Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 200043 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #645 on: November 27, 2014, 12:26:52 PM »
Once the private secretary to the Governor of Pondicherry arrived at the Asramam, with a few of his associates.  He came into the
Hall with a large sheet of paper filled with a long list of questions written in an elaborate, complex style of French.  He handed
the paper to Sri Bhagavan, walked over to the window opposite Bhagavan's couch and sat on the window sill. Bhagavan looked
at the questions and, noticing they were in French, asked me to translate them. I found the French difficult.  I was struggling with
it, word by word, while translating to Bhagavan.

Bhagavan, realizing my difficulty said,  'That is not necessary. Just tell me the gist of it.'  I scanned the list and told Bhagavan that
he really did not want oral answers but would rather want to have an  experience.

Bhagavan paused for a moment.  He then slowly turned His face in the direction of the questioner and rested His ppwerful
eyes on him.  After about thirty seconds, I noticed the man's body began to tremble!  Soon he was shaking all over! 
Then he blurted out, 'Oh, no, Bhagavan!, not now! Please Bhagavan, not now!!!

I was standing a little to the side of Bhagavan, watching this extraordinary scene and wondering what a being this
Bhagavan was.  He was a store house of power but yet so kind, gentle and compassionate. In spite of all this grandeur
He always seemed  so human and natural, even laughing and joking with us on occasion.

The Self Experience is like the act of an elephant entering into a small hut!  Many cannot bear with it, without their body
and mind ransacked.

N. Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.

             
Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #646 on: November 27, 2014, 01:40:39 PM »
On another occasion, I asked Bhagavan about suicide.  I had been cycling around the Hill and on meeting a bus the thought
had come to into my head: 'Why should I not concentrate on the Self  and throw myself in front of the bus, so that in this
way I may attain Moksha!'  I told this to Bhagavan, but He said that it would not work.  Thoughts would spring up involuntarily
as I fell, fear and the shock would cause them, and thoughts coming, life would continue, so that I would have to take another body!
If I  could still my mind sufficiently so that such a thing would not happen, then what was the need of suicide?

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #647 on: November 28, 2014, 12:23:04 PM »
It was during the war, many people were talking about aeroplanes, bombs, and other wonderful things that were being
made for the sake of destruction.  Bhagavan remarked that there was nothing wonderful in all that, they had had all these
things before in ancient India.  Rama had His flower car, which was nothing but an aeroplane, and in accounts of the ancient
wars we find mentioned, fire weapons, diamond weapons and even electric weapons besides many others which are described
in ancients books.  Modern man thinks he is so wonderful but the ancients knew many more things than he imagines.  They
had a combination of metals by which they were able to overcome gravity.  People have not succeeded in doing that.

A question was once asked if human beings were ever reborn as animals.  'Oh, yes,' said Bhagavan.  'even today they will take
on such forms just be born here.'  An instance of this is certainly the cow Lakshmi.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #648 on: November 28, 2014, 12:28:28 PM »
Nowadays we see many spiritual teachers opening schools, hospitals, and the like. All this philanthropy has a purpose,
no doubt, but Bhagavan never asked us to do such things.  He wanted us to do one thing only, that is to know who we
are, to know the Self.  He believed this to be the panacea for all human sufferings and the goal of life.  But how many
of us are sufficiently earnest to seek the Self alone?  We are continually diverted and distracted by what we call 'helping
the world'.  Where is the world?  And who are we?  This is what we should be looking into.

N. Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #649 on: November 29, 2014, 01:26:24 PM »
On another day, not too long after settling near Sri Ramanasramam, I approached Bhagavan, when no one was near in the
Hall, and showed Him the last letter I had received from Sri Aurobindo.  He asked me to read it out.  I began reading it
and when I came to the sentence, 'Since you are determined to follow a path in which you can achieve only partial realization...'
Bhagavan stopped me and said, 'Partial Realization?  If it is partial, it is not Realization, and if it is Realization, it is not partial.'

This was the final blow that silenced all my doubts.  Because of all the discussions I had had with Bhagavan, I soon felt
perfectly established in His teachings, having a clear understanding of where the Maharshi's path and Sri Aurobindo's
path diverged and went different ways. When all clouds of doubt and distraction dispersed, so too did our discussions.
Bhagavan knew that I understood and that the foundation had been laid., The purpose of all our discussions was served
and so they stopped automatically.

N.Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #650 on: November 29, 2014, 01:34:54 PM »
One night a dog stood on a rock at the back of the Asramam and barked without stopping. At last Bhagavan told someone
to take it some food.  This was done, the dog ate it, and quickly went away.  It was not seen again.  Bhagavan explained
that it was some Siddha who had taken that form to come here and have a meal as he was hungry.  There are many such
about He said, but they did not wish to make themselves known and so came like this.

