Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 199624 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #630 on: November 17, 2014, 02:47:07 PM »
One morning, Varanasi Subbyulakshmi Ammal came to Bhagavan while He was sitting for breakfast. She went up to Bhagavan
with a glass of hot water. Giving Him the glass, she stood before Him and asked, 'Bhagavan, it is said that Namadeva used
to talk freely with Lord Panduranga and that Lord would sit next to him and eat with him, just as a friend. Is it really possible
for anybody to be on such intimate terms with God? Is it true that God was actually there, in human form?'

Bhagavan looked at her and said, 'Yes. That is what is written in the book, whatever the book says is as true as the fact that
you and I are now here, and conversing with each other. If this is real, then the statements in the book are real too. If this
is unreal, then the claims made in the book are also unreal. Everything depends upon the imagination! Once the devotee
becomes absorbed in the Self, he stops thinking of God as separate from himself. But until he reaches such a state, one must'
keep his faith alive. God has to grant the devotee's every prayer, to coax him to stay on the path of Self Realization. Once
Realization is attained, the devotee loses his sense of individuality and merges with the Supreme Being., Now he know s that
everything is but a manifestation of the Self.'

All her doubts disappeared when she heard Bhagavan's clear and precise explanation. So she felt that her mind had gained
a greater clarity.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #631 on: November 18, 2014, 03:28:57 PM »
...On the last night, Bhagavan was lying in the small room which had originally been built as a store room when He had
moved into the big Hall.......

.... There were some American reporters and photographers, who were there just for a scoop. They were living less than
half a mile away.  One of them standing outside the house suddenly looked up and saw a very bright star or meteor swing
slowly across the sky towards North over the top of the Hill. He called out the rest of the party who ran out and saw the
same phenomenon. One and all agreed that something had happened to Bhagavan. Even though they were without special
faith in Him, by some intuition, they were certain that this must be the case. It happened at the time of the passing, 8/47 PM.
on April 14th, 1950. and was seen by many people, all of whom strangely enough,associated it with the same thing.  People
in Madras, too saw it and some got into their cars immediately and made their way to the Asramam.  This is a fact which I
will not attempt to explain, but must accept as it happened.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's ) Reminiscences.   


Arunachala Siva.
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #632 on: November 19, 2014, 12:42:43 PM »
In 1938, Stanley Jones, a Congregational Bishop came to call one morning. He was accompanied by a secretary who took
copious notes of all he said, and little of what the Maharshi was allowed to say, which was not much.    There were two
other Christians in the party.  He was on a tour of India collecting material for a book which was out to prove that Hindu
Saints were nothing as compared with just an ordinary Christian believer. He wanted to know what Bhagavan's method
had been and how much and what He had attained by it.  His whole attitude was arrogant and uncompromising.  For the actual
conversation I have refreshed my memory from Talks though modified according to my memory.

S.J. What is the quest and goal?  How far you have progressed?

Bhagavan: The goal is the same for all. But why search for a goal at all? Why are you not content as you are?

S.J. Is there then no goal?

Bhagavan: I am asking you why are you are seeking a goal?

S.J. I have my own views on these things.  I want to know what Maharshi has to say about them.

Bhagavan: Maharshi has no doubts so does not need to ask such questions. What are you searching for?

S.J. I consider the goal  to be realization of the Higher Mind by the lower mind, so that the Kingdom of Heaven may come to earth.
The lower mind is now incomplete.  Only this way it can be perfected.

Bhagavan: So you do admit a lower mind which is incomplete and seeks perfection in a Higher Mind. Tell me, in what way
is that lower mind different from the Higher Mind?

S.J. (Ignoring the question but declaiming his own views in which alone he was interested). The Kingdom of Heaven was
brought down to earth by Jesus Christ. I consider him the Kingdom personified. I want everybody to realize this. Christ said,
'I am hungry with other man's hunger.'  Mutual partnership is joy and to be apart from the Kingdom of Heaven is pain. If that
Kingdom is universalized each of us will become at one with rest.

