Author Topic: Our Bhagavan-Stories  (Read 200698 times)

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #510 on: October 21, 2014, 01:19:44 PM »
Asramam and Dogs:

If an Asramam dog barked trying to drive out some intruder and people got angry with it for making a noise, Bhagavan
would defend it, saying that it was only doing its duty for the Asramam. There was at one time a small puppy that
would always relieve itself on a nice smooth spot near the office. Chinnaswami would get furious and try to drive it out
of the Asramam, but again Bhagavan would come to the rescue, saying that if some child did the same thing, nobody
would be angry, and the puppy was only a child and knew no better.

He seemed specially to love monkeys and often said that in many ways they were better than human beings. They lived from
day to day not planning for the future, and there was no premeditation in the mischief they performed.  He would be very
amused, when some monkey would slip into the Hall, and snatch away plantains from the side of an unsuspecting devotee
who had just had them returned as holy prasadam.  He would often give directions that they should be fed and encouraged
them in many ways much to the annoyance of the management to whom they were a great nuisance.

Sadhu Arunachala's (Major Chadwick's) Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         
 , 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #511 on: October 21, 2014, 01:32:54 PM »
Teachings of Sri Bhagavan:

An Asramam letter dated July 15, 1942, which was sent along with some recent publications of Sri Bhagavan's works,
stated:

'Regarding Sri Bhagavan's teachings, they constitute the Upanishad of the Upanishads.  Several devotees well versed in
the Vedas and Upanishads have said that in the light of Sri Bhagavan's teachings the texts they had studied previously
acquired a new significance.'

A few days later, I had a peculiar dream. I dreamt that I was in the Asramam but could not see  Sri Bhagavan anywhere.
I searched and searched, wept  and wept at not finding Him till fatigue overcame me and plunged me into slumber.
Then I had again a dream (within the dream) that I sat face to face with Sri Bhagavan. In that position I recollected the
previous disappearance of Sri Bhagavan and dismissed it as a dream. I felt that my being then in the presence of  Sri
Bhagavan was the only Reality.  This vision was so vivid and realistic that by comparison the waking consciousness after
I awoke seemed hazy.  The hard core of reality seemed to melt and dissolve. The dreaming and waking states having
submerged their boundaries seemed to flow into each other, to mingle and become one. As I related the experience in a
letter to the Asramam, I wondered whether I was really awake, whether the so called waking activity including the writing of
the letter was not part of an extended dream - As I recall that incident now, I may be pardoned for confessing a doubt whether
even bit this writing is not also a continuation of the dream from which the final waking will be into the one Reality that is
Sri Bhagavan.

Recollections of G.V. Subbaramayya.

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #512 on: October 21, 2014, 01:49:02 PM »
'Mugavapuri Murugan':

Viswanatha Swami, one of Sri Bhagavan's disciples, was also an intimate friend of Muruganar.  Muruganar had a passionate
love for the Tamizh language. This made him change his original name of 'Ramanathapuram Subrahmanyam' to Mugavapuri
Murugan, Mugavapuri is the Tamizh equivalent of Ramanathapuram and Murugan is the Tamizh world for Subrahmanyam.

Viswanatha Swami was amused by Muruganar's fastidiousness and liked to tease him. Once while he was in the Hall,
with Bhagavan, and a few other devotees, Viswanatha Swami kept repeating the phrase, 'Mugavapuri Murugan' . Bhagavan
noticed this and said to him: Viswanatha! Instead of simply chanting it, why don't you compose a poem using those two
words?

Viswanatha Swami immediately took out a piece of paper and very enthusiastically began his poem with the words, Mugavapuri
Murugan. Try as he might, however he could not think of anything beyond these two words. At last, in sheer frustraton,
he went out leaving the paper with Bhagavan. By the time Viswanatha Swami returned, Bhagavan had a lovely poem ready.
Apart from the two words Mugavapuri Murugan nothing had been written by Viswanatha Swami. Nevertheless, Bhagavan had
had signed  the poem, 'Viswanathan', attributing its composition to Viswanatha Swami.

A translation of the poem is as follows:

'Arunachala Ramana, the One who resides in t he lotus of my heart, laughed at my foolish ego and destroyed it completely
with a single glance. He then proceeded to shower His grace upon me, Mugavapuri Murugan, to enable me to enlighten the
entire world with the Murai (Ramana Sannidhi Murai) which is comparable to Tiruvachakam.'

