Author Topic: Blog about Saiva Siddantham  (Read 6847 times)

akash8m

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
    • View Profile
Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« on: August 26, 2012, 05:24:55 AM »
My 80-year-old father is well versed with Saiva Siddantham topic and he is currently writing a blog on about it here. http://saivasiddantham.blogspot.com/2012/08/bliss-is-real-nature-of-soul.html

He lives in Annanagar, Chennai 600040. He gives daily lectures on Saiva Siddantha topics from 7 am to 8 am in Annanagar Tower, 7-days a week. If you have a chance you can also participate. It is a free meeting, they discuss various topics including Saiva Siddantha.

Hope they are useful for you all.

Thanks.

Ravi.N

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4013
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2012, 09:18:31 AM »
Akash,
Nice to know that your father (Sri Veerabadran?)has a blog on saiva Siddhanta and is giving talks.I downloaded his pdf book from Gumroad for USD2/-.There is a difficulty in sharing excerpts from it:For example,I will try copy pasting this excerpt:

பதி , ப மற மற மற ்�ம் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ �ன ்�ம் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம்"

Wonder why this is so.

The saiva Siddhanta line taken up here is propounded by Meikkandar-which posits Pati,pasu and Pasam to be coexistent and Eternal.

There is another school of Suddha saiva siddhanta as expounded in Tirumanthiram which is exactly the same as Advaita Vedanta school.I have posted a link to a talk:

http://www.himalayanacademy.com/resources/books/tirumantiram/GurudevaTalk.html

Here is an excerpt from this Talk:
"That is why we occasionally use the term "Advaita Saiva Siddhanta." It conveys our belief in the Siddhanta which has as its ultimate objective the Vedanta. It sets us apart from the Dvaita Saiva Siddhanta school of interpretation begun by Meykanda Devar which sees God and the soul as eternally separate, never completely unified. It is not unusual to find two schools, similar in most ways, yet differing on matters of theology. In fact, this has been true throughout history. It has its source in the approach to God. On the one hand you have the rishi, the yogi, the sage or siddhar who is immersed in his sadhana, deep into yoga which brings forth direct experience. His conclusions will always tend toward Advaita, toward a fully non-dual perception. It isn't even a belief. It is the philosophical aftermath of experience. Most Sat Gurus and those who follow the monastic path will hold firmly to the precepts of Advaita Saiva Siddhanta. On the other hand there are the philosophers, the scholars, the pundits. Relying not on experience and ignoring yoga, they must surmise, postulate, arrange and rearrange concepts through an intricate intellectual process in an effort to reason out what God must be like. These are not infrequently the Grahastras and their reasoning leads them to one or another form of Dvaita Saiva Siddhanta. These are both valid schools. They are both traditional schools, and comparisons are odious. But they are very different one from the other, and it is good that we understand those differences."

Perhaps your father may find it interesting or may already be familiar with this alternative line of Saiva Siddhanta.

Thanks very much.

Namaskar.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43540
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2012, 02:18:59 PM »
Dear akash8, Ravi,

Yes. When Saiva Siddhanta speaks of eternality of God and soul, then it becomes different from Advaita. Because Advaita
says both God/Self and the jiva are one and the same and jiva appears to be different due to ego. When this ego is conquered,
then jiva attains the Self-hood. The two schools merge as Sri Bhagavan said, 'when the mind merges with the Self within'.
Then such a sadhaka who has experienced non dual consciousness would understand that only God/Siva/Self is eternal.

Tiru Jnana Sambandhar says in his first verse itself, 'He has stolen my mind'. In other words, there is no mind/ego if the
Grace of Siva is earned. This means the poet has conquered his mind/ego and he attained Siva-hood.

Arunachala Siva.   
     

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43540
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2012, 05:14:31 PM »
Dear akash8m,

Kindly go through this brief article and it will be interest to you.


Why is Advaita the ultimate state ?

The state of advaita is proclaimed to be the ultimate state to be. Why ? advaita translates to non-duality. That is a state in which the soul (pashu) does not feel any different from the Supreme (pati).

