Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 201624 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #525 on: October 24, 2014, 03:22:44 PM »
Bhagavan's Wit:

Bhagavan had a marvelous sense of humor.  His sense of timing was perfect.  Every word suited to the occasion, and even
seemingly casual utterances were gems of wit and wisdom.  Bhagavan possessed the unique ability to convey the most
profound truths in the simplest language.

Once Bhagavan happened to spend quite a long time with a particular devotee. For nearly two hours at a stretch Bhagavan
was sitting in the same position.  When it was time for Bhagavan's daily visit to the cowshed, an attendant came and stood   
at the entrance of the Hall, holding Bhagavan's walking stick and the kamandalu in his hands.  Seeing the attendant standing
ready, Bhagavan tried to get up.  But His legs had grown numb from sitting in the same position  for a long time, and Bhagavan
could not get up immediately. 

Bhagavan smiled at the the waiting attendant, and said: 'Wait a minute!  The father of the greatest devotee of Lord Rama
(Anjaneya) has caught hold of my legs.  He is not an ordinary person. Will he set me free so easily?  I can pull out of his grip
only a little at a time.  So you have to wait patiently for a while.'  As He spoke Bhagavan was rubbing a medicinal oil on His knees,
and as a result of the massage, He was able to get up and go out. 

Bhagavan was prone to painful arthritic attacks, especially in the knee joints.

When Bhagavan talked about 'the father of the greatest devotee of Rama' He meant Vaayu, the wind god.  Vayu also means
painful catch due to Vaayu humor in the body.  Thus Bhagavan has chosen to convey the same information in a humorous way.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #526 on: October 24, 2014, 03:40:43 PM »
Advaita and Monism:

Now Advaita is not the same as is usually meant by Monism not is it some catch word to avoid difficulties.  The word means,
of course, Not-Two but this is not the equivalent for One, though to the casual thinker it is not easy to see where the difference
lies. But if we call it Monism then premising one we infer a whole series of one, two, three etc., No such series actually exists.
There is just Not Two.

When we see things we see duality; in one sense this duality is not unreal, it is only unreal in the sense  that there is Not Two.
It is there in appearance but yet is impermanent and fleeting. This fleeting manifestation is called Maya, which is often taken
to mean illusion but actually means 'that it which not', or which sets a limit to the limitless.  In fact we sense everything,
everything being in the mind, and the senses, being only the instrument of the mind.  For as a matter of fact, there is no
illusion, only impermanence.

The same truth is behind all.  What then is the solution, seeing that everything has no permanency and is only appearance?
This, Bhagavan taught, also applies to our bodies and even our egos, which are thought  by us to be all important, but we
find them discarded as fleeing shadows.  There is however, no need to be despondent, for behind even the most fleeting appearance
there must be something to appear.  We jump aside because we think we see a snake only afterwards to discover that it is but
a rope.  But even though the snake is quite unreal the rope is there.  So the obvious solution to our riddle is to search out
and find the permanent behind the impermanent.  This was Bhagavan's solution and He taught us how to do it by His method
of Self inquiry. Though the ego changes minute by minute, though we are entirely different people every stage of our life, there
has always been for us an 'I'. Now this is obviously not the ego, for we have already seen that the ego changes every second,
while the 'I' has there been all along as the observer.  Let us trace it to its source.  And through this method of Self Inquiry
we shall eventually realize the Self.

Sadhu Arunachala's (Major Chadwick's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #527 on: October 24, 2014, 03:47:02 PM »
I attended the Maha Puja in the Asramam which was performed on May, 16. 1944 and stayed on till the end of the month.
One day Sri Bhagavan quoted from Rama Gita a sloka which meant:

The magician deludes the gullible, himself remaining undeluded.  But lo the Siddha (displayer of thaumaturgic powers),
himself first deluded, deludes others.

Sri Bhagavan always discouraged the hankering after siddhis as dangerous diversion from the path of Self Realization and had
translated in Tamizh a portion of Devi Kalottaram which contained condemnation of Siddhis.  Sri Bhagavan now rendered the
above sloka into Telugu verse. 

