Author Topic: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days  (Read 34371 times)

ksksat27

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clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« on: April 27, 2012, 10:18:39 AM »
Dear Shri Ravi

Swami Vivekananda is a spiritual gaint who made Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and Sarada Devi known to millions and millions of crying souls like me .  The two were A, B, Cs for many who start with spiritual path.

But somebody brought about his last days regret episode.  Not only in this forum,  few of my relatives told a similar thing that he regreted and became very sorry for what he did .

I think you are the best person to post what happened exactly,  what is actually true in the books released ,  what was Swamiji's last day messages,  how come this misconception is floating around among even people who are really not doubtful of Swamji's state but neverthelss carry this misconception.

May be you can quote from his complete works or whatever and explain everybody here.

Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2012, 09:34:41 PM »
Krishna,
Swamiji was intensely Human and a very very unique personality.No one understood him like Sri Ramakrishna,and it is enough if we read what he has said about Swamiji.Truly a colossus.
I will however post the story of the Great Swami's last days.We may easily see the Truth for what it is:
"One of the lay disciples pointed out the difficulty of establishing unity and harmony
among the diverse sects in India. Vivekananda replied with irritation:
'Don't come here any more if you think any task too difficult. Through the grace of the
Lord, everything becomes easy of achievement. Your duty is to serve the poor and the
distressed without distinction of caste and creed. What business have you to consider
the fruits of your action? Your duty is to go on working, and everything will set itself
right in time, and work by itself. My method of work is to construct, and not to destroy
that which is already existing....You are all intelligent boys and profess to be my
disciples — tell me what you have done. Couldn't you give away one life for the sake
of others? Let the reading of Vedanta and the practice of meditation and the like be left
for the next life! Let this body go in the service of others — and then I shall know you
have not come to me in vain!'
A little later he said:
'After so much tapasya, austerity, I have known that the highest truth is this: "He is
present in all beings. These are all the manifested forms of Him. There is no other God
to seek for! He alone is worshipping God, who serves all beings."'
In this exhortation is found Vivekananda's message in all its vividness. These words
are addressed to India and the Western world alike. The west, too, has its pariahs. He
who exploits another man, near or distant, offends God and will pay for it sooner or
later. All men are sons of the same God, all bear within them the same God. He who
wishes to serve must serve man — and in the first instance, man in the humblest,
poorest, most degraded form. Only by breaking down the barriers between man and
man can one usher in the kingdom of heaven on earth.
There were moments when Vivekananda felt gloomy. His body was wasting away, and
only a few young men came forward to help him in his work. He wanted more of them
who, fired with indomitable faith in God and in themselves, would renounce
everything for the welfare of others. He used to say that with a dozen such people he
could divert into a new channel the whole thought-current of the country. Disregarding
his physical suffering, he constantly inspired his disciples to cultivate this new faith.
Thus we see him, one day, seated on a canvas cot under the mango tree in the
courtyard of the monastery. Sannyasins and brahmacharins about him were busy doing
their daily duties. One was sweeping the courtyard with a big broom. Swami
Premananda, after his bath, was climbing the steps to the shrine. Suddenly Swami
Vivekananda's eyes became radiant. Shaking with emotion, he said to a disciple:
'Where will you go to seek Brahman? He is immanent in all beings. Here, here is the
visible Brahman! Shame on those who, neglecting the visible Brahman, set their minds
on other things! Here is the visible Brahman before you as tangible as a fruit in one's
hand! Can't you see? Here — here — is Brahman!'
These words struck those around him with a kind of electric shock. For a quarter of an
hour they remained glued to the spot, as if petrified. The broom in the hand of the
sweeper stopped. Premananda fell into a trance. Everyone experienced an
indescribable peace. At last the Swami said to Premananda, 'Now go to worship.'
The brother disciples tried to restrain the Swami's activities, especially instruction to
visitors and seekers. But he was unyielding. 'Look here!' he said to them one day.
'What good is this body? Let it go in helping others. Did not the Master preach until the
very end? And shall I not do the same? I do not care a straw if the body goes. You
cannot imagine how happy I am when I find earnest seekers after truth to talk to. In the
work of waking up Atman in my fellow men I shall gladly die again and again!'"

continued....


Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2012, 09:39:20 PM »
The Story of Swami Vivekananda's Last Days continued...
Till the very end the Swami remained the great leader of the monastery, guiding with a
firm hand the details of its daily life, in spite of his own suffering. He insisted upon
thorough cleanliness and examined the beds to see that they were aired and properly
taken care of. He drew up a weekly time-table and saw that it was scrupulously
observed. The classes on the Vedas and the Puranas were held daily, he himself
conducting them when his health permitted. He discouraged too much ritualism in the
chapel. He warned the monks against exaggerated sentimentalism and narrow
sectarianism.
But the leader kept a stern watch on the practice of daily meditation on the part of the
inmates of the monastery. The bell sounded at fixed hours for meals, study, discussion,
and meditation. About three months before his death he made it a rule that at four
o'clock in the morning a hand-bell should be rung from room to room to awaken the
monks. Within half an hour all should be gathered in the chapel to meditate. But he
was always before them. He got up at three and went to the chapel, where he sat facing
the north, meditating motionless for more than two hours. No one was allowed to leave
his seat before the Swami set the example. As he got up, he chanted softly, 'Siva! Siva!'
Bowing to the image of Sri Ramakrishna, he would go downstairs and pace the
courtyard, singing a song about the Divine Mother or Siva. Naturally his presence in
the chapel created an intense spiritual atmosphere. Swami Brahmananda said: 'Ah! One
at once becomes absorbed if one sits for meditation in company with Naren! I do not
feel this when I sit alone.'
Once, after an absence of several days on account of illness, he entered the chapel and
found only two monks there. He became annoyed; in order to discipline the absentees
he forbade them to eat their meals at the monastery. They had to go out and beg their
food. He did not spare anyone, even a beloved brother disciple for whom he cherished
the highest respect and who happened to be absent from the chapel that morning.
Another day, he found a brother disciple, Swami Shivananda, in bed at the hour of
meditation. He said to the latter 'Brother! I know you do not need meditation. You
have already realized the highest goal through the grace of Sri Ramakrishna. But you
should daily meditate with the youngsters in order to set an example to them.'
From that day on, Shivananda, whether ill or well, always communed with God during
the early hours of the morning. In his old age, when it became physically impossible
for him to go to the chapel, he used to sit on his bed for meditation."

continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2012, 09:49:12 PM »
The story of Swami Vivekananda's last Days continued...
But the Swami, preoccupied as he was with the training of his Indian disciples, never
forgot his Western ones. Their welfare, too, was always in his thought and prayer.
To Miss MacLeod he wrote on June 14, 1901:
Well, Joe, keep health and spirits up....Gloire et honneur await you — and mukti. The
natural ambition of woman is, through marriage, to climb up leaning upon a man; but
those days are gone. You shall be great without the help of any man, just as you are,
plain, dear Joe — our Joe, everlasting Joe....
We have seen enough of this life not to care for any of its bubbles, have we not, Joe?
For months I have been practising to drive away all sentiments; therefore I stop here,
and good-bye just now. It was ordained by Mother that we should work together; it has
been already for the good of many; it shall be for the good of many more. So let it be.
It is useless planning useless high flights; Mother will find her own way...rest assured.
To Mary Hale, on August 27, 1901 he wrote with his usual wit:
I would that my health were what you expected — at least to be able to write you a
long letter. It is getting worse, in fact, every day — and so many complications and
botherations without that, I have ceased to notice it at all.
I wish you all joy in your lovely Suisse chalet — splendid health, good appetite, and a
light study of Swiss or other antiquities just to liven things up a bit. I am so glad that
you are breathing the free air of the mountains, but sorry that Sam is not in the best of
health. Well, there is no anxiety about it; he has naturally such a fine physique.
'Woman's moods and man's luck — the gods themselves do not know, not to speak of
men.' My instincts may be very feminine — but what I am exercised with just this
moment is that you get a little bit of manliness about you. Oh! Mary, your brain,
health, beauty, everything, is going to waste just for the lack of that one essential —
assertion of individuality. Your haughtiness, spirit, etc. are all nonsense — only
mockery. You are at best a boarding-school girl — no backbone! no backbone!
Alas! this lifelong leading-string business ! This is very harsh, very brutal — but I can't
help it. I love you, Mary — sincerely, genuinely. I can't cheat you with namby-pamby
sugar candies. Nor do they ever come to me.
Then again, I am a dying man; I have no time to fool in. Wake up, girl! I expect now
from you letters of the right slashing order. Give it right straight — I need a good deal
of rousing....
I am in a sense a retired man. I don't keep much note of what is going on about the
Movement. Then the Movement is getting bigger and it is impossible for one man to
know all about it minutely. I now do nothing except try to eat and sleep and nurse my
body the rest of the time.
Good-bye, dear Mary. Hope we shall meet again somewhere in this life — but meeting
or no meeting, I remain ever your loving brother, Vivekananda."