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                   

Balaji

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #513 on: October 21, 2014, 03:35:22 PM »
Shantammal - Eternal Bhagavan Part III. (Maharshi Newsletter Jan/Feb 1999)

M.: "Everything must be done in a hurry.
Everybody has some train to catch.
They visit Swami in a rush and want to carry away a parcel of liberation.
They read something here and there and think they are quite learned."

(Whenever there was a chance to snub our ego, Bhagavan would never miss it).

He continued:
"Before the people come here, everyone has
the most sincere desire to work for his own liberation,
but when they settle down,
the ego goes to their heads and they forget why they came.
They imagine they are doing me great service by
feeding me and think altogether too much of themselves.
The feeling of self-importance that they have when
they serve their guru destroys their hope of enlightenment.
Only humility can destroy the ego.
The ego keeps you far away from God.
The door to God is open, but the lintel is very low.
To enter one has to bend.
Are you doing me greater service than the man
who for years was like my shadow?
What was the good of it?
The same man went to court against me and got me cross-examined!
Even if a trace of ego is left in the mind it will
rapidly increase and ruin you spiritually."
Om Namo Bagavathe Sri Ramanaya

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #514 on: October 21, 2014, 03:45:45 PM »
In the above story where Viswanatha Swami wanted to write a verse starting 'Mugavaapuri Murugan' and which was completed by
Sri Bhagavan after some time is as under:



அகத் தாமரை மலர் மீது ஊறை அருணாசல ரமணன்
நகைத்தான் உற விழித்தான் அறச் செகுத்தான் எனது உயிரை
மிகத்தான் அருள் சுரந்தான் என முகவாபுரி முருகன்
செகத்தார் உய வகுத்தான் முறை திருவாசக நிகரே.

This is available under the Preface of Sri Ramana Sannidhi Murai.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #515 on: October 21, 2014, 04:44:14 PM »
Demise of Pazhani Swami:

Sri Bhagavan moved to Skandasramam after spending a number of years at Virupaaksha Cave. Pazhaniswami also
spent some months with Sri Bhagavan at Skandasramam. He returned to Virupaksha Cave as he felt rather weak.
Sri Bhagavan used to spend some time with him every evening at Virupaksha Cave when He returned from His usual
evening walk. This used to a great solace to Pazhani Swami.  After a while Pazhaniswami fell ill. One day Sri Bhagavan
notice that his condition was very bad. He sat beside him.  He noticed that he was breathing heavily. Sri Bhagavan
put his head on His lap and placed His hands on the chest and head, Shortly after life slowly ebbed out of him.
(This is because Bhagavan placed His hands on his head and chest and after sometime thought that the life breath
had gone back into the Heart to show his liberation.  However, He took out His hands a few second before, and Pazhaniswami
opened his eyes and the life went out through his eyes.  However, Sri Bhagavan confirmed later that even though he did not
get liberated, he might have born in a family of high spiritual pursuits and would have been liberated in that birth.)

What a great tapas he must have performed to leave the world like this! His body was buried near Isanya Math.  Pazhaniswami
closely missed liberation with Sri Bhagavan's method.  However, Mother Azhagammal had liberation when He followed the
same method but did not leave His hands till her breath moved into the Heart, with all vasanas going in mental screen one
by one quickly and then she became pure.  The second soul was the Cow Lakshmi.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.       

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #516 on: October 22, 2014, 12:49:48 PM »
A Devotee with love for dogs:

Kumaraguru had darshan of Sri Bhagavan, when He was at Virupaksha Cave. He used to visit Sri Bhagavan frequently.
He was a good doctor. Whenever he came to Skandasramam, he would bring fruit and vegetables.  He was staying with
his family in the town. He used to consider himself a devotee of dogs and would bathe and feed the Asramam dogs like
Sikappan, Karuppan, Kamala and Jackie.  He used shower his affection on them.  He had a photo of himself taken along
with them.  After Sri Bhagavan moved to Mother's samadhi, he used to visit Him. A little later he passed away.

Soon after, his son Subramanyam, who used to serve the Asramam, left for Madras with his family. A few years later,
he came back to the  Asramam, with his wife and two children. He built a house for himself on Pudupalaayam Rangasswami
Gounder's plot. At that time, I was staying in the big house of Gounder but had my food with Subramanyam family.
Later Subramanyam bought a house in  Sri Ramana Nagar and shifted there. From then on I used to eat at C. Somsasundaram
Pillai's place. Somassundaram Pilai came from Cuddalore and settled down in Tiruvannamalai.  A few years later Subramanyam's
wife passed away.  After marrying off his children, Ramani and Ramanan, Subramanyam again served the Asramam till his
death.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
   
 

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #517 on: October 22, 2014, 01:34:50 PM »
Peacocks:

Many peacocks settled in the Asramam but it seemed that not all were able to remain in such surroundings. Two were
brought there by some villager but did not stay through they were brought back two or three times. Bhagavan remarked
that they were not yet ready. 