In the world the fear is the major component that affects the human life. An insect is threatened by a frog. The frog is worried about the snake. The snake gets frightened by the human hunters. The hunters are worried about their livelihood ! The same way a worker is worried about pleasing the manager and the owner about the government and market and the head of government about retaining the post ! This is a vicious circle.

One of the other thing could be the hunt for fame. One feels that he/she should command the respect of others in some way or the other. When that is achieved the person find out that there are taller mountains beyond the cliff already reached to pursue ! Keep getting promoted and promoted step by step - to end where ?

There could be many others one could imagine - the pursuit of better things. The ultimate thing to look for would be - to be the one that is ultimate ! The one that is does not have any superior element that could bully, the one that does not have external dependency to be happy, the one beyond which there can be nothing higher ! If we become that one, that is where going to be the point of completion. It is the Supreme Almighty ever Blissful - the One that qualifies for that ultimate thing. Being the favored of that Being would eliminate the fear and worry of everything else as the favor of the Almighty is there. Still isn't that one short ? There is still One Being to look up to and due to the fact that It is superior there is a fear, though with respect, for It. If the self unifies in that Supreme without recognizing itself to be anything other than the Supreme, the result would be just bliss - no strings attached ! This is the state of non-duality advaita.

Note:
The word advaita is used in this article more widely. (The upaniShat proclaim aham brahmAsmi). Not necessarily in the context of the advaita popularized by shankara bhagavatpAda.

Posted On : 31.12.2002

Arunachala Siva.

akash8m

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2012, 05:20:24 PM »
Akash,
Nice to know that your father (Sri Veerabadran?)has a blog on saiva Siddhanta and is giving talks.I downloaded his pdf book from Gumroad for USD2/-.There is a difficulty in sharing excerpts from it:For example,I will try copy pasting this excerpt:

பதி , ப மற மற மற ்�ம் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ ் பாசம் எ �ன ்�ம் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம் நிைலத்இ ் என்� ம்"

Wonder why this is so.

The saiva Siddhanta line taken up here is propounded by Meikkandar-which posits Pati,pasu and Pasam to be coexistent and Eternal.

There is another school of Suddha saiva siddhanta as expounded in Tirumanthiram which is exactly the same as Advaita Vedanta school.I have posted a link to a talk:

http://www.himalayanacademy.com/resources/books/tirumantiram/GurudevaTalk.html

Here is an excerpt from this Talk:
"That is why we occasionally use the term "Advaita Saiva Siddhanta." It conveys our belief in the Siddhanta which has as its ultimate objective the Vedanta. It sets us apart from the Dvaita Saiva Siddhanta school of interpretation begun by Meykanda Devar which sees God and the soul as eternally separate, never completely unified. It is not unusual to find two schools, similar in most ways, yet differing on matters of theology. In fact, this has been true throughout history. It has its source in the approach to God. On the one hand you have the rishi, the yogi, the sage or siddhar who is immersed in his sadhana, deep into yoga which brings forth direct experience. His conclusions will always tend toward Advaita, toward a fully non-dual perception. It isn't even a belief. It is the philosophical aftermath of experience. Most Sat Gurus and those who follow the monastic path will hold firmly to the precepts of Advaita Saiva Siddhanta. On the other hand there are the philosophers, the scholars, the pundits. Relying not on experience and ignoring yoga, they must surmise, postulate, arrange and rearrange concepts through an intricate intellectual process in an effort to reason out what God must be like. These are not infrequently the Grahastras and their reasoning leads them to one or another form of Dvaita Saiva Siddhanta. These are both valid schools. They are both traditional schools, and comparisons are odious. But they are very different one from the other, and it is good that we understand those differences."

Perhaps your father may find it interesting or may already be familiar with this alternative line of Saiva Siddhanta.

Thanks very much.

Namaskar.

