are not what you think yourself to be, I assure you. The image you have of yourself is made up from memories and is purely accidental.

Q: What I am is the result of my karma.

M: What you appear to be, you are not. Karma is only a word you have learnt to repeat. You have never been, nor shall ever be a person. Refuse to consider yourself as one. But as long as you do not even doubt yourself to be a Mr. S0-and-so, there is little hope. When you refuse to open your eyes, what can you be shown?

Q: I imagine karma to be a mysterious power that urges me towards perfection.

M: That's what people told you. You are already perfect, here and now. The perfectible is not you. You imagine yourself to be what you are not -stop it. It is the cessation that is important, not what you are going to stop.

Q: Did not karma compel me to become what I am?

M: Nothing compels. You are as you believe yourself to be. Stop believing.

Q: Here you are sitting on your seat and talking to me. What compels you is your karma.

M: Nothing compels me. I do what needs doing. But you do so many unnecessary things. It is your refusal to examine that creates karma. It is the indifference to your own suffering that perpetuates it.

Q: Yes, it is true. What can put an end to this indifference?

M: The urge must come from within as a wave of detachment, or compassion.

Q: Could I meet this urge half way?

M: Of course. See your own condition, see the condition of the world.

Q: We were told about karma and reincarnation, evolution andYoga, masters and disciples. What are we to do with all this knowledge?

M: Leave it all behind you. Forget it. Go forth, unburdened with ideas and beliefs. Abandon all verbal structures, all relative truth, all tangible objectives. The Absolute can be reached by absolute devotion only. Don'tbe half-hearted.

Q: I must begin with some absolute truth. Is there any?

M: Yes, there is, the feeling: 'I am'. Begin with that.

Q: Nothing else is true?

M: All else is neither true nor false. It seems real when it appears, it disappears when it is denied. A transient thing is a mystery.

Q: I thought the real is the mystery.

M: How can it be? The real is simple, open, clear and kind, beautiful and joyous. It is completely free of contradictions. It is ever new, ever fresh, endlessly creative. Being and non-being, life and death, all distinctions merge in it.





 

atmavichar100

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #746 on: March 03, 2016, 01:07:11 PM »
It is the mind that imagines that it does not know and then comes to know. Reality knows nothing of these contortions. Even the idea of God as the Creator is false. Do I owe my being to another being? Because ?I am? all ?is?.

My teacher told me to hold on to the sense ?I am? tenaciously and not to swerve from it even for a moment. I did my best to follow his advice and in a comparatively short time I realized within myself the truth of his teaching. All I did was to remember his teaching, his face, his words constantly. This brought an end to the mind, in the stillness of the mind I saw myself as I am ? unbound.

- I AM THAT
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #747 on: March 05, 2016, 06:23:25 PM »
If you just try to keep quiet, all will come ? the work, the strength for work, the right motive.

Must you know everything beforehand? Don?t be anxious about your future ? be quiet now and all will fall in place. The unexpected is bound to happen, while the anticipated may never come.

Don?t tell me you cannot control your nature. You need not control it. Throw it overboard. Have no nature to fight, or to submit to. No experience will hurt you, provided you don?t make it into a habit.

Of the entire universe you are the subtle cause.
All is because you are.
Grasp this point firmly and deeply
and dwell on it repeatedly.
To realize this as absolutely true,
is liberation.

- I AM THAT, ch 53
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #748 on: March 19, 2016, 01:47:40 AM »
Questioner: Does a jnani die?

Maharaj: He is beyond life and death. What we take to be inevitable -- to be born and to die -- appears to him but a way of expressing movement in the Immovable, change in the changeless, end in the endless. To the jnani it is obvious that nothing is born and nothing dies, nothing lasts and nothing changes, all is as it is -- timelessly.

Q:   You say the jnani is beyond. Beyond what? Beyond knowledge?

M:  Knowledge has its rising and setting. Consciousness comes into being and goes out of being. It is a matter of daily occurrence and observation. We all know that sometimes we are conscious and sometimes not. When we are not conscious, it appears to us as a darkness or a blank. But a jnani is aware of himself as neither conscious nor unconscious, but purely aware, a witness to the three states of the mind and their contents.

Q:   When does this witnessing begin?

