Author Topic: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj  (Read 177559 times)

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #720 on: March 01, 2015, 05:41:46 PM »

       Even in the sublime state
the mind refuses to believe it is a non-entity.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #721 on: March 02, 2015, 09:31:54 PM »

     To be selfish means to covet, acquire,
accumulate on behalf of the part against the whole.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #722 on: August 09, 2015, 09:27:26 PM »
M: All right, you got all the knowledge you wanted. But in what way are you benefited by it?

Q: It gave me peace of mind.

M: Did it? Is your mind at peace? Is your search over?

Q: No, not yet.

M: Naturally. There will be no end to it, because there is no such thing as peace of mind. Mind
means disturbance; restlessness itself is mind. Yoga is not an attribute of the mind, nor is it a state
of mind.

Q: Some measure of peace I did derive from Yoga.

M: Examine closely and you will see that the mind is seething with thoughts. It may go blank
occasionally, but it does it for a time and reverts to its usual restlessness. A becalmed mind is not a
peaceful mind. You say you want to pacify your mind. Is he, who wants to pacify the mind, himself
peaceful?

Q: No. I am not at peace, I take the help of Yoga.

M: Don't you see the contradiction? For many years you sought your peace of mind. You could not
find it, for a thing essentially restless cannot be at peace.

Q: There is some improvement.

M: The peace you claim to have found is very brittle any little thing can crack it. What you call
peace is only absence of disturbance. It is hardly worth the name. The real peace cannot be
disturbed. Can you claim a peace of mind that is unassailable?

Q: l am striving.

M: Striving too is a form of restlessness.

Q: So what remains?

M: The self does not need to be put to rest. It is peace itself, not at peace. Only the mind is
restless. All it knows is restlessness, with its many modes and grades. The pleasant are considered
superior and the painful are discounted. What we call progress is merely a change over from the
unpleasant to the pleasant. But changes by themselves cannot bring us to the changeless, for
whatever has a beginning must have an end. The real does not begin; it only reveals itself as
beginningless and endless, all-pervading, all-powerful, immovable prime mover, timelessly
changeless.

Q: So what has one to do?

M: Through Yoga you have accumulated knowledge and experience. This cannot be denied. But of
what use is it all to you? Yoga means union, joining. What have you re-united, re-joined?

Q: I am trying to rejoin the personality back to the real self.

M: The personality (vyakti) is but a product of imagination. The self (vyakta) is the victim of this
imagination. It is the taking yourself to be what you are not that binds you. The person cannot be
said to exist on its own rights; it is the self that believes there is a person and is conscious of being
it. Beyond the self (vyakta) lies the unmanifested (avyakta), the causeless cause of everything.
Even to talk of re-uniting the person with the self is not right, because there is no person, only a
mental picture given a false reality by conviction. Nothing was divided and there is nothing to unite.

Q: Yoga helps in the search for and the finding of the self.

M: You can find what you have lost. But you cannot find what you have not lost.

Q: Had I never lost anything, I would have been enlightened. But I am not. I am searching. Is not
my very search a proof of my having lost something?


M: It only shows that you believe you have lost. But who believes it? And what is believed to be
lost? Have you lost a person like yourself? What is the self you are in search of? What exactly do
you expect to find?

Q: The true knowledge of the self.

M: The true knowledge of the self is not a knowledge. It is not something that you find by
searching, by looking everywhere. It is not to be found in space or time. Knowledge is but a
memory, a pattern of thought, a mental habit. All these are motivated by pleasure and pain. It is
because you are goaded by pleasure and pain that you are in search of knowledge. Being oneself
is completely beyond all motivation. You cannot be yourself for some reason. You are yourself, and
no reason is needed.

Q: By doing Yoga I shall find peace.

M: Can there be peace apart from yourself? Are you talking from your own experience or from
books only? Your book knowledge is useful to begin with, but soon it must be given up for direct
experience, which by its very nature is inexpressible. Words can be used for destruction also; of
words images are built, by words they are destroyed. You got yourself into your present state
through verbal thinking; you must get out of it the same way.

Q: I did attain a degree of inner peace. Am I to destroy it?

M: What has been attained may be lost again. Only when you realise the true peace, the peace
you have never lost, that peace will remain with you, for it was never away. Instead of searching for
what you do not have, find out what is it that you have never lost? That which is there before the
beginning and after the ending of everything; that to which there is no birth, nor death. That
immovable state, which is not affected by the birth and death of a body or a mind, that state you
must perceive.

