Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 199600 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #585 on: November 04, 2014, 02:55:10 PM »
Translations of Sri Bhagavan's works and Works on Sri Bhagavan:

The first Stotra in praise of Sri Bhagavan, Sri Ramana Stuti Panchakam was composed by Satyamangalam Venkatarama Iyer.

Most of Sri Bhagavan's teachings were in the form of answers to devotees' questions. Kavyakanta Ganapati Muni has
compiled one such answers in the form of Sanskrit verses and has named it Sri Ramana Gita.  He has also translated Sri
Bhagavan's Tamizh work Ulladu Narpadu into Sanskrit under the title Sat Darsanam.  Kavyakanta's Sri Ramana Chatavrimsat,
a work in Sanskrit in praise of Sri Bhagavan is being recited even today at the time of daily Veda Parayana.  The great
Sanskrit Scholar T.V. Kapali Sastri has written in English on Kavyakanta's Sri Ramana Gita and Sat Darsanam and these
commentaries have been translated into Tamizh by Viswanatha Swami.

Sivaprakasam Pillai has compiled Sri Bhagavan's answers  to his queries under the title Who am I? He has also written
several stotras in praise of Sri Bhagavban and the most  popular of these are Sri Ramana Sadguru Malai and Sri Ramana
Pada Malai,Sri Ramana Deva Malai and Sri Ramana Charita Agaval.  Sri Pillai has also written commentaries on Sri
Bhagavan's translations of the Sanskrit works Devi Kalottaram and Sarva Jnanottaram.

Sadhu Natanananda has written Tamizh commentaries on many of Sri Bhagavan's works such as Ulladu Narpadu,
Arunachala Akshara Mana Maalai.

Sri Lakshmana Sarma has written commentaries on Sri Bhagavan's Ulladu Narpadu and Arunachala Stuti Panchakam.

Munagala Venkataramayya has put together Sri Bhagavan's answers to devotees' questions in a book Talks with
Sri Ramana Maharshi.  This has been translated into Tamizh by Viswanatha Swami under the title Bhagavat Vachanamrutam. 
Munagala has also translated into English works like Kaivalya Navaneetam, Vedanta Choodamani and Tripura Rahasyam.

Sri Muruganar has composed Sri Ramana Sanndihi Murai consisting of 1851 Tamizh verses in praise of Sri Bhagavan.
He has also written Guru Vachaka Kovai a collection of 1240 Tamizh verses, outlining Sri Bhagavan's teachings. He
has also written the Tamizh works Sri Ramana Anubhuti and Sri Ramana Jnana Bodham.

Suri Nagamma has written the beautiful Telugu book (Lekhalu) which contains Sri Bhagavan's Teachings,.  This work has
also been translated into English.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #586 on: November 05, 2014, 09:48:25 AM »
Bhagavan would always advise His disciples never to take on the onerous duty of being a Guru.  It would only lead
to trouble.  The disciples would expect all sorts of impossible things from their Guru, and trying to satisfy them,
He would inevitably resort to trickery.  Then, even if He could perform miracles they were the things to be avoided
as being impermanent, and would only deflect him from the true path.

Anantanarayana Rao said that once when he was attending to Bhagavan during His last illness and begging Him to
continue living for the sake of His devotees.  Bhagavan replied: 'The prime duty of a Guru is to establish the certainty
of His existence in His disciples and having done this He is free to leave His body.'  Another proof that Bhagavan
recognized His relationship of Guru to disciples.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #587 on: November 05, 2014, 11:40:53 AM »
Skandasramam:


Early in December I learnt that Skandasramam, the former residence of Sri Bhagavan on the Hill, had been repaired and that
Sri Bhagavan spent a day there with devotees.  On my inquiry, the Asramam wrote on December 10, 1945:

'The story about Skandasramam is something of a romantic dream.  Some Rajah from the United Provinces who was
naturally fascinated with Skandasramam, offered to contribute liberally for its repair. When that was pleased to spend the day
at Skandasramam, and about that has been in disuse for a long time, and he offered to get it relaid.  When that was also done,
Sri Bhagavan was pleased to spend  the day at Sknadasramam and about five hundred devotees came there.  Food,. etc.,
arrangements were made for all these.  In his last letter the Rajah suggests the supply of electricity to the Skandasramam
which means lighting up the entire Hill path of nearly one mile.  Just prior to taking up of the Skandasramam work and of
re-laying the path, a pukka stone culvert was constructed at the commencement of the path adjoining the Asramam rear,
the cost of this culvert construction being the contribution of Sri N. Balarama Reddy of Utukuru.  Even the laborers who
now worked at the Skandasramam are the children and descendants of those who in former days first built the Asramam.
That devotion binds the devotees is the one outstanding fact. May, by Sri Bhagavan's Grace, this devotion ever increase
and expand so as to embrace the whole humanity!'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #588 on: November 05, 2014, 01:22:21 PM »
The Adminstrative  Ability of Niranjananda Swami:

In 1919, when  Sri Bhagavan was in Skandasramam, the entire Tiruvannamalai was deserted because of the plague.
So the Asramites dd not go for bhiksha.  Also there were very few people in the Asramam. It was at this time, I came to
Tiruvannamalai to see Sri Bhagavan.

When things became normal, we considered gong for bhiksha again.  But with the food supplied by Echammal, Mudaliar
Patti and Kannammal and with the amount given by K.R. Venkatasubramania Iyer of Calcutta, and others, we decided to
prepare food in the Asramam itself.  The responsibility of sending the necessary provisions everyday was shouldered by
Gambhiram Sesha Iyer. After him, Vasudeva Sastri did that job as long as we were in Skandasramam.  When we moved
to Mother's Samadhi, Dandapani Swami looked after these arrangements.  After him, Gopal Rao took charge. Also it
was through Gopal Rao's efforts that the Old Hall, where Sri Bhagavan sat for twenty four years showering grace on all
devotees was built.

In 1930, Niranjananda Swami became Sarvadhikari of the Asramam.  Over the Samadhi of Mother, he constructed a temple
at cost of Rs 2.00 lakhs. It was begun in 1930 and the Kumbabhishekam was performed in 1949. The architect was Vaidyanatha
Stapati of Karaikudi.

During Niranjananda Swami's regime, guest houses within the Asramam, the Morvi Guest House, the Veda Patasala,
the big kitchen, dining hall, store room and the dispensary were constructed.  He was responsible for buying the house
in Tiruchuzhi where Sri Bhagavan was born and the house in Madurai where Sri Bhagavan had the death experience.

Whatever he did, he did well and in a grand manner.  He wanted to give the devotees good and nourishing food. He did not
worry about his own physical discomfort or expenses. He used to get the best variety of of everything.  He was very generous
and broad minded.

In 1946, Sri Bhagavan completed fifty years of His stay in Arunachala. The Golden Jubilee was celebrated on a grand scale.

After the nirvana of Sri Bhagavan, a committee of seventeen with Niranjananda Swami as President was appointed to
look  after the affairs of the Asramam. Niranjananda Swami did his work with dedication and enthusiasm and attained
Samadhi in his 68th year on 29th January 1953.  His Samadhi is opposite to the Mother's Temple and puja is performed
there everyday.  Venkatesa Sarma has written a fine poem praising the services of Niranjananda Swami.

After Niranjananda Swami attained Samadhi, his son T.N. Venkataraman became the President of the Asramam.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
                         
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #589 on: November 05, 2014, 02:26:13 PM »
Farewell to Rituals:

In the early days of his life at Sri Ramanasramam, Muruganar used to perform the ritualistic ceremonies prescribed for the
death anniversaries of his parents. Once on the day of his mother's anniversary, Muruganar came to the kitchen very early
in the morning.  He washed his dhoti and hung it up to dry.  Then with a towel around his waist, he set about getting the
vegetables ready.  While Muruganar was thus engaged, Bhagavan entered the kitchen. One glance at the dhoti drying on the
clothesline, and the sight of Muruganar clad in a wet towel told Bhagavan everything.  He said to Muruganar, 'It is your mother's
annual ceremony today, is it not?  Have you made all arrangements?  Where are the Brahmins?  Before Muruganar could
reply, Bhagavan Himself continued.  Tapping Himself on the chest, Bhagavan said, 'I can  be one of the Brahmins. We need
one more and I think Ranga Rao as the second Brahmin.  Will that be alright?' Muruganar knew well that Bhagavan did not
consider rituals important.  Yet here He was making arrangements for the ceremony Muruganar had to perform on that day,
planning even the smallest details!  Muruganar felt so moved that he could hardly keep himself from breaking down completely.
Muruganar felt that, at the very instant that Bhagavan tapped His own chest, and said, 'I will be one of the Brahmins for the
ceremony', not only his parents but several generations of his ancestors would have attained liberation.  Muruganar never
again felt it necessary to perform the annual ceremony of his parents. 

Though Muruganar stopped performing the ceremony on the next death anniversary of his mother, he brought a large jackfruit,
with the intention of giving some fruit to everyone, in the Asramam, in memory of his mother. Bhagavan saw Muruganar with
the jackfruit and remarked, 'It is you mother's anniversary, is it not?  I see you have not yet managed to get rid of these
sentimental attachments!'  Hearing this, Muruganar, exclaimed, 'I will never do such a thing again.' Even  belief in rituals
can bind one, and Bhagavan was very particular about breaking everyone one of the ties binding His disciples. Is this not
a sure sign of Bhagavan's extraordinary concern for His disciples?

Once, Bhagavan was talking to Muruganar about certain books.  Muruganar was giving Bhagavan a detailed account of the
contents of each of these books.  After listening attentively to all these particulars, Bhagavan remarked, 'Ultimately, all these
books are saying the same thing. Only the descriptions and illustrations differ from one book to the other. The routes might
differ, but the destination is the same.' Muruganar readily agreed, saying, 'Yes, That is true, after reading all these books,
we feel that it has been a waste of time.'

Bhagavan replied, 'But unless you read the books how can you get to know that they are all saying the same thing?  Until
you read them, there would always be the tantalizing thought that there might be some new revelation in one book or the
other.  Only when you have read them, can you feel certain that there is nothing to be gained from studying them. This
is like saying that one has to perform rituals, before one can truly appreciate the fact that the rituals are not needed, or
that only through engaging oneself in various forms of worship one can get to know that performing puja is not very important
for spiritual realization.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #590 on: November 05, 2014, 02:39:29 PM »
Viswanatha Brahmachari:

He came to the Asramam in 1923, when he was barely nineteen without informing anyone. His father who did not like
the son going away from home, somehow guessed that he must have reached Arunachala  and landed at the Asramam
in search of his son.  The father knew the Maharshi as Venkataraman several years earlier. But on seeing the Maharshi
in the new place, he was astonished and said, 'This is not the Venkataraman I used to know.'  To this Bhagavan replied
smiling, 'Oh, he!  It is quite sometime since he vanished.'  After speaking of Viswantha, Bhagavan said, 'By the time
he left his home he had acquired some knowledge of Sanskrit at least, I did not have even that when I left home.'

Viswanatha Brahmachari had a great devotion to Ganapati Muni also, and associated himself with him and studied all
his works.

Viswanatha Swami has compiled Sri Bhagavan's Ashottaram, (108 Names) apart from translating many of his works
either from Tamizh to English and from Sanskrit to Tamizh.

Suri Nagamma:

She could be described as Ramana Putri. She was widowed very young and came to Bhagavan's presence in 1941.  From
1945 to 1950, she recorded in the form of letters the conversations and events which took place in Bhagavan's presence.
To facilitate this work she spent most of her time in the Asramam.  These were collectively published as Sri Ramana
Ashrama Lerkhalu in Telugu or Letters from Sri Ramanasramam in English.  Bhagavan was very affectionate to her after
seeing her ardent devotion to Sri Bhagavan.