To his beloved disciple Nivedita he wrote on February 12, 1902: 'May all powers come
unto you! May Mother Herself be your hands and mind! It is immense power —
irresistible — that I pray for you, and, if possible, along with it infinite peace.... 'If
there was any truth in Sri Ramakrishna, may He take you into His leading, even as He
did me, nay, a thousand times more!'
And again, to Miss MacLeod: 'I can't, even in imagination, pay the immense debt of
gratitude I owe you. Wherever you are you never forget my welfare; and there, you are
the only one that bears all my burdens, all my brutal outbursts....'

continued....


Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2012, 09:54:15 PM »
The Story of Swami Vivekananda continued...
The sun, enveloped
in a golden radiance, was fast descending to the horizon. The last two months of the
Swami's life on earth had been full of events foreshadowing the approaching end. Yet
few had thought the end so near.
Soon after his return from Varanasi the Swami greatly desired to see his sannyasin
disciples and he wrote to them to come to the Belur Math, even if only for a short time.
'Many of his disciples from distant parts of the world,' writes Sister Nivedita, 'gathered
round the Swami. Ill as he looked, there was none probably who suspected how near
the end had come. Yet visits were paid and farewells exchanged that it had needed
voyages half round the world to make.'
More and more the Swami was seen to free himself from all responsibilities, leaving
the work to other hands. 'How often,' he said, 'does a man ruin his disciples by
remaining always with them ! When men are once trained, it is essential that their
leader leave them, for without his absence they cannot develop themselves.' 'Plants,' he
had said some time before, 'always remain small under a big tree.' Yet the near and
dear ones thought that he would certainly live three or four years more.
He refused to express any opinion on the question of the day. 'I can no more enter into
outside affairs,' he said; 'I am already on the way.' On another occasion he said: 'You
may be right; but I cannot enter any more into these matters. I am going down into
death.' News of the world met with but a far-away rejoinder from him.
On May 15, 1902, he wrote to Miss MacLeod, perhaps for the last time: 'I am
somewhat better, but of course far from what I expected. A great idea of quiet has
come upon me. I am going to retire for good — no more work for me. If possible, I
will revert to my old days of begging. All blessings attend you, Joe; you have been a
good angel to me.'
But it was difficult for him to give up what had been dearer to him than his life: the
work. On the last Sunday before the end he said to one of his disciples: 'You know the
work is always my weak point. When I think that might come to an end, I am all
undone.' He could easily withdraw from weakness and attachment, but the work still
retained its power to move him.
Sri Ramakrishna and the Divine Mother preoccupied his mind. He acted as if he were
the child of the Mother or the boy playing at the feet of Sri Ramakrishna at
Dakshineswar. He said, 'A great tapasya and meditation has come upon me, and I am
making ready for death.'
His disciples and spiritual brothers were worried to see his contemplative mood. They
remembered the words of Sri Ramakrishna that Naren, after his mission was
completed, would merge for ever into samadhi, and that he would refuse to live in his
physical body if he realized who he was. A brother monk asked him one day, quite
casually, 'Do you know yet who you are?' The unexpected reply, 'Yes, I now know!'
awed into silence everyone present. No further question was asked. All remembered
the story of the great nirvikalpa samadhi of Naren's youth, and how, when it was over,
Sri Ramakrishna had said: 'Now the Mother has shown you everything. But this
realization, like the jewel locked in a box, will be hidden away from you and kept in
my custody. I will keep the key with me. Only after you have fulfilled your mission on
this earth will the box be unlocked, and you will know everything as you have known
now.'

Continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2012, 09:57:38 PM »
The story of Swami Vivekananda's Last Days continued....
They also remembered that in the cave of Amarnath, in the summer of 1898, he had
received the grace of Siva — not to die till he himself should will to do so. He was
looking death in the face unafraid as it drew near.
Everything about the Swami in these days was deliberate and significant, yet none
could apprehend its true import. People were deceived by his outer cheerfulness. From
the beginning of June he appeared to be regaining his health.
One day, about a week before the end, he bade a disciple bring him the Bengali
almanac. He was seen several times on subsequent days studying the book intently, as
if he was undecided about something he wanted to know. After the passing away, the
brother monks and disciples realized that he had been debating about the day when he
should throw away the mortal body. Ramakrishna, too, had consulted the almanac
before his death.
Three days before the mahasamadhi, Vivekananda pointed out to Swami Premananda a
particular spot on the monastery grounds where he wished his body to be cremated.
On Wednesday the Swami fasted, following the orthodox rule: it was the eleventh day
of the moon. Sister Nivedita came to the monastery to ask him some questions about
her school; but he was not interested and referred her to some other Swamis. He
insisted, however, on serving Nivedita the morning meal. To quote the Sister's words:
Each dish, as it was offered — boiled seeds of the jack-fruit, boiled potatoes, plain rice,
and ice-cold milk — formed the subject of playful chat; and finally, to end the meal, he
himself poured the water over her hands, and dried them with a towel.
'It is I who should do these things for you, Swamiji! Not you for me!' was the protest
naturally offered. But his answer was startling in its solemnity — 'Jesus washed the
feet of his disciples!'
Something checked the answer, 'But that was the last time!' as it rose to the lips, and
the words remained unuttered. This was well. For here also, the time had come.
There was nothing sad or grave about the Swami during these days. Efforts were made
not to tire him. Conversations were kept as light as possible, touching only upon the
pet animals that surrounded him, his garden experiments, books, and absent friends.
But all the while one was conscious of a luminous presence of which the Swami's
bodily form seemed only a shadow or symbol. The members of the monastery had
never felt so strongly as now, before him, that they stood in the presence of an infinite
light; yet none was prepared to see the end so soon, least of all on that Friday, July the
Fourth, on which he appeared so much stronger and healthier than he had been for
years."

continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2012, 10:02:04 PM »
The Story of Swami Vivekananda's Last Days continued...
On the supreme day, Friday, he rose very early. Going to the chapel, alone, he shut the
windows and bolted the doors, contrary to his habit, and meditated for three hours.
Descending the stairs of the shrine, he sang a beautiful song about Kali:
Is Kali, my Mother, really black?
The Naked One, though black She seems,
Lights the Lotus of the heart.
Men call Her black, but yet my mind
Will not believe that She is so:
Now She is white, now red, now blue;
Now She appears as yellow, too.
I hardly know who Mother is,
Though I have pondered all my life:
Now Purusha, now Prakriti,
And now the Void, She seems to be.
To meditate on all these things
Confounds poor Kamalakanta's wits.
Then he said, almost in a whisper: 'If there were another Vivekananda, then he would
have understood what this Vivekananda has done! And yet — how many
Vivekanandas shall be born in time!'
He expressed the desire to worship Mother Kali at the Math the following day, and
asked two of his disciples to procure all the necessary articles for the ceremony. Next
he asked the disciple Suddhananda to read a passage from the Yajurveda with the
commentary of a well-known expositor. The Swami said that he did not agree with the
commentator and exhorted the disciple to give a new interpretation of the Vedic texts.
He partook of the noon meal with great relish, in company with the members of the
Math, though usually, at that time, he ate alone in his room because of his illness.
Immediately afterwards, full of life and humour, he gave lessons to the brahmacharins
for three hours on Sanskrit grammar. In the afternoon he took a walk for about two
miles with Swami Premananda and discussed his plan to start a Vedic College in the
monastery.
'What will be the good of studying the Vedas?' Premananda asked.
'It will kill superstition,' Swami Vivekananda said.
On his return the Swami inquired very tenderly concerning every member of the
monastery. Then he conversed for a long time with his companions on the rise and fall
of nations. 'India is immortal,' he said, 'if she persists in her search for God. But if she
goes in for politics and social conflict, she will die
.'

continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2012, 10:11:18 PM »
The Story of Swami Vivekananda's Last Days continued....
At seven o'clock in the evening the bell rang for worship in the chapel. The Swami
went to his room and told the disciple who attended him that none was to come to him
until called for. He spent an hour in meditation and telling his beads, then called the
disciple and asked him to open all the windows and fan his head. He lay down quietly
on his bed and the attendant thought that he was either sleeping or meditating.
At the end of an hour his hands trembled a little and he breathed once very deeply.
There was a silence for a minute or two, and again he breathed in the same manner. His
eyes became fixed in the centre of his eyebrows, his face assumed a divine expression,
and eternal silence fell.
'There was,' said a brother disciple of the Swami, 'a little blood in his nostrils, about his
mouth, and in his eyes.' According to the Yoga scriptures, the life-breath of an
illumined yogi passes out through the opening on the top of the head, causing the blood
to flow in the nostrils and the mouth.
The great ecstasy took place at ten minutes past nine. Swami Vivekananda passed
away at the age of thirty-nine years, five months, and twenty-four days, thus fulfilling
his own prophecy: 'I shall not live to be forty years old.'
The brother disciples thought that he might have fallen into samadhi, and chanted the
Master's name to bring back his consciousness. But he remained on his back
motionless.
Physicians were sent for and the body was thoroughly examined. In the doctor's
opinion life was only suspended; artificial respiration was tried. At midnight, however,
Swami Vivekananda was pronounced dead, the cause, according to medical science,
having been apoplexy or sudden failure of the heart.
In the morning people poured in from all quarters. Nivedita sat by the body and fanned
it till it was brought down at 2 p.m. to the porch leading to the courtyard. It was
covered with ochre robes and decorated with flowers. Incense was burnt and a
religious service was performed with lights, conch-shells, and bells. The brother monks
and disciples took their final leave and the procession started, moving slowly through
the courtyard and across the lawn, till it reached the vilva tree near the spot where the
Swami himself had desired his body to be cremated.
The funeral pyre was built and the body was consigned to the flames kindled with
sandalwood. Across the Ganga, on the other bank, Ramakrishna had been cremated
sixteen years before.
Nivedita began to weep like a child, rolling on the ground. Suddenly the wind blew
into her lap a piece of the ochre robe from the pyre, and she received it as a blessing. It
was dusk when the flames subsided. The sacred relics were gathered and the pyre was
washed with the water of the Ganga. The place is now marked by a temple, the table of
the altar standing on the very spot where the Swami's body rested in the flames.
Gloom and desolation fell upon the monastery. The monks prayed in the depths of their
hearts: 'O Lord! Thy will be done!' But deep beneath their grief all felt that this was not
the end. The words of the leader, uttered long before his death, rang in their ears:
'It may be that I shall find it good to get outside my body — to cast it off like a wornout
garment. But I shall not cease to work. I shall inspire men everywhere, until the
world shall know that it is one with God.'
And: 'May I be born again and again, and suffer thousands of miseries, so that I may
worship the only God that exists, the only God I believe in, the sum total of all souls.'
For centuries to come people everywhere will be inspired by Swami Vivekananda's
message: O man! first realize that you are one with Brahman — aham Brahmasmi —
and then realize that the whole universe is verily the same Brahman — sarvam
khalvidam Brahma.

Here is an excerpt from The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna,where the Master speaks about Narendra:
Pointing to Narendra, the Master said: "You all see this boy. He behaves that way here. A
naughty boy seems very gentle when with his father. But he is quite another person when
he plays in the chandni. Narendra and people of his type belong to the class of the everfree.
They are never entangled in the world. When they grow a little older they feel the
awakening of inner consciousness and go directly toward God. They come to the world
only to teach others. They never care for anything of the world. They are never attached to
'woman and gold'
.
"The Vedas speak of the homa bird. It lives high up in the sky and there it lays its egg. As
soon as the egg is laid it begins to fall; but it is so high up that it continues to fall for many
days. As it falls it hatches, and the chick falls. As the chick falls its eyes open; it grows
wings. As soon as its eyes open, it realizes that it is falling and will be dashed to pieces on
touching the earth. Then it at once shoots up toward the mother bird high in the sky."

Namaskar.

Nagaraj

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2012, 08:17:59 AM »
Dear i,

this doubt has never been new, there are so many saints who attained Jiva Samadhi, Jnaneshwar (he built his own Samadhi), Chandrashekhara Bharathi Swamiigal of Sringeri, (he went inside Tunga, to never come back, he was found in erect padmasana), Raghavendra (built his own samadhi), many more are there.

Infact, in Thirumanthiram, thirumoolar has mentioned the ways to leave prana.