Q: What are the means to such perception?

M: In life nothing can be had without overcoming obstacles. The obstacles to the clear perception
of one's true being are desire for pleasure and fear of pain. It is the pleasure-pain motivation that
stands in the way. The very freedom from all motivation, the state in which no desire arises is the
natural state.

Q: Such giving up of desires, does it need time?

M: If you leave it to time, millions of years will be needed. Giving up desire after desire is a lengthy
process with the end never in sight. Leave alone your desires and fears, give your entire attention to
the subject, to him who is behind the experience of desire and fear. Ask: 'who desires?' Let each
desire bring you back to yourself.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2015, 02:08:23 AM by Jewell »

James

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #723 on: August 10, 2015, 06:59:16 AM »
M:.....the state in which no desire arises is the natural state.
.....Leave alone your desires and fears, give your entire attention to the subject,
to him who is behind the experience of desire and fear.
Ask: 'who desires?'  Let each desire bring you back to yourself.

 :)

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #724 on: August 11, 2015, 02:23:04 AM »

When effort is needed, effort will appear.
 When effortlessness becomes essential, it will assert itself.
You need not push life about.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #725 on: August 11, 2015, 02:26:27 AM »

You want to keep your individuality at the body-mind level
as well as experience
and be in both the beingness and 'non-beingness' states,
 which is impossible.

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #726 on: August 12, 2015, 10:35:43 PM »
Q: Can I change facts by changing attitude?

M: The attitude is the fact. Take anger. I may be furious, pacing the room up and down; at the
same time I know what I am, a centre of wisdom and love, an atom of pure existence. All subsides
and the mind merges into silence.

Q: Still, you are angry sometimes.

M: With whom am l to be angry and for what? Anger came and dissolved on my remembering
myself. It is all a play of gunas (qualities of cosmic matter). When I identify myself with them, I am
their slave. When I stand apart, I am their master.

Q: Can you influence the world by your attitude? By separating yourself from the world you lose all
hope of helping it.


M: How can it be? All is myself -- can't I help myself? I do not identify myself with anybody in
particular, for I am all -- both the particular and the universal.

Q: Can you then help me, the particular person?

M: But I do help you always -- from within. My self and your self are one. I know it, but you don't.
That is all the difference -- and it cannot last.

Q: And how do you help the entire world?

M: Gandhi is dead, yet his mind pervades the earth. The thought of a jnani pervades humanity and
works ceaselessly for good. Being anonymous, coming from within, it is the more powerful and
compelling. That is how the world improves -- the inner aiding and blessing the outer. When a jnani
dies, he is no more, in the same sense in which a river is no more when it merges in the sea, the
name, the shape, are no more, but the water remains and becomes one with the ocean. When a
jnani joins the universal mind, all his goodness and wisdom become the heritage of humanity and
uplift every human being.

Q: We are attached to our personality. Our individuality, our being unlike others, we value very
much. You seem to denounce both as useless. Your unmanifested, of what use is it to us?


M: Unmanifested, manifested, individuality, personality (nirguna, saguna, vyakta, vyakti); all these
are mere words, points of view, mental attitudes. There is no reality in them. The real is experienced
in silence. You cling to personality -- but you are conscious of being a person only when you are in
trouble -- when you are not in trouble you do not think of yourself.

Q: You did not tell me the uses of the Unmanifested.

M: Surely, you must sleep in order to wake up. You must die in order to live, you must melt down to
shape anew. You must destroy to build, annihilate before creation. The Supreme is the universal
solvent, it corrodes every container, it burns through every obstacle. Without the absolute denial of
everything the tyranny of things would be absolute. The Supreme is the great harmoniser, the
guarantee of the ultimate and perfect balance -- of life in freedom. It dissolves you and thus reasserts
your true being.

Q: It is all well on its own level. But how does it work in daily life?

M: The daily life is a life of action. Whether you like it or not, you must function. Whatever you do
for your own sake accumulates and becomes explosive; one day it goes off and plays havoc with
you and your world. When you deceive yourself that you work for the good of all, it makes matters
worse, for you should not be guided by your own ideas of what is good for others. A man who
claims to know what is good for others, is dangerous.

Q: How is one to work then?

M: Neither for yourself nor for others, but for the work's own sake. A thing worth doing is its own
purpose and meaning, Make nothing a means to something else. Bind not. God does not create
one thing to serve another. Each is made for its own sake. Because it is made for itself, it does not
interfere. You are using things and people for purposes alien to them and you play havoc with the
world and yourself.

