Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 201646 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #570 on: November 01, 2014, 02:44:50 PM »
From the moment Bhagavan came to the Asramam, several people with varied objectives and aspirations visited Him.
Some visited Him wondering if in modern times a Maharshi could be found at all, some visited Him considering Him to
be a sacred presence, some others visited Him in the hope of getting their desires fulfilled, by a mere darshan, yet others
visited Him out of disenchantment with worldly life and sought refuge at His feet. The lives of many got transformed by
Sri Bhagavan's darshan and they became happy.  Such visitors also would extol in various ways Bhagavan's grace towards
them. Some wrote hymns either in Tamizh or in Telugu in praise of Sri Bhagavan. Among them were Swami Pranavananda,
Muruganar and Ramaswami Iyer. Some composed songs in Sanskrit. Narayanaswamy Iyer compiled Maharshi's Talks.
Lakshmana Sarma expounded Bhagavan's philosophy in his Maha Yoga, Those who translated Bhagavan's works into other
languages and those who spread Bhagavan's glory all over the world were also there.

Krishna Bhikshu's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #571 on: November 02, 2014, 12:19:27 PM »
Many people identified Bhagavan with Dakshinamurti, the silent Guru. For though He was not so taciturn as many people made
out, He did have profound silences when He spoke to His disciples in their hearts.  People would come to Him bursting with
doubts, would sit in His presence and go away without asking a single question, all their doubts cleared. He Himself said,
'Silence is the best Upadesa, but it is suited only for advanced pupils.  Others are unable to draw full inspiration from it, therefore
they used words to explain the Truth.  But Truth is beyond words.  It does not admit of explanation. Lectures may entertain
individuals, for a few hours. without having an effect upon them, whereas the result of silence is permanent  and benefits all.
Even though it is not understood, that does not matter. Oral lectures are not so eloquent as silence.  It is unceasing eloquence.
The primal Master Dakshinamurti is the ideal and He taught in silence.'

In every South Indian temple, on the southern wall, is found an image of Dakshinamurti (the god facing the south) to whom
daily worship is offered. He sits under a banyan tree. At His feet are His four disciples. His left leg rests across His right knee
and his right foot is placed on a figure representing the mind or ego.  He has four arms. One hand blessing with mystic sign
known as Chinmudra, the other three holding respectively, fire, (enlighenment), a book (wisdom) and the drum (or the
damaru, the creative sound).

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #572 on: November 02, 2014, 12:39:02 PM »
Daily Routine of Sri Bhagavan:

Sri Bhagavan would get up and go out at 3.30 am in the morning and come back and sit on the sofa at 4 am.  In the meantime,
devotees would come into the Hall for meditation in His presence. He would go for His bath at 5.30 am and return to the Hall
at 6.15 am.  When the bell rang at 6.30 am for breakfast, Sri Bhagavan and others would go to the dining hall.  He would
go for a short walk on the Hill after breakfast, and return to the Hall at 7.30 am. Devotees would also come. Sri Bhagavan would
answer questions occasionally.  He would look through the Asramam mail at 8.30 am. He would go towards gosala at 9.45 am
and return to the Hall at 10.00 am. Lunch was at 11.30 am. About 12 noon, Sri Bhagavan would walk towards Palakottu and
return to the Asramam at 1.00 pm. Devotees would start coming in at 2.00 pm. All would be given coffee at 2.30 pm. First it
used to be given to Sri Bhagavan and then given to about fifty people.  When the number increased, it was found that some
devotees could not get coffee.  Sri Bhagavan said that coffee should be given first to the devotees and He would take it last.
Because of this, whatever was available was shared equally by all.

In the dining hall too, only after others were served  would He allow Himself to be served.  This is a rare phenomenon.

To my knowledge, neither in the Asramams nor in Maths, is there any custom for feeding the poor first.  In the Asramam
of Sri Bhagavan, the embodiment of compassion, daily about fifty  (now about three hundred to four hundred ) poor
people were fed about 11.00 am.  and only at 11.30 am, Sri Bhagavan and devotees would take their food.  On Sri Bhagavan's
birthday also, poor feeding would take place on a large scale at 11.00 am. Even  today poor feeding is done everyday.  It is
a tribute to the efficacy of the Asramam administration.

