Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 200981 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #615 on: November 11, 2014, 03:15:22 PM »
The following is the English translation made by Devaraja Mudaliar:

The body is impermanent. Whether it is at rest or moves about and whether by reason of prarabdha it clings
to him or falls from him, the Self realized Siddha is not aware of it, even as the drunken man blinded by intoxication
is unaware whether his cloth is on his body or not.

Arunachala Siva/   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #616 on: November 12, 2014, 03:27:04 PM »
Many people said that Bhagavan did not give initiation or have any disciples, although those who lived with Him, had no
doubts as to the relationship existing between themselves and Bhagavan.  I was interested to find out what Bhagavan Himself
had to say on the subject.

So one night after the evening meal the following conversation took place.

Devotee: Bhagavan says that he has no disciples.

Bhagavan: (Looking at me suspiciously) Yes.

Devotee: But Bhagavan also says that for the majority of aspirants a Guru is necessary?

Bhagavan: Yes.

Devotee: Then what am I to do?  I have come all this distance and sat at Bhagavan's feet all these years, has it all been
a waste of time?  Must I now go off and wander about  India in search of a Guru?

Unfortunately, the interpreter himself was so interested in the reply that he could hardly interrupt it to interpret to me fully
what Bhagavan was saying.  I may add here that to act as interpreter between Bhagavan and another was extremely difficult.
Bhagavan talked so fast that sometimes it is  hard to follow exactly what He was saying and the interpreter was to taken
up in trying to understand, and so interested in the subject matter, that he found no time to repeat more than an odd sentence.
They were often too shy to ask Bhagavan to wait, which He would have willingly do, so that they  might tell what He said
sentence by sentence.

But to go on with Bhagavan's reply, the gist of which was as follows:

For the Jnani (the Realized Soul) all are One. He sees no distinction between Guru and disciple.  He knows only one Self,
not a myriad of selves as we do, so for Him how can there be any distinction between persons.  This is for us almost
impossible to understand.  How can He both see distinctions and not see distinctions?  He obviously does.  He can answer
questions,  discuss apparently do all things in the way we do, yet for Him, I repeat, there is only one Self and this life is nothing
but a dream.  However for the seeker the difference between persons is very real. For him there is undoubtedly the relationship
of Guru and disciple.  If such does not exist, 'why has he come all these thousands of miles to this place and remained here?'
For the seeker, God in his Grace takes a form in order to lead him, to the formless state. 'Has he any doubt about it?
Ask him, does he want me to give him a written document? Go and call Narayana Iyer, the Sub Registrar, and tell him to make one out
for him.'  He added humorously 'Go and get the Office Stamp and put it on it. Will that convince him?'   

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #617 on: November 12, 2014, 04:44:46 PM »
On the morning of the Mahapuja on June 25, 1946. I composed Pancharatnam (five verses) in Tlelugu, in praise of Matrubhuteswara,
the Deity of the Asramam shrine.

That morning as Sri Bhagavan sat in front of the shrine, amidst vast crowd, with a fence railings around His seat,
and He jocularly whispered across the rails to Azhamamma (my daughter) who was squatting nearby, 

'See Mother! How they have bound your son and put Him in a jail here!'

G.V. Subbramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #618 on: November 12, 2014, 05:11:03 PM »
Bhagavan did not stop disposing the Asramam authorities favorably to me.  Other instance of His Grace come to my mind,
and this is a good place as any other to relate them.  After one or two days, the Asramam meals would not agree with my
stomach. Even apart from this, I generally take a very small quantity of rice.  Once Bhagavan, observing my leaf plate,
asked, 'How do you manage with so little food?'

I replied 'Even when I take so little my stomach gives trouble after one or two days here. I cannot properly digest even this quantity.'

Thereafter, I have had no more trouble with my stomach even when I stayed continuously in the Asramam and took their meals
both morning and evening.  This shows not only how observant and considerate Bhagavan was but what healing Grace flowed
from Him when He so much noticed our troubles.  If He cared to minister thus to the wants of our body, I personally find it
difficult to believe that He could be indifferent to the wants of our soul, though His ministrations in that line might not so
be obvious, in a hard case like me.