Q: Our real being is all the time with us, you say. How is it that we do not notice it?

M: Yes, you are always the Supreme. But your attention is fixed on things, physical or mental.
When your attention is off a thing and not yet fixed on another, in the interval you are pure being.
When through the practice of discrimination and detachment (viveka-vairagya), you lose sight of
sensory and mental states, pure being emerges as the natural state.

Q: How does one bring to an end this sense of separateness?

M: By focussing the mind on 'I am', on the sense of being, 'I am so-and-so' dissolves; "I am a
witness only" remains and that too submerges in 'I am all'. Then the all becomes the One and the
One -- yourself, not to be separate from me. Abandon the idea of a separate 'I' and the question of
'whose experience?' will not arise.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #727 on: August 14, 2015, 09:55:33 PM »

If you want to make real progress,
you must give up all idea of personal attainment.
The ambitions of the so-called Yogis are preposterous.
A man's desire for a woman is innocence itself
compared to the lusting after an everlasting personal bliss.
The mind is a cheat.
 The more pious it seems, the worse the betrayal.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #728 on: August 16, 2015, 10:26:02 PM »
Q: A friend of mine used to have horrible dreams night after night. Going to sleep would terrorise
him. Nothing could help him.


M: Company of the truly good and noble (satsang) would help him.

Q: Life itself is a nightmare.

M: Association with the wise (satsang) is the supreme remedy for all ills, physical and mental.

Q: Generally one cannot find such friendship.

M: Seek within. Your own self is your best friend.

Q: Why is life so full of contradictions?

M: It serves to break down mental pride. We must realise how poor and powerless we are. As long
as we delude ourselves by what we imagine ourselves to be, to know, to have, to do, we are in a
sad plight indeed. Only in complete self-negation there is a chance to discover our real being.

Q: Why so much stress on self-negation?

M: As much as on self-realisation. The false self must be abandoned before the real self can be
found.
Q: The self you choose to call false is to me most distressingly real. It is the only self I know. What
you call the real self is a mere concept, a way of speaking, a creature of the mind, an attractive
ghost. My daily self is not a beauty, I admit, but it is my own and only self. You say I am, or have,
another self. Do you see it -- is it a reality to you, or do you want me to believe what you yourself
don't see?


M: Don't jump to conclusions rashly. The concrete need not be the real, the conceived need not be
false. Perceptions based on sensations and shaped by memory imply a perceiver, whose nature
you never cared to examine. Give it your full attention, examine it with loving care and you will
discover heights and depths of being which you did not dream of, engrossed as you are in your
puny image of yourself.

Q: I must be in the right mood to examine myself fruitfully.

M: You must be serious, intent, truly interested. You must be full of goodwill for yourself.

Q: I am selfish all right.

M. You are not. You are all the time destroying yourself, and your own, by serving strange gods,
inimical and false. By all means be selfish -- the right way. Wish yourself well, labour at what is
good for you. Destroy all that stands between you and happiness. Be all -- love all -- be happy --
make happy. No happiness is greater.

Q: Why is there so much suffering in love?

M: All suffering is born of desire. True love is never frustrated. How can the sense of unity be
frustrated? What can be frustrated is the desire for expression. Such desire is of the mind. As with
all things mental, frustration is inevitable.

Q: What is the place of sex in love?

M: Love is a state of being. Sex is energy. Love is wise, sex is blind. Once the true nature of love
and sex is understood there will be no conflict or confusion.
Q: There is so much sex without love.

M: Without love all is evil. Life itself without love is evil.

Q: What can make me love?

M: You are love itself -- when you are not afraid.

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #729 on: August 26, 2015, 02:10:29 AM »
M: The auto-suggestion is in full swing now, when you think yourself to be a person, caught between good and evil.
What I am asking you to do is to put an end to it, to wake up and see things as they are.
About your stay in Switzerland with that strange friend of yours: what did you gain in his company?

Q: Nothing absolutely.
His experience did not affect me at all.
One thing I have understood: there is nothing to search for.
Wherever I may go, nothing waits for me at the end of the journey.
Discovery is not the result of transportation.


M: Yes, you are quite apart from anything that can be gained or lost.

Q: Do you call it vairagya, relinquishment, renunciation?