During Sri Bhagavan's life time, letters used to be replied to on the same day they were received and that practice still
continues.  About 4.00 pm. outgoing letters used to be shown to Sri Bhagavan, He would point out only typographical
errors or omissions.  He would go for a walk on the Hill at 4.30 pm. and return to the Hall at 5.00 pm.  Immediately Veda
Parayana would begin.  The Tamizh parayana would begin at 6.45 pm, and end at 7.30 pm. at which time the bell for supper
would ring. After supper, Sri Bhagavan would go to the gosala and return to the sofa. Some would ask questions and some
would meditate. At 8.45 pm devotees would go to their respective places.

Sri Bhagavan would recline on His sofa in the Hall.  When He got up at 3.00 am. and when His look was directed to us,
we would be awakened by its brilliance.  I have experienced this myself.  The above mentioned routine was carried out
by Sri Bhagavan without looking at any clock!

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

           
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #573 on: November 02, 2014, 12:52:13 PM »
Farewell Prayer:

On June 19, 1945, I wrote my Farewell Prayer in six Telugu stanzas. In them the poet blesses Sri Bhagavan addressing Him
as 'The Supreme Reality, the Incarnation of Grace that has taken birth in this world as Sadguru to dispel the distress of devotees.'
The poet complains that his nerves have become too tender and sensitive on account of His many past affections and so he begs
for abhayam (reassurance or refuge).  The poem concludes with the following prayer:

The courage that never quails under any distress
 The equal bearing of honor and shame,
The same benevolence towards all
  The gratitude for other's good deeds,
The sense of fullness that Thou art everything,
  The eternal devotion to Thy lotus feet,
The knowledge that everything happens for the best,
The inquiry 'To whom all these thoughts'
 Who am I?
The consequent subsidence of all thought
 And flash of Reality as Self Realization
O Father Ramana, grant to Thy child.'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   
   
   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #574 on: November 02, 2014, 02:43:02 PM »
Sri Yogi Ramaiah:

There is an old saying, 'It does not matter even if you are not learned. If you are sincere and devoted in your Sadhana,
the results will follow on their own.'  Sri Rama Yogi's life is an example of this saying.  He came from a village, Moperu
near Nellore. His family was well known for its philanthropic dispositions and thirst for knowledge. A peculiar feature
of the family was that in each generation only one male child was born and within a short time of its birth the father passed
away.  The same thing happened in this case also because of which Ramaiah was brought up by his maternal uncle at a
neighboring village.

Young, rich and single, the future Yogi behaved like a spoiled youth for a short time.  At the same time, he had abiding
bhakti for Lord Rama and always wondered if he could become a devotee like Valmiki or a detached person like Kabir, well
known devotees of Lord Rama.  He would constantly repeat the name of Sri Rama.  As good luck would have it, a an early
age a Sadhu by name Sri Brahmananda Teertha Swami became his guru and initiated him in the Taraka Mantra.  The
guru directed him to repeat the mantra five thousand times a day, which Ramaiah did. Once in a fit of detachment, he
set out to go to Kasi.  The guru saw him and asked him whether he had obtained the permission of his mother for the
journey.  When Ramaiah confessed that he did no such thing, the guru advised him to perform his japa in a lonely spot
in the garden of their house and thus dissuaded him from undertaking the proposed trip.  In addition to Japa Ramaiah
resorted to vegetarian food and pranayama, this last, without any guidance. In a short time, he had various spiritual
experiences but soon they passed away.

Once, he had a unique experience where everything appeared as a brilliant light. Ramaiah wonderex what it was and tried
to find out its nature from various people but to no avail.  His guru has had also passed away by then. Remembering the
name Arunachala, which he had come across earlier, Ramaiah went there to get his doubt cleared by the Maharshi.
Bhagavan explained the phenomenon as a consequence of Samadhi, to the satisfaction of Ramaiah. Thereupon
he took Bhagavan to be his guru and decided to stay at Arunachala. For a long time, he stayed at the mango tree cave
performing tapas.  Later he built an Asramam at the village where his mother lived and divided his time between the village
and Arunachala.

Owing to his goodwill and love towards all beings, even towards poisonous animals, like serpents, he was never harmed
by any creature.  He had several occult powers. One among those who experienced them was Paul Brunton, who said
because of Ramaiah, he experienced a stillness of mind. Ramaiah's disciples celebrate his Jayanti year after year.