Devaraja Mudaliar's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #619 on: November 14, 2014, 03:07:25 PM »
One day when someone was taking of doing this and that, Bhagavan asked, 'Why do you think that you are the doer? There
lies all the trouble. It is quite absurd, as it is obvious to all that 'I' does nothing. It is only the body that acts, 'I' is always the
Witness.  We so associate ourselves with our thought and actions hat we continually say, 'I did this or that', when we did
nothing at all.   Concentrate on being the witness and let things take their course, they will go on anyhow, you cannot prevent them.'

That is the point!  Things will go on anyhow, but Bhagavan taught that though  we had no power to stop them, we did have
the power to observe them from a detached point of view, as the witness and not as the doer.  That was the purpose of life,
and Sadhana consisted exactly in that.

Bearing directly on the above let me quote from Devaraja Mudalair's 'My Recollections'.

'The only freedom man has is to strive for you and acquire the Jnana which will enable him not to identify himself with the body.
The body will go through the actions rendered inevitably by the prarabdha and man is free to identify himself with the body
and be attached to the fruits of actions, or to be detached from it and be a mere witness of its activities.'

To attain such detachment Bhagavan taught the method of Self Inquiry, 'Who am I?' When we have succeeded in that,
we will see actions as no longer ours but just a necessary working of the whole.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       
       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #620 on: November 14, 2014, 03:22:18 PM »
While Muruganar was teaching us the works of Bhagavan, he used to quote extensively from the scriptures and other ancient
texts.

He said: Veda Vyasa, the author of the Mahabharatha, has talked about our present age Kali Yuga. In the Srimad Bhagavatam
Vyasa clearly stated, that, during the Kali Yuga, human beings can attain Liberation through very easy means, like chanting
of the divine names and the proximity of the Realizaed Souls. In the Arunachala Mahatmyam, we find the declaration that the
mere sight of Arunachala Hill is enough to grant Liberation. Further it states that, if one is unable to go to Arunachala, one just
think of Arunachala with sincere devotion and the thought alone is sufficient to bestow Liberation! In ancient times like Krita
Yuga, Threta Yuga and Dwapara Yuga, Liberation could be attained only through rigorous penance and unswerving devotion
to one's Guru. But we, in this Kali Yuga, are assured of Liberation through much easier practices. Are we not in an enviable
fortunate position?

We now have difficulty in believing that the incidents recorded in the ancient books are authentic.  In the same way, in coming
ages, people are likely to find it difficult to believe the accounts of Sri Bhagavan's life and teachings.  That the young
Venkataraman realized the Great Truth, merely by concentrating on the question of 'what is it that dies?' and that He
was able to attain Self Realization without any formal training or the instructions of a Guru -- these facts are certainly too
wonderful to  be readily believed!  It is certain that in future ages, saints, and sages will tell the story of Sri Ramana
Maharshi to their disciples, and those disciples will listen with the same awe and wonder with which we listen to the
Ramayana and the Maharbharata now!'

For as he spoke these words, Muruganar's eyes filled with tears and his voice became hoarse with emotion.

We can certainly say that just as Bhagavan's life and teachings are sure to provide future generations with inspiration
and Muruganar's devotion to Bhagavan will also serve as an enduring model for ages to come.


Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #621 on: November 14, 2014, 03:28:40 PM »
At this time (1946) a person nick named Vibhuti Swami who was camping some distance from the Asramam, was administering
Vibhuti supposed to be the panacea for all ills and so was attracting huge crowds. On their way they would also enter the
Asramam and have darshan of Sri Bhagavan. Early one morning, seeing the crowd, Sri Bhagavan remarked to me smiling:

'My ill health is really  a blessing in disguise. For, seeing this massaging for me, these people think, 'Poor Swami !
He Himself is ailing, What can He do for us? and so they leave me alone. But if I too dispensed Vibhuti or tirtham
(holy water) I should have been mobbed and smothered!'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #622 on: November 15, 2014, 02:39:14 PM »
One afternoon (1946), Sri T.P. Ramachandra Iyer, Sri Viswanatha Swami and myself and others went in a party to Gurumurtam.
On our way, we were entertained to a rich repast of fine mango by a devotee., Sri Narayana Iyer.  We found that the corner
in Gurumurtam where Sri Bhagavan used to sit was now filled with tobacco bundles emitting a disagreeable odor.  In the mango
grove, near by, we were also shown the spot where Sri Bhagavan had sat motionless in continuous samadhi for months, exposed
to wind and rain, and where for the first time, at the entreaty of devotees, He opened His eyes, looked out at the world and broke
His silence. On our way back we saw Ayyankulam into which Sri Bhagavan threw all His personal belongings on the day of His
arrival at Arunachala. We also visited the temple on its bank which was said to have been sanctified by the stay of His Holiness
Adi Sankaracharya during his pilgrimage.  We were in such high spirits that we started Bhajan led by Sri Viswantha Swami and
continued to sing and dance all the way to the Asramam. Sri Bhagavan graciously inquired about our trip and I reported
everything. Next day the manager of Gurumurtam happened to come for darshan and Sri Bhagavan drew his attention to our
report about tobacco bundles.  The man expressed regret and undertook to remove them immediately and to keep the place
clean and open to visitors.

G.V. Subbaramayya;s Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva. 
     
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #623 on: November 15, 2014, 02:48:57 PM »
Bhagavan was never strong, at least not after about thirty years of age. This was no doubt owing to the strain he inflicted on His
body in the early years in Tiruvannamalai. For years, He suffered from asthma and a photograph taken at Skandasramam shows
Him as little more than a skeleton.  Suddenly after fifteen years, for no apparent reason, the asthma left Him almost entirely
He told me.  But He was always liable to bad colds and had frequent digestive trouble.  Later He had more and more difficulty
in walking. Innumerable oils were tried and He was massaged morning and evening but with very little effect.

One early morning in April 1942, when Bhagavan was returning from His walk on the Hill after breakfast, He had a nasty accident.
One of His favorite squirrels ran across His path as He was descending the stone steps near the Asrmam Dispensary.  This was
being chased by the Asramam dog who was in full pursuit. Bhagavan pushed forward His stick in front of the dog to try to delay
it, and slipped and fell down the steps and broke His collar bone.  This naturally caused a lot of pain. He was treated by a local
bone setter and was entirely cured within two weeks, but while it lasted, it was a most anxious time for all of us.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #624 on: November 15, 2014, 03:15:20 PM »
Bhagavan often used the most ordinary situations to illustrate lofty ideas. Once, during lunch, Subbalakshmi Ammal was
trying to coax Him to take a second helping of vegetable stew.  She said, 'Bhagavan does not eat anything that is hot and
spicy.  This stew is bland in taste. Please let me serve a little more it.'  Bhagavan was not convinced, however!  He said,
'You have already served some of it on my plate. Is that not enough?  Do I have to eat everything with this one mouth alone?
Am I not partaking of every item through so many mouths?  What more is required?'

Though this remark was made in a casual manner, it serves as an illustration of Bhagavan's infiniteness. His total absorption
in the Self resulted in His recogntion of the many as no more than illusory aspects of the 'One'.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #625 on: November 16, 2014, 03:28:40 PM »
In 1947, He was given some medicine for His rheumatism but it had little effect except to bring on a violent act of hiccups
which lasted for many days and the doctor seemed quite incapable of even relieving it. This should never have occurred as
the medicine jacket warned that the patient must be carefully watched for such reactions. But though afterwards Bhagavan
said that He had notice that His urine had become very yellow, and this had been one of the principal symptoms to be
looked for, nobody had noticed it.  We were all much alarmed at the time, but at last the attack subsided of its own accord.
While it lasted the Asramam was in a high state of tension as we all felt quite helpless to do anything.

On February 5th 1949, the tragedy of the final illness had its inception. Bhagavan had been frequently rubbing His left elbow
which was causing some irritation. His attendant inspected this to see what was the trouble and found a small lump the size
of a pea. This He duly reported to the then Asramam doctor.  The doctor decided  that it was only a small matter and should
be removed by a local anaesthetic. No one was consulted, though I was told that He had been warned  that Bhagavan
was no ordinary person and that a number of doctors would willingly come from Madras for a consultation and that He should
wait and do nothing without their opinion. But He was adamant and insisted on carrying on. 

contd.,

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.
 
Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #626 on: November 16, 2014, 03:40:09 PM »
The Singular Taste:

Echamma and Mudaliar Patti used to bring food for Bhagavan everyday. Seeing this, Bose's mother developed the desire to
cook something herself and offer it to Bhagavan.  Bhagavan tried to dissuade the lady saying, 'There is no need for all that.
There are people to take care of these details. You are older than I am. Why do you strain yourself unnecessarily?'