Bhagavan: You talk about a difference between people but what becomes of this difference in deep sleep?

S.J. (Again ignoring the question) I want to be wide awake.

Bhagavan: You believe that you are awake now. On the contrary this is only a dream in a long sleep.  Everybody is asleep,
this world and all actions are only a dream.

S.J. This is Vedanta. I have no use for it.  These differences are not imaginary.  They are positive. (Harping back to his old
question), Can Maharshi tell us what He has found?  What is this waking state of which He talks?

Bhagavan: It is beyond the three states of waking, dream and deep sleep.

S.J. But I am awake now and I know it.

Bhagavan: But the real waking state, there are no differences. 

S.J. What happens to this world in that case?

Bhagavan: There is no world in your deep sleep. When you wake does the world suddenly appear and tell you, I exist?

S.J. No. But other people tell me that there is a world and that it needs spiritual and moral regeneration.
So there must actually be a world.  All are agreed to as to that.

Bhagavan: You now see the world and the people in it, but can they exist apart from your thoughts? 

S.J. (Going off at a tangent) I enter the world with Love.

Bhagavan: Are you apart from it that you can enter it?

S.J. I am identified with it. I came here to ask questions and to listen Maharshi's answers. Why do you keep on
asking me questions in this way?

Bhagavan: But Maharshi has answered your questions. The real waking state does not involve differences.

S. J. Have you reached the goal?

Bhagavan: There is no goal apart from the Self, so how can it be something to be gained afresh?  If so it would be
impermanent and what is impermanent will one day disappear. Do you not agree that the goal must be eternal?
So it must be within the Self. Seek and find it there.

S.J. I want to know your experience.

Bhagavan: Whatever experience I have does not affect the question.  Each must find the truth for himself. How can
someone else find it for you.

S.J. Not at all. Each person's experience has a human value and can be shared by others.

Bhagavan: The questioner must solve his question, another cannot do it for him.

S.J. (Smugly) But I know the answer.

Bhagavan: Tell us!

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

contd.,

Arunachala Siva.       

   
                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #633 on: November 19, 2014, 12:53:46 PM »
To my query about the Golden Jubilee, the Asramam replied the next day as follows:

'There is no particular programme for the Golden Jubilee celebration.  Of course all devotees are expected to attend the function,
and there will be publication of the Souvenir volume which contains articles by devotees who have had as yet no opportunity
to write of Sri Bhagavan and His teachings.  Owing to paper scarcity, we had to limit the pages.'

As desired by Nagamma I copied from my notebook Sri Bhagavan's Telugu rendering of His definition of Mounam in my
letter to her. Acknowledging it, she wrote on September 30,
'As I mentioned the matter to Sri Bhagavan, He took your letter from me for verification and read it out from beginning
to end. Then brother T.P. Ramachandra Iyer was present. Sri Bhagavan told him jocularly that his name was not included
among those to whom the letter conveyed compliments. You copy talies with the Telugu definition of Mounam in Ramachandra
Iyer's not written by Bhagavan Himself. It adds:

Mounam is the state of Sakti emerges from within as One Word.'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #634 on: November 20, 2014, 01:42:18 PM »
Stanley Jones story continues....

S.J. Twenty years ago, I was shown the Kingdom of Heaven. It was by God's Grace alone. I made no effort to attain it.
I was happy. Now my purpose is to make it available for all.  Nevertheless I want to know Maharshi's experience of the divine.

Bhagavan kept quiet. Stanley Jones then gave a discourse on Love.  How he had two Ashrams in North India and how through
these he was spreading Love through the world. He was in the best sermon form and the secretary was busy recording his words.
After  a while, he again renewed his offensive and tried to get Bhagavan to tell him of his experiences.

Mrs. Jinarajadasa, wife of the President of the Theosophical Society who happened to be in the Hall at the time protested.