     
G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #528 on: October 25, 2014, 01:20:11 PM »
Water and Buttermilk:

Another day, Sri Bhagavan cited a sloka which extolled the merits of water as follows:

'In indigestion, water acts as medicine;  when there is no indigestion, water serves as tonic;  water at the end of the
meal serves as Nectar.  But water as the beginning of a meal acts as poison.'

Sri Bhagavan Himself had an aversion to stimulating drinks like Coffee, tea etc., and always preferred water.  He used to drink
water only at the end of His meals, and also occasionally whenever he felt fatigued, as after a walk on the Hill.

Still another day, Sri Bhagavan recollected a sloka which praised buttermilk thus:

'Buttermilk mixed with cardamom, ginger, lemon juice and a little salt is of rare relish even to Indra, the Lord of the Gods.'

Sri Bhagavan Himself liked thin buttermilk prepared in the above way.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #529 on: October 25, 2014, 01:33:14 PM »
Heart may rule the Mind:

When Bhagavan left the body, His devotees, were desolate.  Our grief was intolerable, and we were unable to carry on with
our lives the way we had done before.  In the hope of regaining some degree of mental composure, we requested Muruganar
to explain Bhagavan's Collected Works. Accordingly, Muruganar started his lectures on the Collected Works.  These lectures
went on for about six months.  Muruganar was an exceptional teacher, and his lectures were notable for their clarity and for the
wealth of illustrations, quotations and allusions to other philosophical works.

After Collected Works, one of the works he explained to me was Ozhivil Odukkam. Muruganar told me that the existing commentary
was based on Saiva Siddhanta and that Bhagavan had asked him to write another commentary for the book based on Vedanta.

Muruganar's method of teaching was as revolutionary as it was effective. He would insist upon my reading each verse aloud.
When I, who is unfamiliar with intricacies of the language, made clumsy attempts to read, Muruganar would read the verse
by himself and give broad outlines of its meaning.

At the end of one of our classes, I said, 'Swami! I very much regret the fact that I am not quite familiar with the Tamizh language.
Muruganar replied: It does not matter if these lesons do not leave an impression upon your brain.  It is enough if your heart is
genuinely moved by the poetry.

As he said this, his eyes were filled with tears and his voice became hoarse with emotion.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #530 on: October 25, 2014, 01:45:34 PM »
After I had been meditating in the presence of Bhagavan, for some months, I reached a certain stage, when I would
be overcome with fear.  I asked Bhagavan about this.  I was assured that some of those present in the Hall at the time,
not of course, by Bhagavan, that this was all wrong and quite absurd, In fact they laughed at me for my foolishness.

Bhagavan was not so amused. He explained that it was the ego that experienced the fear, as it felt that it was gradually
losing its grip. It was in fact, dying, and naturally resented it. He asked me: 'To whom is the fear?  It is all due to habit
of identifying the body with the Self.  Repeated experience of separation from this idea will make one familiar with this
state, and then fear will gradually cease.

Since I have come to realize that Bhagavan mentions this fear, in the second verse of the Ulladu Narpadu:

'.... It is only those who fear death intensely take refuge at the feet of the Lord.'     

In fact it is really a good sign when one is following the method of self inquiry, though it must be overcome.

Afterwards, some of the scoffers came up to me secretly and said that had they had the same trouble and what were they
to do about it?  This conversation of mine with Bhagavan must have been recorded somewhere, for still people come to me
to ask about it. There is only one answer as mentioned by Bhagavan to me cited above.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #531 on: October 25, 2014, 03:34:01 PM »
Sri Ramaswami Pillai:

Among those who totally surrendered to Sri Bhagavan, Sri Ramaswami Pillai must be mentioned. His sadhana consisted in
serving Sri Bhagavan and His devotees in the true spirit of a karma yogi.  First he got a picture of Sri Bhagavan from one of
his teachers in Chidambaram.  His teacher told him a lot about Sri Bhagavan. Sri Pillai decided to go and see Sri Bhagavan.