Krishna Bhikshu's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #575 on: November 02, 2014, 03:35:45 PM »
Cashew Nuts:

Once in a while, someone or other would bring some light snacks to the Asramam. Around 3.00 pm in the afternoon.
Bhagavan would sample a little of these snacks and have the rest distributed among the devotees in the Hall.  Somehow,
I developed a desire to bring something for this afternoon snack time. But I had a big problem. I did not possess the
facilities to prepare a sufficient quantity of eatable.  My room was tiny one and all my vessels were rather small.  I was living
alone and I was not equipped for any bulk preparations.  The desire to take some snacks to the Asramam however, remained
strong. After a few days of intense thought, I hit upon a solution to the dilemma. I asked a friend to get some cashew nuts
from Tiruvannamalai town. With the money I gave him, he purchased about 1 kg. of cashew nuts for me. I requested
my landlady Komutti Lakshmi Ammal to let me use her kitchen. She was kind enough to lend me her own vessels. I roasted
the cashew nuts, added salt and pepper powder, and put them in a container and took it to the Asramam.

I was very shy and I had no idea what to do in the present situation. How was I to approach Bhagavan? What  if anything
should I say?  If He were to ask me why I had taken the trouble to prepare something, how was I to answer? These doubts
plagued me all the way to the Asramam.

I managed some how to say to Bhagavan, 'I have brought some cashew nuts.' But I doubt whether Bhagavan would have
heard me at all, as my voice was very low and my speech was quite indistinct. Bhagavan craned His neck and looked into the
vessel I was holding out.  He said 'Oh, cashew nuts, is it?' and nodded His head at me. Then He said to the attendant,
Satyanandam, 'Please take it from  her and keep it aside.' Looking at me, He said, 'Give the vessel to him.' I did as I was told
and after prostrating to Bhagavan I went down and sat down in my usual place.

I had been hoping that Bhagavan would take a few of my cashew  nuts and then have the rest distributed among the gathering.
I waited eagerly for Bhagavan to accept my offering. But He did not even touch the container leave alone tasting the cashew
nuts. I could not understand it all all. Had I done something wrong? My mind was in turmoil.  Throughout that night I was
restless.

The next morning I reached the Asramam for the 5 am Veda recitation.  I returned home, finished my cooking and again
rushed to the Asramam. There was not much crowd in the Hall.  I went up to Bhagavan and prostrated. As soon as I got
up, Bhagavan turned to Satyanandam and inquired, 'Has she been told that cashew nuts were served along with iddlis
at breakfast time?' Satyanandam replied: I have not told her yet.  Then Bhagavan looked at me and said with infinite
compassion, 'They were served along with iddlis' . My heart became full.

Later Venkataratnam told me: Sister!  Yesterday, there were many people here. May be Bhagavan felt that there might
not be enough cashew nuts for everybody.  That must be why He had them put away.  This morning all of us were able
to enjoy the delicacy you had prepared along with iddlis of breakfast.       
                     
Yes. That must have been the reason. In my foolishness, I had  been unable to understand. Bhagavan was not displeased
with me at all. On the contrary, I have received His grace in full measure.  All my doubts and fears vanished and my mind
regained the tranquility that had been temporarily lost.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #576 on: November 03, 2014, 10:24:35 AM »
The accident incurred by Sri Bhagavan when He went to save a squirrel from a poaching dog:

During the ensuing Dasara vactiion I visited the Asramam and was relieved to find that Sri Bhagavan had got over the sprain.
He had incurred an accident when He tried to save a squirrel by throwing His stick between the squirrel and a poaching dog.
Dr. Srinivasa Rao had attended to do the needful. However Bhagavan was having now more of His rheumatic pains in the
joints and was being given massage and electric treatment. There was keen competition among the devotees to do the
massaging in which the doctor devotees as experts had the lion's share.  Sri Bhagavan who fairly distributed His limbs
among the devotees would not however allow more than minimum massaging. Sometimes, He would massage Himself
and while doing so He once humorously remarked:

'These people are doing this in the belief that they will acquire punyam (merit) from it., Why should'nt  I have a share
of the punyam myself!'

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #577 on: November 03, 2014, 10:38:21 AM »
Narasimha Iyer (B.V. Narasimha Swami)

Author of Sri Bhagavan's biography in English and a translation of Bhagavan's Upadesa Saram, he hailed from
Salem.  As a lawyer and a freedom fighter he became quite famous in spite of being made fun of, spoke in his mother
tongue Tamizh in the Madras Legislative Assembly. His domestic life took an unexpected turn when his two sons
met with accident on the same day and died.  With that shock he turned towards spiritual life and came to Arunachala
in 1928.  He stayed in the Asramam for about three years.  He took great pains in collecting details of Bhagavan's life
and obtained written statements from various persons and brought out the biography titled Self Realization. He studied
both eastern and western philosophy and in reconciling them.  He believed that even in deep sleep, the mind is very
much in existence. In support of this belief he cited facts that but for the presence of the mind there could be no recollection
of happiness during sleep or the capacity to wake up at a pre-determined time. He held that the thoughts of the waking
state weakened and resulted in absent mindedness, day dreams, and deep sleep. Bhagavan would try to convince him that in
deep sleep the mind would only be in abeyance (laya) but would not be destroyed (nasa) and that because the mind was so weak
it cold be taken to be practically non existent.