'Here we believe that Maharshi Himself has brought the Kingdom of Heaven to earth, now you pester him with questions
relating to His experience. Is it not rather up to you to follow His instructions and seek it within yourself?

S.J. But how shall I realize it?

But he would not stop.  He kept on nagging at Bhagavan refusing to understand what he was telling him, until eventually,
I became impatient.

I was sitting at  the far end of the Hall meditating or at least trying to, but his absurd persistence distracted me. Eventually,
I could stand it no longer and called out.

'Why do you ask Maharshi to realize it for you?  The Kingdom of Heaven is within you.  Your own scriptures tell you that.'

He turned round in surprise to see who was this impertinent person who dared to intervene and question a  pillar of
Congregationalism 

'I don't' he snorted angrily.

'Yes. you do. Why don't you follow your own Christian teaching and find the Kingdom of Heaven within?'

S.J. It does not say that. It says 'come among you.

I: No. That is not correct, 'within you'.  Also it adds, 'Seek ye first the Kingdom of Heaven and then all things will be added
unto you.' Why don't you do that?

Stanley Jones deciding that he was not receiving the reception that was his due as an important person, said, 'We have
overstayed our time.'

The secretary bundled up her precious papers and the party got up and left the Hall.

Bhagavan laughed after they had gone and remarked  that I had certainly paid him back in his own coin.

Some time  after that, an article appeared in a Punjabi paper, on his visit to the Maharshi. In which he said that Bhagavan'ss
teaching was the usual negative, 'make the mind a blank', a thing never taught by Bhagavan and never even mentioned in the
above interview.  So we see how useless it is for a person who is not fit to receive instruction from a Guru to sit at His feet?
Stanley Jones came to the Asramam with preconceived ideas, so could accept nothing else. He went away convinced that
he had heard what he had already decided to hear!

concluded.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #635 on: November 20, 2014, 02:33:24 PM »
About this time (1946) Sri Oruganti Narasimha, Yogi of East Godavari, who had practiced Yoga under a Guru in the Himalayas,
expressed a desire to visit the Asramam for Sri Bhagavan's darshan.  A  Yogic friend of his, it seems, visualized and measured
the halo of several great personages like Sri Swami Vivekananda and Sri Aurobindo. But he could not take measure of of Sri
Bhagavan's as His halo had extended beyond the Yogi's ken.  When I wrote to Nagamma conveying the above information, she
replied as follows:

'It is a very good thing that Narasimha Yogi intends to come here.  Sri Bhagavan read your letter fully in the Hall, and observed,
'I have already heard of Narasimha Yogi. Let his friend who claims to have determined the dimensions of halo ass so much, first
see and measure his own halo of his Self.'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #636 on: November 21, 2014, 01:42:28 PM »
Bhagavan Ramana's reactions to mad people, were negative and at times almost disapproving. Where we expected pity
we found no such thing.  It seemed, by the way Bhagavan spoke of them, that He considered that it was their own fault,
that it was, in fact, just lack of control , that if they really wanted to they could pull themselves together and act normally.
Bhagavan never said any of this, it is only my personal feeling on the subject.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
 
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #637 on: November 21, 2014, 01:51:53 PM »
I was told -

The Golden Jubilee celebrations are a grand success.  In spite of transport difficulties, several devotees from far and near
managed to get here for the function. The proceedings started with the usual Veda Parayanam which commenced at 4 a.m.
on that day.  The whole of that day, Sri Bhagavan was seated in t he spacious Kottam put up, for the occasion and the whole
of the forenoon was spent in the reading of verses and songs composed for the occasion by the devotees.  They were in
several languages.