M: There is nothing to renounce.
Enough if you stop acquiring.
To give you must have, and to have you must take.
Better don't take.
It is simpler than to practice renunciation, which leads to a dangerous form of 'spiritual' pride.
All this weighing, selecting, choosing, exchanging -- it is all shopping in some 'spiritual' market.
What is your business there?
What deal are you out to strike?
When you are not out for business, what is the use of this endless anxiety of choice?
Restlessness takes you nowhere.
Something prevents you from seeing that there is nothing you need.
Find it out and see its falseness.
It is like having swallowed some poison and suffering from unquenchable craving for water.
Instead of drinking beyond all measure, why not eliminate the poison and be free of this burning thirst?

Q: I shall have to eliminate the ego!

M: The sense 'I am a person in time and space' is the poison.
In a way, time itself is the poison.
In time all things come to an end and new are born, to be devoured in their turn.
Do not identify yourself with time, do not ask anxiously: 'what next, what next?
' Step out of time and see it devour the world.
Say: 'Well, it is in the nature of time to put an end to everything.
Let it be.
It does not concern me.
I am not combustible, nor do I need to collect fuel'.

Q: Can the witness be without the things to witness?

M: There is always something to witness.
If not a thing, then its absence.
Witnessing is natural and no problem.
The problem is excessive interest, leading to self-identification.
Whatever you are engrossed in you take to be real.

Q: Is the 'I am' real or unreal
Is the 'I am' the witness?
Is the witness real or unreal?


M: What is pure, unalloyed, unattached, is real.
What is tainted, mixed up, dependent and transient is unreal.
Do not be misled by words -- one word may convey several and even contradictory meanings.
The 'I am' that pursues the pleasant and shuns the unpleasant is false; the 'I am' that sees pleasure and pain as inseparable sees rightly.
The witness that is enmeshed in what he perceives is the person; the witness who stands aloof, unmoved and untouched, is the watch-tower of the real, the point at which awareness, inherent in the unmanifested, contacts the manifested.
There can be no universe without the witness, there can be no witness without the universe.

Q: Time consumes the world.
Who is the witness of time?


M: He who is beyond time -- the Un-nameable.
A glowing ember, moved round and round quickly enough, appears as a glowing circle.
When the movement ceases, the ember remains.
Similarly, the 'I am' in movement creates the world.
The 'I am' at peace becomes the Absolute.
You are like a man with an electric torch walking through a gallery.
You can see only what is within the beam.
The rest is in darkness.

Q: If I project the world, I should be able to change it.

M: Of course, you can.
But you must cease identifying yourself with it and go beyond.
Then you have the power to destroy and re-create.

Q: All I want is to be free.

M: You must know two things: What are you to be free from and what keeps you bound.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #730 on: August 30, 2015, 05:10:02 AM »

Do not try to become anything. Do nothing!
Without thinking on any of your words, remain quiet.
Once a word sprouts it creates a meaning and then you ride on it.
You follow the meanings of your words
and claim that you are in search of your self.
So be wakeful to that state which is prior to the sprouting of words.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #731 on: September 05, 2015, 12:13:53 AM »
Questioner: As a child fairly often I experienced states of complete happiness, verging on ecstasy:
later, they ceased, but since I came to India they reappeared, particularly after I met you. Yet these
states, however wonderful, are not lasting. They come and go and there is no knowing when they
will come back.


Maharaj: How can anything be steady in a mind which itself is not steady?

Q: How can I make my mind steady?

M: How can an unsteady mind make itself steady? Of course it cannot. It is the nature of the mind
to roam about. All you can do is to shift the focus of consciousness beyond the mind.

Q: How is it done?

M: Refuse all thoughts except one: the thought 'I am'. The mind will rebel in the beginning, but with
patience and perseverance it will yield and keep quiet. Once you are quiet, things will begin to
happen spontaneously and quite naturally without any interference on your part.

Q: Can I avoid this protracted battle with my mind?

M: Yes, you can. Just live your life as it comes, but alertly, watchfully, allowing everything to
happen as it happens, doing the natural things the natural way, suffering, rejoicing -- as life brings.
This also is a way.

Q: Well, then I can as well marry, have children, run a business? be happy.

M: Sure. You may or may not be happy, take it in your stride.

Q: Yet I want happiness.

M: True happiness cannot be found in things that change and pass away. Pleasure and pain
alternate inexorably. Happiness comes from the self and can be found in the self only. Find your
real self (swarupa) and all else will come with it.

Q: If my real self is peace and love, why is it so restless?