(B.V. Narasimha Swami later turned to Shirdi Sai Baba and built a temple for Sai Baba in Madras.)

Krishna Bhikshu's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #578 on: November 03, 2014, 11:02:40 AM »
Sri Dakshinamurti:

Sri Dakshinamurti's story is as follows:  Brahma was tired of creating and wanted to retire, so he created four Kumaras to
take his place.  But these did not in the least wish to take over but demanded instead initiation from him into the secret of
how to gain liberation.  This their father refused.  So they left him and went in search of this somewhere else.  They eventually
encountered an awe inspiring figure seated under a banyan tree. Here they remained and received the instruction they were
seeking, which was given in silence.  In silence, because no word can express That which is beyond all words and no mind
can grasp that which is beyond mind.  Silence is the most perfect teaching of all.

Dakshinamurti is known as the Silent Guru, the Guru of all Gurus.  Though he is daily worshipped in every Siva temple in
the South, he has few temples of his own.  Dakshinamurti is an aspect of the ascetic Siva.

As an example of how eloquent silence can be for the sincere seeker, the following episode which I personally witnessed
in the Old Hall some years ago will illustrate.  A gentleman from Kashmir came to the Asramam with his servant who could
not speak word of any other language except his native Kashmiri. One night when the Hall was almost dark except for the
pale glimmer of a single hurricane lantern, the servant came into the Hall and stood before Bhagavan in a respectful manner
jabbering something rapidly in his own language. Bhagavan said nothing, buy lay quietly gazing at him.  After a while the
servant saluted and left the Hall.  Next morning, the master came to Bhagavan and complained, 'Bhagavan, you never told
me that you could speak Kashmiri, was it fair?'

'Why, what do you mean?' asked Bhagavan. 'I know not a single word of your language.'

Bhagavan asked the gentleman how he had got hold of this absurd idea and the latter explained:

'Last night my servant came to you and asked you several questions in his language. He tells me that you answered him in
the same language and cleared his doubts.'

'But I never opened my mouth,' Bhagavan replied.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #579 on: November 03, 2014, 01:55:06 PM »
The Biographers of Sri Bhagavan:

The first person to write the biography of Sri Bhagavan was B.V. Narasimha Swami, a lawyer from Salem. He collected the
details from Sri Bhagavan's devotees and sometimes from Sri Bhagavan Himself.  This book in English has inspired many to
join the great family of Sri Ramana devotees.  Paul Brunton's A Search in Secret India is another great book which devotes
three chapters to Sri Bhagavan.  The editor of Sunday Times, M.S. Kamath, wrote the book Sri Maharshi with 117 illustrations.
This book became so popular that it was translated into many languages, including Tamizh, Telugu, Malayalam, Hindi, Kannada
and Gujarati.  Then there is Arthur Osborne's famous book Ramana Maharshi and the Path of Self Knowledge, which remains one
of the greatest biographies of Sri Bhagavan.

The most famous biographies in Tamizh are Sudddhananda Bharati's Sri Ramana Vijayam and the Life and Teachings of Sri
Bhagavan by M.G. Shanmugam.

Krishna Bhikshu's Sri Ramana Leela in Telugu and Sri Ramana Charitamruth in Hindi written by his brother Oruganti
Vankatesa Sarma, are also popular works.

The credit for writing Sri Bhagavan's biography in Malayalam goes to Ekkannathu Appunni. Swami Pravananada has written
Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi in Kannada.  He has also translated several of Sri Bhagavan's works in Kannada.  Madhava
Tirtha Swami has written Sri Ramana Charitamruth in Gujarati.

Ramanananda Saraswati Swami, a Gujarati Scholar and philosopher is responsible for spreading Sri Bhagavan's fame
in Gujarat and Africa through his Gujarati translation of Sri Bhagavan's writings.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #580 on: November 03, 2014, 02:52:38 PM »
The Telegram:

Even though my parents agreed to let me stay in Tiruvannamalai, they were very much concerned about my well being.
They felt that I was too young and inexperienced to live all alone so far away from the rest of the family. Seeing my
resolve, they were forced to let me go but they were not really reconciled to the situation. Just before I left home, my
father said to me, 'You are going to Ramanasramam to follow your spiritual pursuits under the guidance of Bhagavan.
You have my blessings. But before you go, I would like you to promise me something. If ever I send for you, you should
not hesitate to come home.' I knew that my father's affection and concern for me were the reason for extracting such a
promise from me. So I agreed to his condition and left for Tiruvannamalai.