Thank you for your comment and purchase, it was written using Baraha software, and then converted to PDF, hence the letter appears different. If you have any questions related to this topic please send him an email he will answer at thangamveerbadran @ gmail.com (without the spaces).

akash8m

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2012, 05:22:04 PM »
Dear akash8, Ravi,

Yes. When Saiva Siddhanta speaks of eternality of God and soul, then it becomes different from Advaita. Because Advaita
says both God/Self and the jiva are one and the same and jiva appears to be different due to ego. When this ego is conquered,
then jiva attains the Self-hood. The two schools merge as Sri Bhagavan said, 'when the mind merges with the Self within'.
Then such a sadhaka who has experienced non dual consciousness would understand that only God/Siva/Self is eternal.

Tiru Jnana Sambandhar says in his first verse itself, 'He has stolen my mind'. In other words, there is no mind/ego if the
Grace of Siva is earned. This means the poet has conquered his mind/ego and he attained Siva-hood.

Arunachala Siva.   
   
Thank you Mr. Subramanian, it will be interesting to hear you two discuss. Wish we had more of this in our modern lives. Thank you.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43540
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2012, 05:40:16 PM »
Dear akash8m,

This article on Siva Jnana Bodham will also be of interest to you. 

Siva Jnana  Bodham :

 No words will suffice to introduce the book to the public. The original work is regarded as the Muthal Nul, Revealed book of the Saiva Religion and Siddhanta Philosophy. When I first began the translation, I was rather diffident about the sort of reception it will meet with in the hands of the public; but, since, I have been able to discuss some of the subjects herein contained with many intelligent persons, belonging to all shades of opinion, Hindu and Christian and all of them have spoken appreciatively of the work. I have also received assurances from several valued friends about the importance of the work. Besides, from the facts I set out below, I am led to believe that the time of appearance of this book is quite opportune. Within the last two or three weeks I have come across three important publications, which have prepared the public mind, here and in England, for an appreciative study of the Tamil, Moral, Religious and Philosophical writings. I refer to the Rev. Doctor G. U. Pope’s paper on ‘Ethics of Modern Hinduism’, Professor P. Sundram Pillai’s ‘some milestones in the History of Tamil Literature’ or ‘The age of Tirugnana Sambantha’ and the recent article of the Rev. G. M. Cobban in the Contemporary Review, entitled ‘Latent Religion of India’. Of these, ‘Some milestone’ contain an elaborate critical resume of the History of the Saiva Literature in Tamil from the 5th century down to the 13th century ; and the other contributions contain a review of the Saiva Ethics and Religion and Philosophy of about the same period. Doctor Pope in referring to the Tamil Kural observes, “In this great and ancient language, there exists among much else, that is interesting and valuable, an ethical treatise, not surpassed (as far as I know) by anything of the kind in any literature”. And in pages 3 and 4 of his paper, he discusses the Siddhanta doctrine of the three Padarthas, Pathi, Pasu and Pasa, on which this Ethics is based. And in the end, the Rev. Doctor is forced to confess, even after making all sorts of reservations and qualifications that “it is evident from what has been said above, we have in Southern India, the outlines at least of a doctrine of ethics, which in a Christian point of view is nearly unexceptionable”. And he is good enough to add, ‘to meet thoughtful Hindus in a spirit of dogmatic antagonism, or to treat them with contempt or to speak of them as the perishing heathen is absolutely unfitting. We have even something to learn from Hinduism’. But the deeply implanted prejudice lingers, and it leads him to say that truth found in the Kural must have been derived from a Christian source. The Rev. G. M. Cobban is more generous in this respect. He says, “First I think we should insist on the cordial recognition of these truths, and cheerfully acknowledge their kinship to Christianity, for all truth is akin. The Hindu poet knows what to say of it. He says ‘the heart is made pure by the truth’. If I am asked whence these truths came, I would say from Heaven, from Him who is the Truth. But, whether they are the direct gifts of God to the Hindus, or whether as boulders, they have drifted and have travelled to India, I cannot tell; the evidence on this point is incomplete. If any urge that, although Hindus recognize their authority, they are uninspired, and not really authoritative, I would say truth is authoritative, because it is truth, not because it came in a particular way. And all truth is from God”. The Siddhantis not only believe that ‘the heart is made pure by truth’, but that no truth should be thought as faulty, even if it is found in an alien book.