She has also written her reminiscences about Sri Bhagavan and the Asramam.

Krishna Bhikshu's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #591 on: November 06, 2014, 12:12:06 PM »
Offer of Job in Punjab:

In the last week of December, I went to the Amritsar in the Punjab in connection with an offer of Chief Professorship in
English from the Central Khalsa College there. At the outset, I sought Sri Bhagavan's advice whether to accept the offer
or not.  The Asramam replied on December 12, 1945 saying:

'The matter referred to you in your Telugu letter will have far-reaching consequences.  Sri Bhagavan's Grace alone, which
is the most potent force any one can invoke, must lead you.  May it do so.'

Circumstances compelled me to decline the offer eventually and the net result was that I could not attend Sri Bhagavan's
Jayanti celebrated  in the Asramam on December 21, 1945.  By Sri Bhagavan's grace my journey to and fro from Amritsar
was converted into a pilgrimage as it provided opportunities to visit the sacred shrines on the way.  Especially the Golden
Temple in Amritsar and at the Lakshmi Narayana Temple in New Delhi.  Also later at the time of post partition communal
massacres in Amritsar, I realized how my non acceptance of the offer was the saving Grace of Sri Bhagavan.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.


Arunachala Siva.
   
   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #592 on: November 06, 2014, 12:27:20 PM »
A piece of grit in the eye:

About 1939, my room was not yet ready and I was staying in that of Yogi Ramiah. Dr. Melkote of Hyderabad was also
staying in one of the houses opposite the Asramam.  At about 8 O clock one morning, a piece of grit got into my eye
and could not be got out, do what we would. Dr, Melkote examined my eye and said that the grit had got fixed in it and he
would have to take me to the hospital in Tiruvannamalai and try to dislodge it with the instruments available there, and if that
failed, I would have to go to Madras at once for treatment, or the eye would be permanently damaged.  A few visitors had
gathered around and there was one among them whose eye had been damaged exactly as Dr. Melkote said mine would be,
if neglected.

I was thoroughly upset and was telling Bhagavan mentally: I came here Bhagavan, to have a quiet time and enjoy the
peace and happiness of your company.  Is it your will that all this should happen and that I should go  to Madras and
have so much trouble?

After sending up this prayer, I said to the doctor 'Let me put a drop of castor oil into the eye and see if the lubrication
will discharge the grit. Then if necessary, we shall go to the hospital.

He agreed. We went together to Bhagavan's Hall. He was reclining on His couch, having just returned from His usual
after breakfast walk. I prostrated myself before Him, with the trouble in my mind, though without telling Him about it.
Then I took a little castor oil from Bhagavan's attendant and went with it to my room,accompanied by the doctor.
By the time we reached the corner where the present dispensary stands, I felt a distinct relief. In fact the pain in my
eye was vanishing. I told the doctor so and he could not understand how there could be any improvement. Anyhow
he decided to examine my eye again, drop the oil into it and take me to the hospital. When he got to my room,
he examined and found that  there was nothing there to worry me.  We did not even put a drop  of castor oil!

Devaraja Mudaliar's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.             

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #593 on: November 06, 2014, 01:17:48 PM »
Sadhana  and Sattvic Food:

Bhagavan said that the principal Sadhanas we should practice were to eat only Sattvic food and observe Satsangha.  He
laid down no other rules.  He said that the mind was entirely created by the food that we ate which must be healthy and
strictly vegetarian.  However He never interfered with people or enforced such things on them.  The food in the Asramam
was very hot, South Indians being used to eating such food but Bhagavan did not complain, He Himself was a Southerner.
His attitude was that they know what to do and if they preferred not to do it the way that was their look out. However, He
was dead against meat eating.  Once in my early days, someone spread the rumor that I was preparing meat dishes in my
kitchen. It was, of course, a lie, my food was actually much more Sattvic than the Asramam food. When Bhagavan heard
this story, He  said. 'We don't want that sort of thing here.'  (Somewhere it is also said that Annamalai Swami was asked to
search his room for any meat items, but he found none.)