We are just paranoid by the aspect of death. One has to die before one dies.

Salutations to Bhagavan
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2012, 09:23:41 AM »
From the Diary of a Disciple (Translated from Bengali)
[Place: Belur Math. Year: 1902.]


Today is the first of Âshârh (June-July). The disciple has come to the Math before duskfrom Bally, with his office-dress on, as he has not found time to change it. Coming to the Math, he prostrated himself at the feet of Swamiji and inquired about his health. Swamiji replied that he was well, but looking at his dress, he said, "You put on coat and trousers, why don't you put on collars?" Saying this, he called Swami Saradananda who was near and said, "Give him tomorrow two collars from my stock." Swami Saradananda bowed assent to his order. The disciple then changed his office-dress and came to Swamiji, who, addressing him, said, "By giving up one's national costume and ways of eating and living, one gets denationalised. One can learn from all, but that learning which leads to denationalisation does not help one's uplift but becomes the cause of degradation."
Disciple: Sir, one cannot do without putting on dress approved by superior European officers in official quarters.
Swamiji: No one prevents that. In the interests of your service, you put on official dress in official quarters. But on returning home you should be a regular Bengali Babu — with flowing cloth, a native shirt, and with the Chudder on the shoulder. Do you understand?
Disciple: Yes, sir.
Swamiji: You go about from house to house only with the European shirt on. In the West, to go about visiting people with simply the shirt on is ungentlemanly — one is considered naked. Without putting on a coat over the shirt, you will not be welcomed in a gentleman's house. What nonsense have you learnt to imitate in the matter of dress! Boys and young men nowadays adopt a peculiar manner of dress which is neither Indian nor Western, but a queer combination.
After such talk Swamiji began to pace the bank of the river, and the disciple was alone with him. He was hesitating to ask Swamiji a question about religious practices.
Swamiji: What are you thinking? Out with it.
The disciple with great delicacy said, "Sir, I have been thinking that if you can teach me some method by which the mind becomes calm within a short time, by which I may be immersed in meditation quickly, I shall feel much benefited. In the round of worldly duties, I feel it difficult to make the mind steady in meditation at the time of spiritual
practice."
Swamiji seemed delighted at this humility and earnestness of the disciple. In reply he affectionately said, "After some time come to me when I am alone upstairs, I will talk to you about it."
Coming up shortly after, the disciple found that Swamiji was sitting in meditation, facing the west. His face wore a wonderful expression, and his whole body was completely motionless. The disciple stood by, looking with speechless wonder on the figure of Swamiji in meditation, and when even after standing long he found no sign of external consciousness in Swamiji, he sat noiselessly by. After half an hour, Swamiji seemed to show signs of a return to external consciousness. The disciple found that his folded hands began to quiver, and a few minutes later Swamiji opened his eyes and looking at the disciple said, "When did you come?"
Disciple: A short while ago.
Swamiji: Very well, get me a glass of water.
The disciple hurriedly brought a glass of water and Swamiji drinking a little, asked the disciple to put the glass back in its proper place. The disciple did so and again sat by
Swamiji.

continued...