A few months after my arrival at the Asramam, I got a telegram from my father, telling me that he was not well and asking me
to come home immediately. The news was so shocking that I did not know what to do.  I went to see Appu Sastri, who lived
in another portion of the same house in which I had my room. Appu Sastri was a disciple of Kavya Kanta Ganapati Muni. He was
also a family friend of ours, and knew both my father and my uncle quite well.

Appu Sastri read the message and immediately took me to the Asramam. Bhagavan was sitting on the sofa when we arrived
at the Asramam. Appu Sastri went up and showed the telegram to Him. Bhagavan read it and said, 'Oh, This says that Kanaka's
father is sick and he wants her to come home immediately.  Who will take her to the station and put her on the train?'
Appu Sastri said, 'I will take care of the arrangements myself, Bhagavan.'  Bhagavan appeared satisfied and then gave me
leave, with a smile.

Appu Sastri took me back home., He arranged for a ticket on the train going to Katpadi. He arranged a bullock cart in time
to catch the train.  I caught the train and traveled up to Katpadi.  I got off and caught another train to reach our hometown.
When I reached home, I was relieved to find my father's condition had improved considerably. He was now out of danger,
and was gradually regaining his strength. 

Meanwhile, as soon as I left for the station, a second telegram had arrived at the Asramam. Appu Sastri opened it and
read the message.  'Father better. You need not come now.' At once Appu Sastri told Bhagavan about it.  Bhagavan said,
'If this message can be conveyed to Kanaka, she will be able to return to the Asramam.  One of the devotees said, 'The train
would have arrived by now.'  Bhagavan said, 'Is that so? Would it have arrived so  soon?' The matter was then dropped.

Appu Sastri wrote me a letter giving all these details and inquiring about my father's health.  When I read the letter I was
overcome with emotion. I was moved by this evidence of Bhagavan's concern for me.  I felt thrilled that Bhagavan had
made such kind inquiries about me.  I longed to get back to the Asramam immediately.

I showed Appu Sastri's letter to my father. He said, 'Oh, I am very sorry. I should not have been so hasty. But at first,
the situation really appeared quite bad and that is why I wanted you to come at once.  But after dispatching the telegram,
there was some improvement.  I thought I should save you the trouble of coming all the way. So I arranged for the second
telegram, hoping it would reach you before you left the Asramam.  But it  seems to have arrived too late. My dear girl,
now that you have come, please stay with us for a few days.  We would all love to have you with us for a while.'

Kankammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
                             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #581 on: November 04, 2014, 10:18:07 AM »
Suddhananda Bharati:

Author of Bhagavan's biography in Tamizh, he became famous as a journalist and author even quite early in life,
His Tamizh magazine Bharata Sakti is quite well known.  He developed a great liking for national education and in
collaboration with V.V.S. Iyer establishede a Guru Kula in Cheranmadevi. He had an interest in naturopathy as well.
In order to know the essence of all religions he studied all religious texts extensively.  As the implementation of his
lofty ideals needed Sakti, he began worshipping Sakti (Sakti Upasana); towards this end he learned pranayama and had
certain spiritual experiences.

While at the famous sacred Jain spot, Sravnabelagola, studying Jain scriptures, Suddhananda had a desire to have
Bhagavan's darshan. When he reached the Asramam, Bhagavan's physical body could not be seen by him but only
a column of light and later a Siva Linga. Subsequently, Bhagavan's physical form appeared before him. Suddhananda
prostrated before Bhagavan and later before Ganapati Muni who was close by. Bhagavan said to Ganapati, 'Is it not
Suddhananda the author of Bharata Sakti?' Suddhananda was overjoyed at the compliment. Bhagavan asked him to stay
back for food to which Bharati replied, 'Yes sir, But I have come for spiritual food.' Suddhananda did not indulge in
asking several questions, his happiness lay in savoring the mere darshan of Bhagavan.  At that very moment several
Tamizh verses welled up in him.