   "அந்நிய நூலின் விதி யவிரோதமேல்,
   உன்னேல் பழுதென்றுளத்து"
The article in question, after reviewing briefly the attitude of Missionaries towards Hinduism from time to time proceeds to state, “we find much truth both in books and men; so Christian teacher”. The article gives a brief summary of the Siddhanta doctrines and quotations from nearly all the Siddhanta Sastras and other works referred to by me in the body of the work. After these quotations, follow a remark, “If we give to the truths enumerated and illustrated above, our careful consideration, we shall admit that they indicate a clear advance on the teaching of the Vedas or the Pantheism of the Upanishads”. But that is an issue raised between Siddhantis and other Vedantists as to what the Vedas and Upanishads really teach, which I explain further in my introduction. I am afraid that Hinduism has lost more than what it has gained by an onesided representation from within and from without; by translating and publishing such works and interpretations only as accord with the Idealistic School of Hindu Philosophy. No doubt the truth is here, but not in the latent condition as the Rev. Gentleman supposes. This is the truth which has been taught to me and which I have learned from my earliest years; and neither my parents nor my teachers have ever taught me to mistake a stock or a stone for God. The truth is here and it is not kept concealed as is supposed; and the words have gone forth, thrice,

   (1) "ஒன்றாய்ப் பலவாய் வுயிர்க்குயிராய்,
   ஆடுங்கருணைப் பரஞ்சோதி யருளைப் பெறுதர்கு அன்புநிலை,
   தேடும் பருவமிது கண்டீர் சேரவாரும் சகத்தீரே."

   (2) "பொய்வந் துழலும் சமயநெறி புகுத வேண்டாம் முத்திதரும்
   தெய்வ சபையைக் காண்பதற்குச் சேரவாரும் சகத்தீரே."

   (3) "அகண்டாகாரசிவ போக மெனும் பேரின்ப வெள்ளம் பொங்கித்
   ததும்பிப் பூரணமாய்,

   ஏகவுருவாய்க் கிடக்குதையோ, வின்புற்றிட நாமெடுத்த
   தேகம் விழுமுன் புசிப்பதற்குச் சேரவாரும் சகத்தீரே."
and let them who have ears to hear, hear.

The worst feature of modern Hinduism is pointed out to be its idolatry; and the Rev. Gentleman would persist in calling it the substitute for truth and not truth’s symbol. I have discussed the pros and cons of this question in my notes to the Sixth Sutra; and so much prejudice and ignorance prevail in regard to this question, that all that I would crave for, is a fair and patient hearing. I refer the reader also to an excellent Tamil book brought out by Sri la Sri Somasundara Nayagar Avergal of Madras entitled ‘Archadipam’ in which this question is also more fully treated.

(1) O! Come Ye together from all parts of this world! See, this is the time for finding that condition of Love which will secure us the Arul (Grace) of that Gracious, and Supreme Light, which is One, which is All, and which is the Life of life.

(2) O! Come Ye together, to see the Divine Presence, which will give Moksha; and don’t enter the paths of those religions which wallow in untruth.

(3) Oh! That Great Flood of Joy of Limitless Sivabhoga is rising and flowing over; and It is filling everything and yet remains One! Come Ye together to partake of It, and obtain bliss, before ever our bodies perish!

Before concluding, I cannot resist the temptation of indulging in one more extract from the valuable article of the Rev. G. M. Cobban, the appropriateness of which the readers will easily perceive.

The twelve slokas, the Hindu fakir referred to may or may not be the twelve Sutras of Sivagnanabotha, but nevertheless, the above remarks are equally appropriate.