When he saw Sri Bhagavan, Sri Bhagavan was reclining majestically, stretching His legs. 'Like a great king who camps in forest
to hunt dangerous animals, Sri Bhagavan was sitting majestically on the Arunachala Hill, which invites people like us to have our
animal like mind destoyed,' describes Sri Pillai about his first visit to Sri Bhagavan.

Once he had the opportunity of spending a night at Skandasramam with Sri Bhagavan.  A devotee told  Pillai that Sri Pillai
would have go without supper that night as Sri Bhagavan lived only on one meal a day, lunch.  And at that time no food was
prepared or bought for the night.  Sri Pillai did not worry about it as he wanted to stay with Sri Bhagavan. 

Unexpectedly, around 8.30 in the night, Ramanatha Brahmachari came with one half of a coconut and some sweet pongal.
Sri Bhagavan said, 'As there is nothing else to eat, mix sweet pongal and scraped  coconut, add water and warm it and drink
it as gruel.'

When it was ready, Sri Bhagavan asked, 'Do you have sugar or rock candy?' In those days we  used to distribute everything
we received immediately to those present. So there was nothing left.  'We can add salt instead of sugar', said Sri Bhagavan. Even
that was not available. 

Around 9 p.m. there was a knock on the door. Wonder of wonders! At that time, drenched in rain, came two young men
with rock candy and some bananas.  Sri Bhagavan said, 'Oh! We wanted rock candy; now we have bananas too.'   We
powdered the candy and added it to the gruel. 

'I will share this gruel with you and break my 365 days of upavasa.' said Sri Bhagavan.

Every year, wherever he was, Sri Pilai would come to Tiruvannamalai for the Kartigai Deepam. Once he started from Chidambaram
for Tiruvannamalai.  There was disruption of train and bus services due to floods.  In his zeal to reach Tiruvannamalai he set out
on foot.  On the way he found that the bridge he had to cross had been washed away.  So he returned without being able to
cross the river.  He felt miserable that he woudn't be at Tiruvannamalai for the Kartigai Deepam. He wept. At that time he saw
from where he stood that, taking pity on a devotee, Sri Arunachala Ramana gave him darshan of Arunachala and the light on
its top.  After a few years, Sri Pillai settled permanently in the Asramam. With the help of the devotees, Sri Pillai cleared
the path to Skandasramam. He would go to the town on his cycle several times during the course of the day to serve devotees.
People used to call him affectionately 'Cycle Ramaswami Pillai'.

In the Asramam, he planted  a variety of plants and fruit trees, the gardens of the Asramam speak of his efforts. 

Even today early in the morning he chants verses before the shrine of Sri Bhagavan. He explains to sincere devotees the path
of Jnana shown by Sri Bhagavan.

(At the ripe age of 100, Sri Ramaswami Pillai was absorbed in his Master, on January 14, 1994.)

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.,                               

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #532 on: October 26, 2014, 11:14:46 AM »
Yogi Ramiah:

Yogi Ramiah belonged to Nellore in Andhra Pradesh.  He was brought up in the lap of luxury.  He was the only son of
his parents.   He did not pay any attention to his studies and enjoyed good things in life.

In his eighteenth year, he had read the life of Kabir Das. This was the turning point in his life.  He lost all interest in the worldly
life and wanted to follow the spiritual path.

A Brahmin guru asked him to repeat the name of Sri Rama 5000 times. Sri Ramiah asked, 'What will happen if the number
is increased?'  'The benefit will be greater.'  'Suppose, I keep on repeating the name for ever?' Impressed by the fervor of his
disciple, the Guru said, 'You can do it.'

From then on he kept on repeating the name of Sri Rama whatever work he was engaged in.  He was also practicing pranayama,
breath control.  In course of time, he became very detached and decided to leave for Varanasi.  On his way to Varanasi, he
met his Guru, who asked him whether he had received  the permission of his mother to undertake the pilgrimage.  He replied
in the negative.  The Guru said, 'Go back to your village, do tapas in the quiet of your garden. I will come and observe your
progress.' So saying, he left. 