Bharati spent six months at Arunachala.  In the holy presence his ego got destroyed, and he began referring to himself
in the third person, he became completely inward looking.  In order to continue his Sakti Upasana, he left for Sri
Aurobindo Ashram at Pondicherry.  Bharati's devotion to Bhagavan formed itself into a mellifluous poetic composition
Sri Ramana Vijayam.

Krishna Bhikshu's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
               
   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #582 on: November 04, 2014, 12:32:37 PM »
Birthday party and Self Realization:

On Mahanavami day (1945), which was my birthday, I made pradakshinam round the Hill with Sri R. Narayana Iyer. As we
returned a little late, Sri Bhagavan asked the reason. My friend replied that it was my birthday, I insisted upon taking
breakfast and coffee on our way in the town.  Sri Bhagavan at once remarked:

'I see!  Subbaramayya gave you his birthday party in a hotel but did not invite us all to it!'

The  next day Sri Bhagavan was talking of Self Realization. He said:

'What is Self Realization?  A mere phrase. People expect some miracle to happen, something to drop from heaven in a
flash.  It is nothing of that sort. Only the notion that you are the body, that you are this or that, will go, and you remain
as you are.  Indeed Realization is another name for the Self.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #583 on: November 04, 2014, 01:48:42 PM »
Bhagavan disliked being touched, the only people who were allowed to do so were his personal attendants.  People
would want to place their heads on His feet or place garlands round His neck.  Such a nuisance this became that a
low fence had to be put around His couch to stop people approaching too near.  It was perhaps because of this,
He never initiated by touch.  Surprising as it may seem, some people took strong offence over the fact that they were
not allowed to touch Him, they looked upon Him as a public property and thought that all and everybody had the right
to inconvenience Him as much as they liked.  When some old woman  was pestering Him one day, a man near me was
very indignant  that she was repeatedly stopped.  'Why shouldn't she if she wants to?'  he asked.  Bhagavan's own
convenience was not even considered. 

There are three ways of giving initiation: placing the hands on the person, usually upon his head; giving a mantra
which is whispered in the ear; and through the eyes. It was usually recognized that Bhagavan did it through the eyes
alone, though He never said that He had initiated anybody. It was all done without trappings.  He always refused to
place His hands on a person's head though very many besought Him to do so.  However, I do know of one exception.

An old sannyasin came from Mysore state, he was an ex station master. Bhagavan seemed from the first very
sympathetic towards him and unusually kind. (Though Bhagavan could be nothing but kind to one and all, He did
not always appear so). When he was leaving the Asramam, with friend to act as interpreter, he entered the Hall
which happened to be empty at that time. Bhagavan had just returned from a walk after His mid day meal and was
seated in the couch. The Sannyasin prayed to Bhagavan to place His hands on his head and knelt quite close to the
couch, resting his head against it.  Bhagavan  turned towards him and placed both His hands on his head for a few
minutes without saying anything.  The Sannyasin rose and left the Hall showing great emotion.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #584 on: November 04, 2014, 02:33:34 PM »
Some time before I finally settled down in the Asramam (I think about 1935) when I was staying there for a few days
and occupying one thatched shed out of about half a dozen which then stood almost in line with the room I later built.
I was suddenly roused at about 4.00 one morning by a very vivid dream in which Bhagavan appeared to me and asked,
'Don't you know the song, kaalamE ezhunthiru?... The impression left on my mind was that Bhagavan wanted me to get
up and go to Him.  The song is one which is sung by the pial school students in our parts and I know only the beginning,
which goes, 'kaalamE ezhunthirinthu kaal mukham suththi seithu, kOlamaa neeRaNinthu, guhan aRu mukhanaip pORRi.'
(Getting up early in the morning, washing, wearing sacred ash and worshipping the six facede Lord Subramanya).  Bhagavan       
used to get up very early and by half past three or four He would be engaged with a few devotees cutting vegetables; then
at about five there would be Veda Parayanam.  I generally used to get up only at about 6 and go to the Hall when
Bhagavan was leaving for His bath after the Parayanam.  However, on receiving this reminder, I got up, cleaned my
teeth,washed and ran and prostrated  myself before Bhagavan.  He was cutting vegetables in a room opposite the Old
Hall and south of it.  He gave me a look which said, 'Yes, I am expecting you. I wanted you to come.'  Nothing more
happened, I sat  with Him and then attended the Parayanam, after which I returned  back to my room..... It is my
belief that from the day Bhagavan summonede me to go to Him that early morning, He established a connection with me
and definitely took me up as one of His people whom, He would look after.  This must  have been the initiation by look of
which He sometimes spoke.

Devaraja Mudaliar's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.