As regards Satsangha, since we obviously take on the color of the company we keep, the ideal is to live with a Realized
Sage, but if that is not possible, then we should choose our company in the best way we can, avoiding undesirable
company.  He never taught morals, and had no special abhorrence of sex. He once said in answer to a troubled disciple
in my hearing, "it is better to do it than to be always thinking about it." This reminds one of the Gita, 'Thoughts are acts
in fancy." Always thinking of it is repeatedly doing it. He naturally expected Sadhus to lead a decent life and set an example
to others. In any case we should practice moderation in all things, even in those that we consider good, and, strange though
it may seem, a moderation in our Sadhana is also recommended.  Overdoing of austerities and prolonged and unnatually
forced meditation may eventually lead to madness, unless we do such under proper guidance.


Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   
               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #594 on: November 06, 2014, 01:28:15 PM »
Munagala Venkataramaiah:

He was a government official holding a high position. Round about 1925, he lost his job. Initially he stayed at the Asramam
with his family and consulted Bhagavan in regard to all his family matters. One night he and his younger children were asleep in the
Hall. About midnight, he heard Bhagavan say, 'Why did you come here at this time. Won't the children be afraid?'  When
Venkataramaiah opened his eyes he looked around, he saw a huge snake go out of the window past the children.  He was
astonished at this. Venkataramaiah's daughter, Kamakshi was an Asramam child. Her  husband Ramachandra Kaundinya
also was a great devotee of Bhagavan.

Venkataramaiah helped Bhagavan's devotees a lot. He acted as an interpreter for them in the interaction with Bhagavan
and compiled those conversations in three volumes (now one volume) entitled Talks with Ramana Maharshi.  He also
translated into English Tripura Rahsyam.

Krishna Bhikshu's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #595 on: November 06, 2014, 02:15:03 PM »
Keerthi Tiru- agaval:

Muruganar recounts an anecdote in Keerthi Tiru-agaval of Sri Ramana Sannidhi Murai.  He used to stay in Palakottu
and go to Tiruvannamalai town every morning  to beg for alms. Sometimes, he would feel disinclined to undertake
this trip into town and, on those days, he simply went without food. On several occasions, Muruganar fasted for an
entire day.  One of these days happened to be the Sivaratri day, though Muruganar himself was not aware of the fact.
The next morning,  Bhagavan asked Muruganar to go around the Hill with Him.  Muruganar set off enthusiastically enough
but soon, he started feeling the effects of previous day's starvation.  When Bhagavan saw Muruganar's exhaustion, He
exclaimed, 'Oh, Did you fast yesterday for Sivaratri?  See how tired you are now. All right!  Now come to the Asramam with
me and have a proper meal.'  Bhagavan took Muruganar to the Asramam and saw to it that he got enough to eat, instructing
the attendants to serve Muruganar with particular care.  Muruganar was so moved by Bhagavan's solicitude that even after
many years he could not talk about  this incident without tears in his eyes.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #596 on: November 07, 2014, 12:47:27 PM »
I once saw Bhagavan appear really angry, the atmosphere in the Hall was electric. One felt afraid.  The occasion was the visit
to the town of a popular Swami who initiated all and sundry, in fact anybody who came to him, without any sort of preparation.
He taught them a form of breath control which proved very dangerous to those who practiced it without observing certain
necessary restrictions.  He was quite the fashion for a short time but luckily was soon forgotten and those few who did practice
his teaching duly lapsed. There were, however a number of casualties by the  way side of those who went insane. Swami
Ramdas speaks about this man in one of his books. Two of this Swami's disciples came to the Hall one evening just before
the meal. They asked Bhagavan some questions which He readily answered, but they would accept none of His answers and
tried repeatedly to put Him in the wrong.  Bhagavan was very patient with them and tried for long time to put them right;
but at last their impertinence became such that Bhagavan flared up and went for them in a frightening way, but they were so
hardened that it seemed to have but little effect. They were eventually ejected from the Hall forcibly and driven from the
Asramam, Bhagavan remarking that 'they came here to try and undermine this teaching.'       