Sri Ramiah went home and started doing tapas.  He was able to meditate for hours on end.  In the early stages he had visions.
Later he felt  only that which shines for ever in the heart as 'I'.  He came to Sri Bhagavan and was greatly enlightened by Him.
He accepted Him as his Guru and lived in his presence for many years. 

Sri Yogi Ramiah passed away on 2nd February 1962.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #533 on: October 26, 2014, 11:23:00 AM »
One Look of a Mahatma:

In the supplement to the Ulladu Narpadu it says that one look of a Mahatma  is sufficient to give us initiation and is far
more effective than any number of pilgrimages, the worship of images and other devotional practices.  I asked about this,
saying foolishly, that I had already been staying with Him for some months and yet I did not yet feel any change in myself.
It is the look that purifies, He told me, but it is not a visible purification.  Coal takes time to ignite but charcoal is proportionately
quicker, while  gunpowder ignites immediately.  So it is with men under the powerful glance of a Jnani.

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva. 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #534 on: October 26, 2014, 11:50:45 AM »
Just a Pipul Tree:

Pichandi was one of Bhagavan's earliest devotees.  He used to visit Sri Bhagavan regularly, right from Virupaksha Cave days.
He was the earliest person to present Bhagavan with a blanket. Pichandi's house in Talagiri Street, was always open to
Bhagavan's devotees and he would press devotees to stay with him for some days.  He used to send some rice to the
Asramam at periodic intervals.

Pichandi's sister, Janaki Ammal, was also a great devotee of Bhagavan. This lady often went around the Arunachala Hill.
Every time she set out for giri pradakshina, she would come to the Asramam and after taking blessings, would continue the
giri pradakshina. She had great love and regard for Bhagavan. She would narrate all her troubles and Bhagavan would listen
to her patiently.  He would console her with soothing words.

One evening Janaki Ammal came to the Asramam. When she entered the Hall, Bhagavan was talking about meditation.  There
was a lady sitting in deep meditation. Janaki Ammal said to Bhagavan, 'You tell new comers how to meditate. How often I have
asked you to initiate me into meditation? But you never granted my request.  Every time I come to see you, you inquire about the
welfare of all members of my family.  If I come here hungry, you press me to eat in the 'Asramam.  But whenever I ask you
to give me spiritual instruction, you just turn a deaf ear. Perhaps you consider that these are enough for me and that I cannot
take any more!'  Even as she spoke, Janaki Ammal's eyes filled with tears.  Bhagavan did not say a single word in reply to her
complaints.  He gave her a compassionate look.  Soon afterwards, Janaki Ammal left the Hall saying, 'So you are determined
to ignore all my pleas. Let me see how long you continue to be deaf to my prayers.'

On another occasion, Janaki Ammal came to the Asramam early in the morning. Bhagavan was in the Jubilee Hall. There were
just a few people in the Hall at that time.  Janaki Ammal prostrated to Bhagavan, went around Bhagavan's sofa and prostrated
once again.  Bhagavan did not like such things. But Janaki Ammal had done it on a few previous occasions, and Bhagavan
had not openly objected. But on this particular day, Bhagavan said to Janaki Ammal, 'Look! If you go around the sofa like this,
all the newcomers will think, 'Oh! This must be the normal practice in this place.  May be we have broken the Asramam rules
by not following the practice.' and everybody sitting here will  get up and start going round and round my sofa. And if I
object to it, they will only say, 'That lady does., So why should we not do the same?' Can you imagine the resulting confusion?
And what would be my situation be? I would be like a pipul tree', said Bhagavan with a smile.

Janaki Ammal simply remarked 'O Bhagavan!  This is all your lila', and continued her giri pradkashina.  The next time Janaki
Ammal started going round the sofa, one of the attendants got irritated and grumbled, 'Look at this lady.  How many times
has she been told not to do this.  May be she likes to draw the attention of others.' 

Janaki Ammal retorted:  This man is like a thorn near the tree laden with ripe juicy fruits.'  (pazhutha marathin atiyil kozhutha
mullu'.