Compare the words of Thayumanavar in praise of the author of Sivagnana Siddhi,

 
   "பாதிவிருத் தத்தாலிப் பார்விருத்த மாகவுண்மை,
   சாதித்தார் பொன்னடியைத் தான் பணிவ தெந்நாளோ,"
“O for the day ! when I can worship the golden feet of him who declared the truth, in half a stanza by which I lost all my illusions.”

In conclusion, I have to tender my thanks to Pandit Murugesam Pillai Avergal, who assisted me in my study of the Tamil Commentaries and to M. R. Ry. Tandalam Balasundram Mudaliar Avergal, who rendered invaluable help by his suggestions etc., while these sheets were passing through the Press and to Messrs. G. Ramaswamy Chetty & Co., who have displayed very great care and taste in the get up of the book.

 
Introduction:
 - - - - - -

The system of Hindu Philosophy which is expounded in the following pages, and its name will be altogether new to many an English educated Hindu who is content to learn his religion and philosophy from English books and translations and from such scraps as turn up in newspapers and magazines and from such scraps as turn up in newspapers and magazines. Yet it is the Philosophy of the Religion in which at least every Tamil speaking Hindu is more or less brought up and the one Philosophy which obtains predominance in the Tamil Languages. This Philosophy is called The Siddhanta Philosophy and is the special Philosophy of the Saiva Religion. The word means True End, and as used in logic, it means the proposition or theory proved as distinguished from the proposition or theory refuted, which becomes the Purvapaksham. The Saiva Philosophy is so called as it establishes the True End or the only Truth and all other systems are merely Purvapakshams. The system is based primarily on the Saiva Agamas. But the authority of the Vedas is equally accepted and the system is then called Vedanta Philosophy or Vedanta Siddhantha Philosophy or Vaithika Philosophy.

   "வேதாந்த சித்தாந்த சமரச நன்னிலை பெற்ற,
   வித்தகச் சித்தர் கணமே."
   "ராஜாங்கத்தில் அமர்ந்தது வைதிக சைவ மழகிதந்தோ."
Thayumanavar). This Philosophy is also spoken of as Adwaitha Philosophy in all the Tamil works and it will be seen from the very large use of the word and its exposition in almost every page of this work what important part it plays; and it strikes, in fact, the key not of the whole system. Meikanda Devar who translated and commented on Sivagnana Botham is called “Adwaitha Meikandan” (அத்துவித மெய்கண்டான், one who saw the Truth of Adwaitha) by Thayumanavar. However it is the Agama which gives the Philosophy its form and language. Very absurd notions are entertained of the Agamas or Tantras, specially derived from the low practices of the Right-hand followers or Vamabahinis of Bengal and proceeding from ignorance of the real works, through want of published books and translations. The books followed by the Left-hand Section or South Indian Sects are altogether different and I give a list of them below. Very little notice is taken of them by Oriental Scholars and of the existing works the Karma Kanda are alone preserved to us. There are several of these works in the great Mutt at Thiruvavaduthurai ; and an excellent commentary on one of the Upagamas, Paushkara, by Umapathisivacharya is also preserved there. Like the Veda or Mantra, the Agama or Tantra is divided into Karma Kanda and Gnana Kanda and there were a large number of Upagamas corresponding to Upanishads, of which Mrigendra is very largely quoted by Sayanacharya in his Sarvadarsana Sangraha. The true relation of the Agama to the Veda is pointed out by Swami Vivekananda in his address to the Madras people and I quote his observations below. “The Tantras as we have said, represent the ‘Vedic rituals’ in a modified form, and before any one jumps into the most absurd conclusions about them, I will advise him to read the Tantras portion. And most of the ‘Mantras’ used in the ‘Tantras’ will be found taken verbatim from these ‘Brahmanas.’ As to theirinfluene, apart from the ‘Srouta’ and ‘Smarta’ rituals, all other forms of ritual observed from the Himalayas to the Comorin have been taken from the ‘Tantras’ and they direct the worship of the Saktas, the Saivas, the Vaishnavas and all others alike.”