M: It is not your real being that is restless, but its reflection in the mind appears restless because
the mind is restless. It is just like the reflection of the moon in the water stirred by the wind. The
wind of desire stirs the mind and the 'me', which is but a reflection of the Self in the mind, appears
changeful. But these ideas of movement, of restlessness, of pleasure and pain are all in the mind.
The Self stands beyond the mind, aware, but unconcerned.

Q: How to reach it?

M: You are the Self, here and now Leave the mind alone, stand aware and unconcerned and you
will realise that to stand alert but detached, watching events come and go, is an aspect of your real
nature.

Q: What are the other aspects?

M: The aspects are infinite in number. Realise one, and you will realise all.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #732 on: September 08, 2015, 11:07:28 PM »
Q: We are attached to our personality. Our individuality, our being unlike others, we value very
much. You seem to denounce both as useless. Your unmanifested, of what use is it to us?


M: Unmanifested, manifested, individuality, personality (nirguna, saguna, vyakta, vyakti); all these
are mere words, points of view, mental attitudes. There is no reality in them. The real is experienced
in silence. You cling to personality -- but you are conscious of being a person only when you are in
trouble -- when you are not in trouble you do not think of yourself.

Q: You did not tell me the uses of the Unmanifested.

M: Surely, you must sleep in order to wake up. You must die in order to live, you must melt down to
shape anew. You must destroy to build, annihilate before creation. The Supreme is the universal
solvent, it corrodes every container, it burns through every obstacle. Without the absolute denial of
everything the tyranny of things would be absolute. The Supreme is the great harmoniser, the
guarantee of the ultimate and perfect balance -- of life in freedom. It dissolves you and thus reasserts
your true being.

Q: It is all well on its own level. But how does it work in daily life?

M: The daily life is a life of action. Whether you like it or not, you must function. Whatever you do
for your own sake accumulates and becomes explosive; one day it goes off and plays havoc with
you and your world. When you deceive yourself that you work for the good of all, it makes matters
worse, for you should not be guided by your own ideas of what is good for others. A man who
claims to know what is good for others, is dangerous.

Q: How is one to work then?

M: Neither for yourself nor for others, but for the work's own sake. A thing worth doing is its own
purpose and meaning, Make nothing a means to something else. Bind not. God does not create
one thing to serve another. Each is made for its own sake. Because it is made for itself, it does not
interfere. You are using things and people for purposes alien to them and you play havoc with the
world and yourself.

Q: Our real being is all the time with us, you say. How is it that we do not notice it?

M: Yes, you are always the Supreme. But your attention is fixed on things, physical or mental.
When your attention is off a thing and not yet fixed on another, in the interval you are pure being.
When through the practice of discrimination and detachment (viveka-vairagya), you lose sight of
sensory and mental states, pure being emerges as the natural state.

Q: How does one bring to an end this sense of separateness?

M: By focussing the mind on 'I am', on the sense of being, 'I am so-and-so' dissolves; "I am a
witness only" remains and that too submerges in 'I am all'. Then the all becomes the One and the
One -- yourself, not to be separate from me. Abandon the idea of a separate 'I' and the question of
'whose experience?' will not arise.

Q: You speak from your own experience. How can I make it mine?

M: You speak of my experience as different from your experience, because you believe we are
separate. But we are not. On a deeper level my experience is your experience. Dive deep within
yourself and you will find it easily and simply. Go in the direction of 'I am'.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #733 on: September 09, 2015, 11:22:13 PM »
Questioner: You say, reality is one. Oneness, unity, is the attribute of the person. Is then reality a
person, with the universe as its body?


Maharaj: Whatever you may say will be both true and false. Words do not reach beyond the mind.

Q: I am just trying to understand. You are telling us of the Person, the Self and the Supreme.
(vyakti, vyakta, avyakta). The light of Pure Awareness (pragna), focussed as 'I am' in the Self
(jivatma), as consciousness (chetana) illumines the mind (antahkarana) and as life (prana) vitalises
the body (deha). All this is fine as far as the words go. But when it comes to distinguishing in myself
the person from the Self and the Self from the Supreme, I get mixed up.


M: The person is never the subject. You can see a person, but you are not the person. You are
always the Supreme which appears at a given point of time and space as the witness, a bridge
between the pure awareness of the Supreme and the manifold consciousness of the person.

Q: When I look at myself, I find I am several persons fighting among themselves for the use of the
body.