However, she took permission from the Asramam Office and brought a number of dishes next day and with the help of
a servant boy, she brought all the food to the Asramam  kitchen.

Bhagavan entered the dining hall and sat down in His customary place. The lady herself served Bhagavan with her own hands.
As she served each item, she told Bhagavan all about the preparations and the special benefits that particular item could
bestow upon the body. After she had served all the items, Bhagavan gave signal for everyone to start eating. 

He Himself never tasted the items separately. He mixed everything and made them lumps and ate. He said  to a
devotee who knew Hindi: Tell her that there is no need for her to take such a trouble.  She might have expected me to
appreciate each item. But I never taste each item separately. I do not require variety. My taste is singular. All I need is
the One.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #627 on: November 16, 2014, 03:46:24 PM »
On May 28, 1946, a curious letter was written to me by a patriot friend, Sri Ramachandramuni Venkatappa.  He had asked
me to get Sri Bhagavan's prasad for his child. On the above mentioned date, he was thinking of writing to remind me of his
request.  Just then his brother in law Sri Paidipati Pullayya who had returned from the Asramam the previous night, came
and voluntarily gave him the Prasad. Immediately he wrote to me marveling at the power and grace of Sri Bhagavan that he
should receive the Prasad even before writing for it. So now he felt doubly assured of Sri Bhagavan's protection.  He also quoted
saying of Kalidasa :

The token of divine grace send forth good even in advance for them.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #628 on: November 17, 2014, 01:40:25 PM »
One morning in June (1946) Sri Bhagavan, while going up the Hill, told me jocularly about the Golden Jubilee of His
advent at Arunachala proposed to be celebrated on September 1st 1946.  He said, 'Venkatachalam Chettuy had a brain
wave. The idea of such a celebration first occurred to him. And since he made the proposal, it seems to have caught
every one's fancy.'

Thrilled with joy, of this news, I composed the following sonnet that very day:

'At Arunachala, lo and behold!
Wonder of wonders ! This half century
Transcendent Truth Awareness Ecstacy
Itself is living Person doth unfold,
Whose presence all in peace and bliss doth hold,
At Whose one word or glance all doubts do flee,
Who radiant with pure Divinity
Looks out for souls to save and rightly mold.
'I' is Ramana Maharshi, world renowned
God-man, self's Self, embodied Love and Truth,
Ye mortals all, in dense ignorance bound
Come and seek His Grace and see the Light of Truth
Miss not this rarest chance at any rate,
But taste the Blisss of Self ere it is too late.'

At the instance of Sri Bhagavan, I read it out in the Hall. It was later rendered by me into Telugu verse.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #629 on: November 17, 2014, 02:35:11 PM »
After two  other operations done with the Asramam doctor, it was finally decided to call Allopaths from Madras. The
allopaths did things in style, they came down with a lorry load of material and laid on a special circuit from the electric
main for diothermic treatment. As many as  ten doctors attended the operation in which Bhagavan almost passed out
and had to be revived with a blood transfusion.

That night before this operation took place, I went to see Bhagavan and on my knees begged Him not to have it.
It was obvious it could do no good.  Each time the tumor had grown bigger and bigger, spreading up His arm to armpit.
I prayed that this extra suffering was useless and that He would let us be spared the strain but He refused.  For as He said,
the doctors had taken so much trouble, it would be shame to disappoint them now. It was only after the all powerful doctors
had failed and given up all hope that the other treatments were allowed to be tried.  It was by then too late....

The length of this terrible illness of just about one year gave everybody a fair warning that the end was inevitable and not very   
far off. But, out of His Grace, He in this way, saved all from a sudden shock. He also repeatedly warned the devotees that giving
up the body would make no absolute difference.  'Where can I go, I shall always be here!'

Perhaps it would be well if I explained here my apparently condemnatory attitude towards the doctors. It is all summed up
in my belief that we should implicitly obey Bhagavan.  Doubtless we often fail, We are weak and our vasanas are strong
but here was an occasion when we could do so without inconvenience to ourselves., He said, 'Let nature take her course.'
But we have not paid heed to him. In fact, we think we knew better than He. What absolute arrogance!

Major Chadwick's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.