Bhagavan showed  no sign of anger immediately the men left the Hall, and no ripple of disturbance was left, it had all been on the
surface. Someone coming into the Hall afterwards and asking some quite ordinary question, Bhagavan replied quietly as if
nothing had happened, the whole incident was obviously completely forgotten.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #597 on: November 07, 2014, 03:31:55 PM »
I recalled to Bhagavan an incident which had been reported to me by some friends of mine at Chittoor.  Three friends
of mine had gone to Tirupati in a car, and on their return were prevented by some circumstance from travelling in that car;
a little later the car met with an accident, its axle being broken.  My friends reported this incident to me as an act of grace towards
them from Lord Venkatesa.  And at, at that time, asked them, though in no spirit of irreverence, why God could not have
prevented the axle from breaking instead of just preventing them from being in that car when it broke. They could not give
me any explanation of this.

Now, I asked Bhagavan the same question: 'Why should this visitor have been first deprived of his bag and thus put to a lot
of trouble and anxiety, and then relieved (This is an another incident).  God's Grace could have saved him from the loss of the bag
in the first instance, just as I told my Chittoor friends they could have been saved by preventing an accident to the car.'

After a short pause, Bhagavan replied: 'Then there would have been no occasion for the parties concerned to think of God or His
Grace.' So, now I understand why such things happen.

Devaraja Mudaliar's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.,           

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #598 on: November 07, 2014, 03:43:13 PM »
Preface to Sri Dakshinamurti Stotram:

Early in January 1946, I received from Nagamma a copy of Sri Bhagavan's recent rendering into Telugu of His own
Tamizh translation of Sri Sankaracharya's Hymn in praise of Lord Dakshinamurti.. Sri Bhagavan wrote as follows:

'Brahma, the Creator of the Universe, had four sons born of his mind, namely Sanaka, Sananda and Sanatkumara and
Sanatujata.  They heard from their father that they were intended to help in such works as the creation of the Universe.
But they were averse to the work and they desired Peace. So they went in search of those who could show the way
to Peace. As they were fully ripe for initiation, that Embodiment of the Highest Grace, the Supreme Lord Himself appeared
before them as Dakshinamurti in the Silence of Self abidance with chinmudra (the sign of pure Consciousness). Seeing
Him, they were attracted like iron to the magnet and in His Presence they remained, like Him in Self abidance.

'To the most competent persons who cannot however recognize the truth of silence of Self abidance, Sri Sankaracharya
has explained in brief in this poem the Universality of the Self, namely, that the Sakti (Power) that manifests as the obtrusive
Universe, the onlooker and the visual light, and subsides, is none other than the Self and so is all full of Self.'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.             

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #599 on: November 08, 2014, 02:40:45 PM »
The Ultimate Truth:

During one conversation, with Bhagavan, I remarked that I tried to shake off the body.  Bhagavan replied that man discards
his clothes and remains naked and free, but the Self is unlimited and not confined in anyway  to the body, so how can the body
be shaken off?  Where can the Self leave it?  The Self is all embracing.  Wherever it is, is the Self.  The ultimate Truth is so
simple, it is nothing more than being in one's own natural original state.  However, it is a great wonder that to teach a simple
truth a number of religions should be necessary and that so many disputes should go on between them as to which is
God ordained teaching.  What a pity!  Just be one's Self, that is all.

I remarked that people did not want simplicity.  'Exactly' replied Bhagavan,'they want something elaborate, and mysterious,
that is why many religions have come into existence. For example, the Christian will not be satisfied unless he is taught that
God is somewhere hidden away in Heaven, and cannot be reached without the help of the Church.  Christ alone really knew
Him and it is Christ alone who can guide us to Him. But if they are told the simple truth, 'The Kingdom of God is within you',
they are not satisfied and read some complicated and far fetched meaning into it.  It is only those who are mature that can
understand the matter in its naked simplicity.'

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.