Bhagavan never spoke ill of others.,  However, He corrected the faults of devotees with gentle remarks.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #535 on: October 26, 2014, 12:14:40 PM »
Kavyakanta Ganapati Muni's sloka:

On May 26, 1914, Sri Bhagavan recollected and repeated a Sloka addressed to Him by Kavyakanta Ganapati Muni, in a letter,
which makes reference to Sri Bhagavan's associates of those days.  It ran thus:

"To Him praised by Pazhaniswami who has cast off the trammels of birth, to the Bee that strolls in the lotus heart of
Gambhiram Seshayya, to the doctor that cured the slow witted Krishnayya (Krishna Bhikshu) from the disease of phenomenal
existence, to the Son of the snake adorned God (Siva) appearing in the guise of a Yati (ascetic) I prostrate."

On May 31, 1944, Sri Bhagavan called to mind a Tamizh stanza which He had composed for a picture of Lord Sri Krishna
imparting the Bhagavad Gita to Arjuna. It meant:

"He who seated in Arjuna's chariot, spoke good Words and dispelled Arjuna's distress, may that Embodiment of Grace save us!"

At Sri Bhagavan's suggestion it was used as the invacotory verse for Sri Bhagavan's selections from the Bhagavad Gita. It
was rendered into Malayalam verse by Sri Bhagavan Himself, into Sanskrit Sloka by Sri Jagadeeswara Sastri and into
Telugu verse by me.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #536 on: October 27, 2014, 12:45:59 PM »
Mother Azhagamma:

May 19, 1922 (Dhundhhi year, Vaisaka month) was Her last day.  Everyone could sense the impending end that day.
Yet they had to do whatever possible in a spirit of detachment leaving the result to the Lord. As long as she was conscious,
Bhagavan gave her spiritual instructions.  When she lost consciousness, Ganapati Muni and others commenced Vedic
chants, some others chanted the Rama-nama.

After the violent gasps (urdhva-swasa) began, Bhagavan placed His right hand on her heaving chest, and the left one on her
head.  He looked at her intently.  The day passed that way.  Subsequently Bhagavan Himself narrated how after the soul
went through the future births, and settled in the Heart.    The end came peacefully by 8 in the night.  Among those present
Ganapati Muni, Nranjananada Swami heard a sound metallic, indicative of the Mother's passing away, with her breath subsiding
into the Heart.

For the Maha Puja Day, Ganapati Muni  wrote six verses entitled Soundaryamba Shatkam (Six Verses on Soundaryamba i.e
Azhagammal).

1. In the first quarter of the night of Friday, the ninth day of the dark fortnight of Vaisaka month,
Dhundubi year,

2. Wife of Sundaram Iyer born in the exalted lineage of Bharadwaja, Parasara, and mother of Sri Ramana Maharshi
born as an avatara of Guru Guha, the blessed lady,

3. One devoid of any attachment, one cleansed by bhakti to Siva, one whose prana was arrested by the touch of Guha
one whose tendencies were all destroyed that very moment.

4. She, Soundaryamba, became that Light which can be known only by the Vedantic Vakyas, which is all pervasive,
and which was known by her son.

5. At the Samadhi of Soundaryamba, the stream which poured out the lotus palms of Ramana Maharshi became a new
teertha, the Agasamana Teertham (the teertha whcih removes all sins, by keeping the mind still).

6. Glory to the holy mother of sacred Ramana!
    Glory to the Samadhi!
    Glory to the Lingam consecrated by the Maharshi! 
    Glory to the new Aghasamana Teertham!

Sri Krishna Bhiksu's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #537 on: October 27, 2014, 12:52:55 PM »
On June 9, 1944, the Asramam letter asked me to correct the proof of Nenevadanu (Who am I?) making the necessary
corrections and to transcribe the Sloka 'Deham, Naham, Koham, Soham' on the last blank page and write its word- for-
word meaning and paraphrase to be printed in the book. I did it accordingly.