M:  To a jnani nothing has beginning or ending. As salt dissolves in water, so does everything dissolve into pure being. Wisdom is eternally negating the unreal. To see the unreal is wisdom. Beyond this lies the inexpressible.

Q:   There is in me the conviction: 'I am the body' Granted, I am talking from unwisdom. But the state of feeling oneself the body, the body-mind, the mind-body, or even pure mind -- when did it begin?

M:  You cannot speak of a beginning of consciousness. The very ideas of beginning and time are within consciousness. To talk meaningfully of the beginning of anything, you must step out of it. And the moment you step out, you realise that there is no such thing and never was. There is only reality, in which no ?thing' has any being on its own. Like waves are inseparable from the ocean, so is all existence rooted in being.

Q:   The fact is that here and now I am asking you: when did the feeling 'I am the body' arise? At my birth? or this morning?

M:  Now.

Q:   But I remember having it yesterday too!

M:  The memory of yesterday is now only.

Q:   But surely I exist in time. I have a past and a future.

M:  That is how you imagine -- now.

Q:   There must have been a beginning.

M:  Now.

Q:   And what about ending?

M:  What has no beginning cannot end.

Q:   But I am conscious of my question.

M:  A false question cannot be answered. It can only be seen as false.

Q:   To me it is real.

M:  When did it appear real to you? Now.

Q:   Yes, it is quite real to me -- now.

M:  What is real about your question? It is a state of mind. No state of mind can be more real than the mind itself. Is the mind real? It is but a collection of states, each of them transitory. How can a succession of transitory states be considered real?

Q:   Like beads on a string, events follow events -- for ever.

M:  They are all strung on the basic idea: 'I am the body'. But even this is a mental state and does not last. It comes and goes like all other states. The illusion of being the body-mind is there, only because it is not investigated. Non-investigation is the thread on which all the states of mind are strung. It is like darkness in a closed room. It is there -- apparently. But when the room is opened, where does it go? It goes nowhere, because it was not there. All states of mind, all names and forms of existence are rooted in non-enquiry, non-investigation, in imagination and credulity. It is right to say 'I am', but to say 'I am this', 'I am that' is a sign of not enquiring, not examining, of mental weakness or lethargy.

Q:   If all is light, how did darkness arise? How can there be darkness in the midst of light?

M:  There is no darkness in the midst of light. Self-forgetfulness is the darkness. When we are absorbed in other things, in the not-self, we forget the self. There is nothing unnatural about it. But, why forget the self through excess of attachment? Wisdom lies in never forgetting the self as the ever-present source of both the experiencer and his experience.

Q:   In my present state the 'I am the body' idea comes spontaneously, while the 'I am pure being' idea must be imposed on the mind as something true but not experienced.

M:  Yes, sadhana (practice) consists in reminding oneself forcibly of one's pure 'being-ness', of not being anything in particular, nor a sum of particulars, not even the totality of all particulars, which make up a universe. All exists in the mind, even the body is an integration in the mind of a vast number of sensory perceptions, each perception also a mental state. If you say: 'I am the body', show it.

Q:   Here it is.

M:  Only when you think of it. Both mind and body are intermittent states. The sum total of these flashes creates the illusion of existence. Enquire what is permanent in the transient, real in the unreal. This is sadhana.

Q:   The fact is that I am thinking of myself as the body.

M:  Think of yourself by all means. Only don't bring the idea of a body into the picture. There is only a stream of sensations, perceptions, memories and ideations. The body is an abstraction, created by our tendency to seek unity in diversity -- which again is not wrong.

Q:   I am being told that to think 'I am the body' is a blemish in the mind.

M:  Why talk like this? Such expressions create problems. The self is the source of all, and of all -- the final destination. Nothing is external.

Q:   When the body idea becomes obsessive, is it not altogether wrong?

M:  There is nothing wrong in the idea of a body, nor even in the idea 'I am the body'. But limiting oneself to one body only is a mistake. In reality all existence, every form, is my own, within my consciousness. I cannot tell what I am because words can describe only what I am not. I am, and because I am, all is. But I am beyond consciousness and, therefore, in consciousness I cannot say what I am. Yet, I am. The question 'Who am I' has no answer. No experience can answer it, for the self is beyond experience.

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #749 on: May 25, 2016, 11:05:02 PM »
However many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them? - Buddha