M: They correspond to the various tendencies (samskara) of the mind.

Q: Can I make peace between them?

M: How can you? They are so contradictory! See them as they are -- mere habits of thoughts and
feelings, bundles of memories and urges.

Q: Yet they all say 'I am'.

M: It is only because you identify yourself with them. Once you realise that whatever appears
before you cannot be yourself, and cannot say 'I am', you are free of all your 'persons' and their
demands. The sense 'I am' is your own. You cannot part with it, but you can impart it to anything, as
in saying: I am young. I am rich etc. But such self-identifications are patently false and the cause of
bondage.

Q: I can now understand that I am not the person, but that which, when reflected in the person,
gives it a sense of being. Now, about the Supreme? In what way do I know myself as the Supreme?


M: The source of consciousness cannot be an object in consciousness. To know the source is to
be the source. When you realise that you are not the person, but the pure and calm witness, and
that fearless awareness is your very being, you are the being. It is the source, the Inexhaustible
Possibility.

Q: Are there many sources or one for all?

M: It depends how you look at it, from which end. The objects in the world are many, but the eye
that sees them is one. The higher always appears as one to the lower and the lower as many to the
higher.

Q: Shapes and names are all of one and the same God?

M: Again, it all depends on how you look at it. On the verbal level everything is relative. Absolutes
should be experienced, not discussed.

Q: How is the Absolute experienced?

M: It is not an object to be recognised and stored up in memory. It is in the present and in feeling
rather. It has more to do with the 'how' than with the 'what'. It is in the quality, in the value; being the
source of everything, it is in everything.

Q: If it is the source, why and how does it manifest itself?

M: It gives birth to consciousness. All else is in consciousness.

Q: Why are there so many centres of consciousness?

M: The objective universe (mahadakash) is in constant movement, projecting and dissolving
innumerable forms. Whenever a form is infused with life (prana), consciousness (chetana) appears
by reflection of awareness in matter.

Q: How is the Supreme affected?

M: What can affect it and how? The source is not affected by the vagaries of the river nor is the
metal -- by the shape of the jewellery. Is the light affected by the picture on the screen? The
Supreme makes everything possible, that is all.

Jewell

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Re: Quotes of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj
« Reply #734 on: September 15, 2015, 08:47:45 PM »
M: That which sees all this, and the nothing too, is the inner teacher. He alone is, all else only
appears to be. He is your own self (swarupa), your hope and assurance of freedom; find him and
cling to him and you will be saved and safe.

Q: I do believe you, but when it comes to the actual finding of this inner self, I find it escapes me.

M: The idea 'it escapes me', where does it arise?

Q: In the mind.

M: And who knows the mind.

Q: The witness of the mind knows the mind.

M: Did anybody come to you and say: 'I am the witness of your mind'?

Q: Of course not. He would have been just another idea in the mind.

M: Then who is the witness?

Q: I am.

M: So, you know the witness because you are the witness. You need not see the witness in front of
you. Here again, to be is to know.

Q: Yes, I see that I am the witness, the awareness itself. But in which way does it profit me?

M: What a question! What kind of profit do you expect? To know what you are, is it not good
enough?

Q: What are the uses of self-knowledge?

M: It helps you to understand what you are not and keeps you free from false ideas, desires and
actions.

Q: If I am the witness only, what do right and wrong matter?

M: What helps you to know yourself is right. What prevents, is wrong. To know one's real self is
bliss, to forget -- is sorrow.

Q: Is the witness-consciousness the real Self?

M: It is the reflection of the real in the mind (buddhi). The real is beyond. The witness is the door
through which you pass beyond.

Q: What is the purpose of meditation?

M: Seeing the false as the false, is meditation. This must go on all the time.

Q: We are told to meditate regularly.

M: Deliberate daily exercise in discrimination between the true and the false and renunciation of
the false is meditation. There are many kinds of meditation to begin with, but they all merge finally
into one.

Q: Please tell me which road to self-realisation is the shortest.

M: No way is short or long, but some people are more in earnest and some are less. I can tell you
about myself. I was a simple man, but I trusted my Guru. What he told me to do, I did. He told me to
concentrate on 'I am' -- I did. He told me that I am beyond all perceivables and conceivables -- I
believed. I gave him my heart and soul, my entire attention and the whole of my spare time (I had to
work to keep my family alive). As a result of faith and earnest application, I realised my self
(swarupa) within three years.
You may choose any way that suits you; your earnestness will determine the rate of progress.