At this time, I wrote twice to the Asramam praying that Sri Bhagavan might be pleased to render His Ulladu Narpadu into
Telugu verse Himself as He had done His Upadesa Saram. It was done in due course.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

 

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #538 on: October 27, 2014, 01:48:49 PM »
Sarvam Vasudeva Mayam Jagat:

Krishna Premi was an Englishman.  He was fascinated by the Sri Vaishnava philosophy. He used to often chant Sarvam
Vasudeva Mayam Jagat.

Krishna Premi came to see Bhagavan to Tiruvannamalalai at the instance of Dilip Kumar Roy.  Viswanatha Swami took
him, after Krishna Premi's darshan of Bhagavan and breakfast,  to all places in and around Arunahchala Hill. Absorbed in
stories of Bhagavan, Krishna Premi lost all sense of time.  He sat down on a rock in Skandasramam and got immersed in
meditation. 

After some time, Viswanatha Swami murmured in his ears" 'Sir, we have been in Gokulam for long time. Krishna is now
in Brindavan and shall we proceed to Brindavan to rejoin our Lord?'  Krishna Premi came out of his trance and they hurried
back to Sri Ramanasramam to join Bhagavan for lunch. 

Later Krishna Premi asked Bhagavan: Is not the precept Sarvam Vasudeva Mayam Jagat the most wonderful teaching of
all the time?  Bhagavan said: 'Yes, there is no doubt about that.  You say I perceive Vasudeva in everything. But have you
not find out who this 'I' is?  Do all the creatures and objects in creation come you and say 'I am Vasudeva?' You are one
who say so.  Everything depends upon your personal perception.  When, instead if you learn to perceive the Lord within
yourself, you too become Vasudeva.  Do you understand?  When the Seer identifies himself with Vasudeva, the seen
seen automatically becomes Vasudeva too.  This is what Sankaracharya says when he means, Drishtim Jnanamayeem
Krishna.'

When he heard this, Krishna Premi's eyes filled with tears of joy and gratitude. 

He prostrated to Bhagavan with utmost love and reverence.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.           

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #539 on: October 27, 2014, 02:53:02 PM »
Selfless Cooks:

In the early days of the Asramam, there were only a few permanent inmates.  At that time, Shanatammal of Ramanathapuram
and Thenammal of Tirumangalam worked in the kitchen. Occasionally, Lakshmi Ammal of Tiruchuzhi used to join them.
Lokammal of Pattakurichi, Sampuranammal of Vathirayiruppu, Subbalakshmi Ammal and Sankarammal of Nellore also helped
later. The following persons helped with cooking and serving: Srinivasa Iyer of Polur, Madhava Rao of Cuddalore and Natesa
Iyer. When the kitchen and dining hall were built in 1938, Ranga Rao shouldered the responsibility of running the kitchen till
Sri Bhagavan's Mahasamadhi.  Rao was ably assisted by a number of people. Everyone mentioned above did their job without
any remuneration. They did it as service to Sri Bhagavan.  At the moment Sampurnammal is at the Asramam.

Raja Subramania Iyer was postmaster of the Asramam post office from 1938 when it was established, until 1977, He is
popularly known as Raja Iyer.  He used to work in the kitchen also.  He would get up at 3 O'clock in the morning , have his
bath, make iddlis for breakfast by 6.00 a.m. and attend to the post office work later.  He retired from the kitchen and the post
office at the age of 83 and passed away a few years ago.

Brahadambal of Ramanathapuram used to come and have darshan of Sri Bhagavan frequently. She settled down in the Asramam.
Now she lights the lamps in the temple and helps in the kitchen.  She served Muruganar tiil the very end. She knows a number
of songs by heart.

Kumrasawami was looking after the garland making and store room.  Vadivudaiyar Swami also collected flowers from the
Asramam garden and made garlands and looked after the guests in the guest room. Palaniswami Chettiar who used to
do all outdoor work, is now making garlands. Ramaswami was looking after Skandasramam ably.  All these have been
associated with the Asramam for over thirty  five years.  Pushpammal of Thellar also makes garlands for the Asramam.

(All the devotees mentioned above have passed away)

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.