I am also informed that the sources of the rules for the rituals followed by Smartas and which are now taken from some manuals and compilations of very recent origin are really found in the Agamas or Tantras. However, the Agamas are held in very high repute by the Non-Smartha populations of Southern India; and the Agama is as much held to be the word of the Deity as the Veda, the word literally meaning “The Revealed Word.”

Says Saint Thirumular:-

   "வேதமொடு ஆகமம் மெய்யாம் இறைவனூல்
   ஓதும் பொதுவும் சிறப்பு மென்றுன்னுக
   நாதன் உரையிவை நாடில் இரண்டந்தம்
   பேதம தென்னில் பெரியோர்க்க பேதமே."
“The Vedas and Agamas are both of them true, both being the word of the Lord. Think that the first is a general treatise and the latter a special one. Both form the word of God. When examined, and where difference is perceived between Vedanta and Siddhanta, the great will perceive no such difference.”

Says Sri Nilakanta Charya:-

   “Vayanthu Vedasivagamayorbhedam,
   Napasyamaha Vedopisivagamaha.”
(I don’t perceive any difference between the Veda and the Sivagama. The Veda itself is the Sivagama.)



Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43540
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2012, 06:46:17 PM »
Dear akash8m,

This is Siva Jnana Bodham, the brief meanings of all twelve Sutras composed by Maikandar, translated in English.
This will be of interest to you.

SIVAGNANA BOTHAM
in English
- - - - - ----------------

I. As the (seen) universe, spoken of as he, she and it, undergoes three changes (origin, development, and decay), this must be an entity created (by an efficient cause.) This entity owing to its conjunction with Anava Mala has to emanate from Hara to whom it returns during Samharam. Hence, the learned say that Hara is the first cause.

II. He is one with the souls (Abetha). He is different from them (Betha). He is one and different from them (Bethabetha). He stands in Samavaya union with His Gnana Sakti and causes the souls to undergo the processes of evolution (births) and return (Samharam) by including their good and bad acts (Karma).

III. It rejects every portion of the body as not being itself; It says my body; it is conscious of dreams; it exists in sleep without feeling pleasure or pain or movements; it knows from others; This is the soul which exists in the body formed as a machine from Maya.

IV. The soul is not one of the Andakarana. It is not conscious when it is in conjunction with Anavamala. It becomes conscious only when it meets the Andakarana, just as a king understands through his ministers. The relation of the soul to the five Avastha is also similar.

V. The senses while perceiving the object cannot perceive themselves or the soul; and they are perceived by soul. Similarly, the soul while perceiving cannot perceive itself (while thinking cannot think thought) and God. It is moved by the Arul Sakti of God, as the magnet moves the iron, while Himself remains immoveable or unchangeable.

VI. That which is perceived by the senses is Asat (changeable.) That which is not so perceived does not exist. God is neither the one nor the other, and hence called Siva Sat or Chit Sat by the wise; Chit or Siva when not understood by the human intelligence and Sat when perceived with divine wisdom.

VII. In the presence of Sat, every thing else (cosmos-Asat) is Sunyam (is non-apparent) Hence Sat cannot perceive Asat. As Asat does not exist, it cannot perceive Sat. That which perceives both cannot be either of them. This is the Soul (called Satasat).

VIII. The Lord appearing as Guru to the Soul which had advanced in Tapas (Virtue and Knowledge) instructs him that he has wasted himself by living among the savages of the five senses; and on this, the soul, understanding its real nature leaves its former associates, and not being different from Him, becomes united to His Feet.

IX. The soul, on perceiving in itself with. The eye of Gnanam, the Lord who cannot be perceived by the human intellect or senses, and on giving up the world (Pasa) by knowing it to be false as a mirage, will find its rest in the Lord. Let the soul contemplate Sri Panchatchara according to Law.

X. As the lord becomes one with the Soul in its human condition, so let the Soul become one with Him and perceive all its actions to be His. Then will it lose all its Mala, Maya, and Karma.

XI. As the soul enables the eye to see and itself sees, so Hara enables the soul to know and itself knows. And this Adwaitha knowledge and undying Love will unite it to His Feet.