This is most interesting  and shows that all were not fit to remain in His presence, and that even animals came there
with a purpose. He also told us how, at times, people would reincarnate in the body of some animal just for a chance to
be near Him. There is, of course, the famous example of Lakshmi the cow.

The  Rani of Baroda gave Sri Bhagavan a white peacock and two white peahens to go with Him. The male was especially
devoted to Bhagavan and never wanted to leave His side.  Bhagavan was then living in a shed at the side of the Old Hall,
which owing to the number if visitors increasing, He had outgrown. So a perch was put up there by the side of His couch
and there the peacock slept at night.  People used to say that it was Madhavaswamy, Bhagavan's late attendant who had
passed away sometime before.  Bhagavan would nurse this peacock and pick lice off its body.  He taught not to
eat caterpillars and other insects but to be a strict vegetarian.  On the nigh of Bhagavan's passing, it stood on the roof of
the small room where Bhagavan was lying and screeched without intermission.  It died in town some years later as the colored
peacocks always drove it away whenever it came near the Asramam. However, they did not treat the peahens in the same way,
but through them created numerous progeny.             

Major Chadwick's (Sadhu Arunachala's Reminiscences .

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #518 on: October 22, 2014, 01:51:01 PM »
God alone exists:

Those who have realized the Self, even when they are engaged in everyday activities, remain uninvolved. They are always in
a state of utter stillness. Bhagavan Himself has described this in the 30th verse of the Ulladu Narpadu, Anubabandham.

Bhagavan said: The wise one does not attach any importance to concepts of time and space. One has to go through
certain situations in a given lifetime and for this body is required. This is the only reason for acquiring the body.

God alone exists. A jivan mukta has the same attitude towards His body.  He has no worry for the body and God takes
care of it.   The Jivanmukta carries the body through the pre ordained experiences of a life time and at the end of
course, he lays down the burden with relief,  Like a porter leaving his burden on his head and be free after reaching
the destination.  The Jivan Mukta discards the human body without any regrets or sorrow.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.
             

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #519 on: October 22, 2014, 03:51:26 PM »
Lakshaarchana for Yogamba in Matrubhuteswarar Temple:

During Dasara vacation, in 1942, I again visited the Asramam. The temple building work was progressing steadily.  The institution
of Lakshaarchana (worshipping Mother Godess, Yogamba) in the temporary Asramam shrine during Navaratri was a new, impressive
feature.  WE rejoiced to find that the Asramam prosperous and expanding its activities in many directions. But the Asramam life was visibly
changing. What with the rushing crowds of visitors in ever increasing  numbers on one hand and the decline of health of Sri
Bhagavan on the other, it became necessary to restrict the time for darshan  of Sri Bhagavan.  So with the old Asramam life of close 
intimacy with Sri Bhagavan became well nigh impossible under the new conditions, and this was saddening especially to old devotees.
At that time of departure I submitted two Telugu classics Kaivalya Navaneetham and Aamukta Malyada to Sri Bhagavan with a prayer
to perusal at leisure.

G.V. Subbaramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #520 on: October 23, 2014, 01:20:57 PM »
Bhagavan's explanation about thoughts:

Bhagavan once told me that thought comes in flashes, no thought was continuous.  It was like the cycle of alternating
current, but was so rapid that it seemed continuous as does the light given off by an electric bulb.  If one could only
concentrate on the intervals between thoughts rather than on the thoughts themselves that would be Self Realization.

He always taught that mind and thought were exactly the same.

'The mind is nothing but a lot of thoughts.' -- Upadesa Undiayar Verse 18.

And again that ego and mind were identical and arose together,

'The ego rising all else will rise. '  Ulladu Narpadu Verse 26.

'The ego the root of all thought.'  - Ulladu Narpadu Verse 40.

Yes, surely but,

'The mind in truth is only the thought 'I' - Ulladu Narpadu, Verse 40.

Then ego is impermanent as thought and has in truth no real existence at all. Do not the Buddhists say that there is no
such thing as ego? Which brings us directly to Advaita.

Sadhu Arunachala's (Major Chadwick's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.         

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #521 on: October 23, 2014, 01:41:58 PM »
Absolute Perfection:

It was a festival day and modkams were being prepared in the Asramam kitchen.  (Modakam is a sweet prepared in
South India as an offering to Lord Ganesa).