In the afternoon, proceedings started exactly at 2.30 pm Swastivachakam  with Poornakumbham by Brahmins reciting Riks
and Salutation Slokas to Sri Bhagavan started the evening function. Justice Kuppuswami Iyer presided. There were speeches
in English, Telugu, Tamizh and Malayalam in praise of Sri Bhagavan and His teachings. Music by Sri Musiri Subramania
Iyer and party, which was excellent and Veda Parayanam closed the proceedings of the day. Everything went on according to
programme  excellently.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #638 on: November 22, 2014, 12:50:55 PM »
There was one lady who spent sometime at the Asramam and thought herself a very great devotee, who entirely shut herself
in a cottage just outside the gate, tying a cloth across her eyes so that  she should not see and so be distracted by the wicked
world, at the same time observing silence, hoping in this way, to quiet the senses.  All that Bhagavan said  was, 'Why does she
not come over here and join us like other people? What good is all this going to do?  She comes here to be with us and then
shuts herself away.'

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #639 on: November 22, 2014, 01:24:54 PM »
In the evening Prof. D.S. Sarma (1946) put a question and Sri Bhagavan replied at length.  The full text of the question and
the reply which was later presented to me by the Professor himself is given hereunder:

Q: In the lives of the Western mystics we find descriptions of what is called the mystic way with the three well marked stages
of purgation, illumination, and union.  The purgatory stage corresponds to what we call Sadhana period.  Was there any such
period in the life of Sri Bhagavan.

Bhagavan: I know no such period. I never performed any Pranayama or Japa.  I know no mantras. I had no rules of meditation
or contemplation. Even when I came to hear of such things later, I was never attracted by them. Even now, my mind refuses
to pay attention to them.  Sadhana implies an object to be gained which we do not already possess?  In meditation, concentration,
and contemplation, what we have to do is only, not to think of anything but to be still.  Then we shall be in our natural state.
This natural state. This natural state is given many names -- Moksha, Jnana, Atma etc., -- and these give rise to many
controversies.  There was a time when I used to remain with my eyes closed. That does not mean that I was practicing any
sadhana then.  Even now I sometimes remain with my eyes closed.  If people choose to say that I am doing some sadhana
at the moment, let them say so.  It makes no difference to me.  People seem to think that by practicing some elaborate sadhana
the Self would one day descend upon them as something very big and with tremendous glory and they would then have
what is called Sakshatkaram.  The Self is Sakshat all right, but there is no karam or kartam about it.  The word karam implies
one's doing something. But the Self is realized not by one's doing something, but by one's refraining from doing anything
by remaining still and being simply what one is really is.             

Referring to this talk Prof. Sarma later wrote to me on October 7:

'Don't you think it contains statement which should go into any permanent record about this great Mystic of South
India?'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #640 on: November 24, 2014, 01:30:15 PM »
Another woman, a Jewess, who had undergone dreadful Nazi persecution in Germany used to strip off all her clothes
and appear naked in public, having hysterical fits, scream, and seem beyond all control. Bhagavan was very cold about
her antics and hardly seemed interested. Though He did make some inquiry, when the police took her away, and ask what had
become  of her, He showed no apparent sympathy with her ravings.

Sadhu Arunachala's (Major Chadwicks ) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #641 on: November 24, 2014, 02:37:44 PM »
After return home I had two dreams in one night of Sri Bhagavan.  In the first dream I saw Sri Bhagavan walking on a slippery
ground. Fearing that He might stumble, I approached Him with a view to guard His person.  But Sri Bhagavan instead held
firmly by the hand and led me safely across the ground.  In the second dream, Sri Bhagavan  presented me with a far off soap
and said that it would cleanse the inner being as well as the outer body.   In reply to my letter, relating the above dreams, the
Asramam wrote on October 20:

'Sri Maheswara, who for us is appearing in the  form of Sri Ramana , is ever guiding us, warding off the evil.  Let our trust and
faith in Him increase more and more. You dreams are to serve this purpose alone.'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     
   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #642 on: November 25, 2014, 01:28:13 PM »
Many people consider it most auspicious to handle anything that their Guru has touched intimately.  Old ladies would
wait outside the bathroom to sip water running from Bhagavan's bath, or the water on the ground left after He had
washed His feet on returning from a stroll.  So it was considered especially to eat from a leaf that Bhagavan had already
used for His meal. But Bhagavan Himself was dead against such things and did His best o discourage them. It was the
habit in the Asramam for each person to remove his own leaf after he had eaten, with, of course, the exception of Bhagavan.
But one of the attendants was responsible to see that this was thrown away without anybody being allowed to get hold of it.
I know for a fact that if the attendant had not already had his own meal, he would have it served on Bhagavan's leaf!  But
Bhagavan was not aware of this or there could have been trouble.


One day Bhagavan noticed a young girl hanging round and watching Him eating.  She was obviously waiting for something.
Eventually He asked the doting parents, who were watching with admiration, what it all about.  They explained that she was waiting
for His leaf from which to take her own meal.

Bhagavan was very angry. So as a punishment to all who had allowed such things to happen, He said that in future, He would
remove His own leaf and throw it outside, so that no one might get hold of it.  Everybody was upset at this, one reason being
that by then Bhagavan's rheumatism was so bad that to try and carry His leaf and at the same time support Himself with His
stick would render Him unable to hold onto the rail at the side of steep steps that led out of the dining room.  But Bhagavan was
adamant.

To save the situation, a lady devotee said that she herself would be responsible for seeing that Bhagavan's leaf was removed
without anybody being allowed to handle it.  This Bhagavan would not at first allow, for why make an exception in His case?
So a compromise was reached. In future all leaves would be left in the dining room and were to be removed together by one
of the servants.  At first the lady said that she herself would do it, but the servant soon took her place and this customs
persists to this day.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.)

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #643 on: November 25, 2014, 01:39:21 PM »
In the first year of my settling in Tiruvannamalai, I remember one afternoon when I was sitting in the Hall and Bhagavan
was explaining a particular spiritual point to me. During the discussion, He asked me to go to one of the two almirahs
that were up against the west wall and bring Him a certain book.  I searched for the book but was unable to find it.
I returned to Bhagavan, informed Him, of my failure to locate the book, and again sat down against the south wall
facing Him. 

Presently, I saw Bhagavan slowly and majestically walk over to the almirah, open it, and immediately pull out the book
He asked me to find out.  He closed the almirah and, to my surprise, instead of walking back to the couch, He came
and sat on the floor right next to me, on my left. He opened the book  to the page He wanted me to read out and,
holding it in His right hand, held the book before my face, and asked me to read the particular passage.

Bhagavan's attendants had told me that His body was like a furnace. Only then, when He sat so close to me, did I understand
what they meant. I felt spiritual power emanating from His body-like an electric dynamo. I was thrilled to the core of my being.

N. Balarama Reddy's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.           
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #644 on: November 26, 2014, 01:21:36 PM »
An American lady who was traveling in India in he cause of birth control, came to visit the Asramam.  She asked Bhagavan
if the birth control were not a good thing seeing how the world was rapidly becoming over populated, especially India
where already there was not enough food to go round.  Bhagavan only smiled.

'How you do you hope to control life when you cannot control death?' He asked,. 'Find out rather who it is who is born now.'

Again this some sort of reply was made when someone asked with regard to death penalty, if it was not evil to kill somebody
deliberately, even though done by the State. He hoped for some pronouncement from Bhagavan, but was sadly disappointed.

'If a person is going to die, he will die whatever happens, you cannot prevent it.  He may walk across the road and be killed
by a car.  Any how  die, he will.'

Bhagavan never passed judgement on anything, not even death penalty.  As I have previously stated, there was no good and no
bad for Him, only actions and attachment to actions.  Know the actor and rest there, then all else had absolutely no important.

In this respect, I will quote the Gita II. 27:

'For certain is death for the born and certain is birth for the dead.  Therefore thou shouldst not grieve.

Major Chadwicks's Reminiscences.

Arnachala Siva.