XII. Let the Jivatma, after washing off its Mala which separates it from the strong Lotus feet of the Lord and mixing in the society of Bhaktas (Jivan Muktas) whose souls abound with Love, having lost dark ignorance, contemplate their Forms and the Forms in the temples as His Form.

Arunachala Siva.

akash8m

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 13
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2012, 02:33:29 AM »
Dear akash8m,

This is Siva Jnana Bodham, the brief meanings of all twelve Sutras composed by Maikandar, translated in English.
This will be of interest to you.

SIVAGNANA BOTHAM
in English
- - - - - ----------------

I. As the (seen) universe, spoken of as he, she and it, undergoes three changes (origin, development, and decay), this must be an entity created (by an efficient cause.) This entity owing to its conjunction with Anava Mala has to emanate from Hara to whom it returns during Samharam. Hence, the learned say that Hara is the first cause.

II. He is one with the souls (Abetha). He is different from them (Betha). He is one and different from them (Bethabetha). He stands in Samavaya union with His Gnana Sakti and causes the souls to undergo the processes of evolution (births) and return (Samharam) by including their good and bad acts (Karma).

III. It rejects every portion of the body as not being itself; It says my body; it is conscious of dreams; it exists in sleep without feeling pleasure or pain or movements; it knows from others; This is the soul which exists in the body formed as a machine from Maya.

IV. The soul is not one of the Andakarana. It is not conscious when it is in conjunction with Anavamala. It becomes conscious only when it meets the Andakarana, just as a king understands through his ministers. The relation of the soul to the five Avastha is also similar.

V. The senses while perceiving the object cannot perceive themselves or the soul; and they are perceived by soul. Similarly, the soul while perceiving cannot perceive itself (while thinking cannot think thought) and God. It is moved by the Arul Sakti of God, as the magnet moves the iron, while Himself remains immoveable or unchangeable.

VI. That which is perceived by the senses is Asat (changeable.) That which is not so perceived does not exist. God is neither the one nor the other, and hence called Siva Sat or Chit Sat by the wise; Chit or Siva when not understood by the human intelligence and Sat when perceived with divine wisdom.

VII. In the presence of Sat, every thing else (cosmos-Asat) is Sunyam (is non-apparent) Hence Sat cannot perceive Asat. As Asat does not exist, it cannot perceive Sat. That which perceives both cannot be either of them. This is the Soul (called Satasat).

VIII. The Lord appearing as Guru to the Soul which had advanced in Tapas (Virtue and Knowledge) instructs him that he has wasted himself by living among the savages of the five senses; and on this, the soul, understanding its real nature leaves its former associates, and not being different from Him, becomes united to His Feet.

IX. The soul, on perceiving in itself with. The eye of Gnanam, the Lord who cannot be perceived by the human intellect or senses, and on giving up the world (Pasa) by knowing it to be false as a mirage, will find its rest in the Lord. Let the soul contemplate Sri Panchatchara according to Law.

X. As the lord becomes one with the Soul in its human condition, so let the Soul become one with Him and perceive all its actions to be His. Then will it lose all its Mala, Maya, and Karma.

XI. As the soul enables the eye to see and itself sees, so Hara enables the soul to know and itself knows. And this Adwaitha knowledge and undying Love will unite it to His Feet.

XII. Let the Jivatma, after washing off its Mala which separates it from the strong Lotus feet of the Lord and mixing in the society of Bhaktas (Jivan Muktas) whose souls abound with Love, having lost dark ignorance, contemplate their Forms and the Forms in the temples as His Form.

Arunachala Siva.

Thank you Mr. R. Subramanian.

Subramanian.R

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43540
    • View Profile
Re: Blog about Saiva Siddantham
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2012, 07:44:28 PM »
Dear akash8m,

There is a blog called www.Shaivam.org. This gives all the tirumurais, the stories of 63 Saints, Sastra Canons like Siva
Jnana Bodham, Sivajnana Siddhiyar etc.., It is a neat blog having special articles too.

Arunachala Siva.