He was asked if the story were true that there were always seven Jnanis living about the Hill. 'There can be even more than that,'
He told us, 'Who can tell? How to recognize them? They may appear as beggars lying in a ditch or in some other unrecognizable
capacity.  It is impossible to say.'

Sadhu Arunachala's (Major Chadwick's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #651 on: November 30, 2014, 01:17:14 PM »
Bhagavan always discouraged any devotee going Mounam, or taking a vow of silence.  During the war I decided that I would
like to do so, chiefly to protect myself, from the jibes of others.  I went and asked Bhagavan's permission. He was not enthusiastic
and told me that it was useless to keep the tongue still but to continue to write messages on bits of paper which so many called
Mounis continue to do. In this way only the tongue had a rest but the mind continued just as before.  I said that I had no
intention of doing this but would throw my pencil and paper away.  I felt that  I had obtained a reluctant consent as Bhagavan
agreed that people were worrying me. So I made the necessary arrangements, installed a bell from my room to the kitchen so
I should not have to call my servant, and fixed a lucky day to being. The night before I was to start, a friend of mine brought
up the subject in the Hall after the evening meal when only a few of us were present. Bhagavan immediately showed His
disapproval and said it was necessary and in fact not a good thing at all.  I did not talk much anyhow.  It was better to speak only
when it was necessary, that it actually did no good to observe silence, that if one did so for twelve years one became dumb and
might obtain some thaumaturgic powers, but who wanted them?  Speech acted as a safety valve.  Naturally after this talk I
gave up the idea.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #652 on: November 30, 2014, 01:25:29 PM »
When I had observed Bhagavan closely for sometime, I discovered that He would never openly say that He was our Guru and we
were His disciples.  In fact, He would sometimes say things that sounded contrary to this.  But for us close devotees there was
never a doubt that He was our Guru. He loved us like a mother, protected us like a fat her, guided us like a teacher and moved
with us like a friend.  We constantly felt His guidance and grace.

Where do we read in the annals of the spiritual history of India about a Sage like Bhagavan, living  in one place for fifty four
years, making Himself available all times and embodying such divine qualities?  We would sit in the Hall and meditate with
our eyes closed, or just rest our vision on His form, which we believed to be the form of God. He would teach us orally,
or in silence, or again by deed.  Sometimes in subtle ways, and at other times directly.

N. Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #653 on: December 01, 2014, 01:46:59 PM »
He was also against people taking Sannyasa. If properly kept, it was a useless tie. If not properly kept, it condemned itself.
After all, it only made one think 'now I am a Sannyasin' instead of 'now I am in the world'.  Thought went on and that was
the chief enemy.  About retiring to the forest and shutting oneself up in a cave, he expressed exactly the same views.  So
he obviously endorsed living in the world as itself the necessary environment for helping a person along in his sadhana.
If one could do this, be in the world, but not of the world, one had achieved a high state of detachment. It is always better
to have some sort of opposition , the tree is not buffeted by the winds is usually a weakling. 

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #654 on: December 01, 2014, 03:12:09 PM »
Sri Bhagavan's Humor:


Sri Bhagavan would daily visit Mother's Samadhi (the Temple waa not built then), either in the morning or in the evening. One
day Chinnaswami said to me, 'Please come down in the morning itself. I will prepare some dosas tomorrow and you can take
them to Sri Bhagavan and others. ' I agreed. I asked Ramakrishna Swami to look after Sri Bhagavan and came down to
Mother's Samadhi.  Early in the morning, when I was washing the dishes in the stream, near Palakottu, I suddenly heard a voice:
'Any food for a guest?' Startled, I looked up and was thrilled to see Sri Bhagavan standing with a towel wrapped around His head
and a stick in His hand.  It was a rare darshan.  In the meantime, Chinnaswami and Dandapani Swami came and were overjoyed
to see Bhagavan there.  They requested Him to eat dosa, but He refused at first. At their repeated requests,. He agreed. He brushed
His teeth with a neem twig and washed His face in the stream.  We had with us the usual goat's milk also.  Sri Bhagavan ate dosa
and drank coffee.  Looking at me, He said, 'Everyone comes over here because of nice food they get here.' and laughed heartily.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #655 on: December 02, 2014, 01:16:19 PM »
One day someone remarked to Bhagavan, 'There are many things that happen here of which Bhagavan cannot approve. Why does
He remain here? He has no ties or desires.'

'What can I do?' asked Bhagavan. 'If I go off to the forest and try to hide, what will happen?  They will soon find me out.
Then someone will put up a hut in front of me and another person at the back, and it will not be long before huts will
sprung up on either side. Where can I go?  I shall always be a prisoner.'