Ravi.N

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2012, 09:33:51 AM »
The Diary of a Disciple continued...
Swamiji: Today I had a very deep meditation.
Disciple: Sir, please teach me so that my mind also may get absorbed in meditation.
Swamiji: I have already told you all the methods. Meditate every day accordingly, and in the fulness of time you will feel like that. Now tell me what form of Sadhana appeals to you most.
Disciple: Sir, I practise every day as you have told me, still I don't get a deep meditation. Sometimes I think it is useless for me to practise meditation. So I feel that I shall not fare well in it, and therefore now desire only eternal companionship with you.
Swamiji: Those are weaknesses of the mind. Always try to get absorbed in the eternally present Atman. If you once get the vision of the Atman, you will get everything — the bonds of birth and death will be broken.
Disciple: You bless me to attain to it. You asked me, still I don't get a deep meditation. By some means, do please make my mind steady.
Swamiji: Meditate whenever you get time. If the mind once enters the path of Sushumna, everything will get right. You will not have to do much after that.
Disciple: You encourage me in many ways. But shall I be blessed with a vision of the Truth? Shall I get freedom by attaining true knowledge?
Swamiji: Yes, of course. Everybody will attain Mukti, from a worm up to Brahmâ, and shall you alone fail? These are weaknesses of the mind; never think of such things.
After this, he said again: "Be possessed of Shraddhâ (faith), of Virya (courage), attain to the knowledge of the Atman, and sacrifice your life for the good of others — this is my wish and blessing."
The bell for the meal ringing at this moment, Swamiji asked the disciple to go and partake of it. The disciple, prostrating himself at the feet of Swamiji, prayed for his
blessings. Swamiji putting his hand on his head blessed him and said, "If my blessings be of any good to you, I say — may Bhagavân Shri Ramakrishna give you his grace! I know of no blessing higher than this." After meals, the disciple did not go upstairs to Swamiji, who had retired early that night. Next morning the disciple, having to return to Calcutta in the interests of his business appeared before Swamiji upstairs.
Swamiji: Will you go immediately?
Disciple: Yes, sir.
Swamiji: Come again next Sunday, won't you?
Disciple: Yes, certainly.
Swamiji: All right, there is a boat coming.
The disciple took leave of Swamiji. He did not know that this was to be his last meeting with his Ishtadeva (chosen Ideal) in the physical body. Swamiji with a glad heart bade him farewell and said, "Come on Sunday." The disciple replied, "Yes, I will," and got downstairs.
The boatmen were calling for him, so he ran for the boat. Boarding it, he saw Swamiji pacing the upper verandah, and saluting him he entered the boat.
Seven days after this, Swamiji passed away from mortal life. The disciple had no knowledge of the impending catastrophe. Getting the news on the second day of
Swamiji's passing away, he came to the Math, and therefore he had not the good fortune to see his physical form again!

Diary of a Disciple-Sarat Chandra chakravarthy

Subramanian.R

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2012, 12:04:55 PM »
Dear Ravi,

I had read sometime long back, that after Swami Vivekananda merged with his guru or god,  inmates found in his mortal coil
blood stain in the nostrils. What does it signify? Is it something to do with yogic method of leaving the mortal coil?  Swami
Vivekananda, as far as I know was having only diabetes and no other ailments.

Arunachala Siva.     

ramana_maharshi

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2012, 02:53:30 PM »
I think swami vivekanada used to smoke

In One letter there is a question..

Was he a heavy smoker?'
'No. He would smoke after breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but never to excess"

http://www.vivekananda.net/ReminiscenesOnSwami/AliceHansbrough.html
http://www.vivekananda.net/LettersToVivekananda.html

Nagaraj

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2012, 06:38:30 PM »
Dear i,

:)

i saw some people discussing among themselves, about Srimad Ramayana, and they were interested in knowing whether Lord Rama ate meat or not, as he was Kshatriya.

:)

Salutations to Bhagavan
॥ शांतमात्मनि तिष्ट ॥
Remain quietly in the Self.
~ Vasishta

Subramanian.R

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Re: clarify on Swami Vivekananda's last days
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2012, 06:53:36 PM »
Dear Nagaraj,

An ativarnasrami or an avatara can do anything and it will not affect his Realization. So whether Swami Vivekananda smoked
or not is immaterial for his realization. Regarding Rama, yes, he was eating meat. But Valmiki Ramayanam says that in the forest
where he was living like a rishi and Sita as a rishi patni, both had left meat eating.

There is one story about Rangan and Sri Bhagavan. Rangan pleased with Sri Bhagavan's swimming with him in the tank, and even
kicking Rangan on his back with His legs, asked Sri Bhagavan: Swami, Can a sannyasi  do all these things?  Sri Bhagavan said:
When he is ati varnasrami he can do anything. Rangan curiously asked: Can he marry too?  Sri Bhagavan said: Hm...Hm......
Rangan could not believe his years. Jnananubhavam is not a hindrance to any worldly activities. Janaka ruled a kingdom. Sri
Sankara moved all over Hindustan to establish Maths. But Sri Bhagavan did not move out of Tiruvannamalai. It all happens as
per the Will of God.

Once a devotee asked: After self realization why should Sankara move from place to place instead of sitting in one place?

Sri Bhagavan said: Why not?
Did not Narada move from place to place? Did not Jnana Sambandha move from place to place? Did not Janaka rule a kingdom?
Did not Tondaripodi Azhwar and Kaduveli Siddhar get married?

In Tamizh there is a proverb: Siddhan pokku Sivan pokku.

Arunachala Siva.