On that particular day, Shanthamma, Sampooranamma, Shankaramma, Lokamma  and some others were engaged in making
modakams. Each of them had a portion of poornam (jaggery and coconut mixture) on a plate, and they were moulding the
rice flour into cups and filling the cups with poornam. Each of the ladies worked at her own pace, and so, some of them finished
their portion of the pooranam faster than others.

On His way to the cowshed, Bhagavan entered the kitchen and stood for a few moments, watching the ladies at their work.
The conversation  among the ladies included remarks like, 'Mu ppornam is over.  You have so much poornam with you.
Why don't you give me some of your poornam?' and, 'Oh! You don't have any poornam left. Please give me some more, etc.,'
After a while, one of the ladies got up, saying, 'All my poornam is over.'

Bhagavan, who had been listening to the ladies's remarks, smiled at them and said, "You have all been talking about poornam.
And  the other said she could spare a little of her poornam. One lady even remarked that all her pooanam was over.
Whatever the context in which it was used, the word retained its meaning. Whether there was too much poornam or no
poornam at all, the identity of poornam (Wholeness) remained unchanged. This uuchanging nature is the mark of the everlasting
perfection.  The ideal of absolute perfection is set out in the benedictory verse of the Isvasaya Upanishad thus: 'The Whole
comes out of the Whole. This also the Whole. The Whole comes out of the Whole. When you remove the Whole from the
Whole, what remains is also the Whole.;

It is this beautiful philosophical idea that Bhagavan expounded to the ladies in the Asramam kitchen. By relating the
philosophical ideas to everyday incidents.  Bhagavan made it possible for simple people, to grasp the most complex
ideas.

Kanakammal's Reminiscences         

Arunachala Siva.     

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #522 on: October 23, 2014, 05:23:48 PM »
The Scholar too has become like us:

A scholar came from North India to have darshan of Sri Bhagavan and stayed in the Asramam for some days.  He would
sit beside Sri Bhagavan's sofa and read aloud verses from the Upanishads and other works in Sanskrit continually.
We would, because of this, neither talk to Sri Bhagavan nor meditate. But Sri Bhagavan was listening to him to all this
patiently. Ten days passed like this.  One day the Scholar was not found beside Sri Bhagavan. There was no noise. He was
sitting in a corner quietly.  When I looked at him in surprise, Sri Bhagavan said in Malayalam, 'The scholar has also  become
like us.' Yes, No one can improve himself or another through mere book knowledge.  The scholar exhibited his scholarship
before Sri Bhagavan, the Sun of Jnana, and finally chose to be quiet. It is a well known  fact that all,m irrespective of whether
they were scholars or illiterates, got peace through the gracious look of Sri Bhagavan. Their ignorance, conceit and worries
also disappeared.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.                   

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #523 on: October 23, 2014, 05:31:11 PM »
Mano Layam and Mano Nasam:

One morning Sri Bhagavan while explaining a verse in Upadesa Saram said:

'Breath control can only  produce Manolayam, i.e. temporary suspension of the mind.  One pointed meditation
and concentration alone can lead to Manonasam.  i.e destruction of the mind.'

On this I complained to Sri Bhagavan that in my meditation, I was often prone to sleep. Sri Bhagavan told me:

'Of course one should be alert in Sadhana and guard against sleep as far one can. But if sleep overpowers it does not
matter.  The moment you wake, you catch up the current of your meditation and continue. So sleep will prove  no
hindrance.'

G.V. Subbramayya's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.           

Subramanian.R

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Re: Our Bhagavan-Stories
« Reply #524 on: October 24, 2014, 01:55:39 PM »
Jadaswami's Samadhi:

Jadaswami had established an Ashram on the Hill even before Sri Bhagavan came to Tiruvannamalai. He was a great
philanthropist. Before taking food, he would find out whether the sadhus in the neighboring caves had taken their meal.
He would send food to those who have not eaten. Only then he would eat.  He would not eat without taking a bath.
His matted hair was so long that it reached the ground.  After his bath, it had to be held by someone till it dried.

He was greatly devoted to Sri Bhagavan.  On the day of Sri Bhagavan's Mother was laid to rest, he was there at Pali
Tirtham till the very end of all ceremonies.  He was attached to us as he knew we were Sri Bhagavan's devotees.

Several years later, after Sri Bhagavan had come down to Mother's Samadhi permanently, once when the sixth day of the
Kartigai festival was being celebrated, someone came and reported that Jadaswami had passed away.  Sri Bhagavan said
to me: Go and do whatever needs to be done.

Kunju Swami's Reminiscences.

Arunachala Siva.