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala 'Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #656 on: December 02, 2014, 01:26:49 PM »
Parayana and Sri Bhagavan's deep meditation:

At Skandasramam, we would sit before Sri Bhagavan every evening at 6.30 and recite 'Aksharamanamalai'. Sri
Bhagavan used to close His eyes reclining on the pillow. We would finish the recitation exactly at 7.30, when we
generally had our supper.  Once in two or three days, during the Parayana, Sri Bhagavan would go into deep meditation.
Even at the end of the Parayana, He would not open His eyes.  We used to call Him gently, but Sri Bhagavan would
be completely oblivious of His surroundings.  To wake Him up, Perumal Swami, Akandananda, Mastan Swami and I
would take out some conches at the Asramam and blow them.  The sound of the conch used to penetrate into Him
and bring Him back to the external world slowly.  On such days, we would eat only at 9.00 p.m. This happened frequently.
Even after moving to His Mother's Samadhi at the foot of the Hill, this used to happen once a week or ten days. 
Dandapani Swami used to massage Sri Bhagavan's feet to wake Him up, but in vain.  He used to become aware of the
external world only through our blowing of the conches.  It is said in Vasishtam, that Sri Krishna had to blow the conch
to wake Prahlada from his tapas.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #657 on: December 02, 2014, 02:16:37 PM »
The Power of His Presence:

I believe the unique characteristic of Bhagavan was the power of His Presence.  Much of what He taught had already been
transmitted to the masses down the ages.  In Bhagavan, we found a being that was surcharge with the Reality, to such
an extent that coming into His Presence would effect a dramatic change in us. The Divine Power of His Presence was something
remarkable, entirely outstanding.

I always felt there was something perceptibly distinct in Bhagavan's Hall.  When we walked into it, and sat down, we
immediately felt like we had just entered a different plane of existence. It was as if the world we knew did not exist there
- Bhagavan's Presence, His other-worldliness, would so envelop the atmosphere.  When we walked out of the Hall, we were
again confronted with the old world, we knew all too well.

N. Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #658 on: December 03, 2014, 02:58:43 PM »
In this respect the following story is an amusing illustration.  One day, years ago, Bhagavan decided to have a day's
fast. He intended to wander about the Hill of which He knew every inch, having explored it as a young man. So He took
a rather larger meal than the usual the previous night to keep himself going. He set off alone in the early morning,
but He had not gone far away when seven women met Him. 'Oh, here is our Swami,' they cried out delightedly.
They made Him sit down and proceeded to serve him a full meal which they seemed to have brought on purpose. When He
had finished they departed saying, 'We will come and bring Swami His mid day meal.', and in some extraordinary way they
did find Him again though He had followed no beaten track.  They again served Him a large meal.

Bhagavan made His way home feeling He had eaten  far more than was good for Him. M.V,Ramaswamy Iyer,a very old
disciple living in the town, had heard that Bhagavan was going o have a day's fast, and decided that by evening He
would be hungry, so He cooked a sumptuous meal and went out to meet Bhagavan whom He encountered on the outskirts
of the town. Here he made Him sit down and again eat and would not spare Him. So Bhagavan returned home gorged
saying He would never spend a day fasting again. With regard to the seven women who had met Him so mysteriously
Bhagavan suggested that they must be fairies.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's ) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #659 on: December 03, 2014, 03:17:29 PM »
Mouna:

One night, not too long after moving in with S.S. Cohen, at Palakottu, sometime after 9 p.m. I had an urge to go on
pradakshina around Arunachala.  I was then staying on the verandah of his cottage, which enabled me to come and go
without disturbing him.  He probably did not know that I went out that night.

I was slowly walking around the Hill when I came near the Kanchi Road. This is just half way around the Hill and near what
is now called 'Sri Bhagavan's Bridge', so named because Bhagavan would often stop there and rest.  I was looking at the
Holy Mountain, surcharged with peace and silence, when a strong urge arose within me to take a vow of Mouna. I resolved
on the spot to stop speaking to anyone, except the occasional exchanges I may have with Bhagavan.

In the morning, when Cohen began talking to me in his usual way, he soon noticed that I was not  responding. I wrote
on a piece of paper my decision to observe Mouna, which took him by surprise.

Soon, Viswanathan received a letter from Swami Ramdas: "Balaram Reddy is observing Mouna? That is very good. He is a
pure soul. '  Bhagavan repeated this quotation to me in English.

Bhagavan's mention provided me with the assurance e that my decision to observe Mouna was correct. It was sometimes
difficult to tell if Bhagavan approved of a certain act or not, as He interfered very little in our outward lives.  But if we kept alert,
He would somehow let us know in one way or other -- often in a subtle manner -- whether what we were doing was correct or
incorrect.

Once Major Chadwick decided that he too would observe Mouna, but Bhagavan made it clear to him that it was not necessay
or advantageous in his case.

I observed silence from June 1938 to September 1939 when something that Bhagavan said induced me to end it. 

N. Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.